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RADCUFFE COLLEGE UBRARYl 



Syf 



WOMEN'S ARCHIVES 

Transferred from 

HARVARD COLLEGE LIBRARY 

1960 




7i^ 



I^arbarlj Collrse ILifarart! 

RECEIVED BY BEQUEST 
tje SEPTEMBER 20, 1926 ^ 



(f-r 



/'J/l^it/rA./jZZ^ sIx^^CC^.^ ri^<^9 /x^ /O /% C 



\ 



THE RUMFORD COMPLETE 
COOK BOOK 



THE 

RUMFORD 

COMPLETE 

COOK BOOK 



BT 

LILY HAXWORTH WALLACE 

Gold Medalist 

Graduate of National Training School of Cookb&t 
London^ £ng. 



PRICE, ONE DOLLAR 



v^i 



published BT THE 

RUMFORD CHEMICAL WORKS 
PROVIDENCE, R.I. 



Txo •m-<s^.o^ 



HARVARD COLLEGE LIBRARY 

BEQUEST or 

MRS. CHESTER H. GREENOUGH 

REfTEMBER 20. 1926 



Copyright, 1908^ 

By The Rumford Ghemicai* Works, 

Providence, R J. 






Printed by 
The University Press, Cambridge, Mass., U.S. A. 



PREFACE 

T^HE recipes in this book have been carefully 
^ tested) and if measurements and general in- 
structions are followed, the result in every case will 
be satisfactory. 

The author has endeavored to give clear and con- 
cise mstructions for the best dishes of their kind; 
rather than take up space for repetition of the same 
general recipe varied only in jSavoring, form of baking 
and other minor detail. 

It will be noted in the table of weights and meas- 
ures that all measurements are given as level. Un- 
less otherwise stated in the individual recipe, this rule 
should always be followed. 

Ideas vary as to what constitutes a rounding or 
heaping spoon or cupful, while levbl is or should be 
the same the world over — as much as spoon or cup 
will hold, then leveled off with a knife. 

It is not claimed that these recipes are all new. 
Some are original; some the gift of friends who have 
experimented till good results were obtained; some 
are old family recipes, never before printed; while 
others are standard rules that have stood the test of 
years and are still at the head of their respective 
lists. However, all have been tested and may be 
used by the novice with the same certainty of suc- 
eess as when the ingredients are combined by the 
experienced cook. 

LILY HAXWORTH WALLACE. 



tfJ 



WEIGHTS AITD MEASURES 



1 cupful 

4 cupf uls 

3 teaspoonfuls 

IgiU 

16 tablespoonfuls of liquid 

2 cups butter packed solid 

4 cups sifted flour . . 

9 large eggs 

2 cups granulated sugar 
2 tablespoonfuls butter 
4 wineglassf uls . . . 
4 tablespoonfuls . . . 

60 drops 

4 tablespoons flour . . 



>^pint 
1 quart 

1 tablespoonfoL 
yi cupf uL 
1 cupfuL 
1 pound. 
1 pound. 
1 pound. 
1 pound. 
1 ounce. 
1 cupf uL 
1 wineglassfuL 
1 teaspoonfuL 
1 ounce. 



Teaspoonfuls and tablespoonfuls are measured 
level unless otherwise stated. 

One-half spoonful is measured lengthwise of the 
spoon. 

Cupfuls are measured level full. 

A set of measures (quart, pint and half-pint) 
should be in every kitchen. The graduated meas- 
ures divided into quarters, halves and thirds are 
best. A graduated glass measure is also advisable 
for the correct measurement of liquids. 

A set of accurate scales is also indispensable to 
good cooking and housekeeping. 



c?o 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



213 

213 
213 
214 

214 



Beverages . 

Tea 

Iced Tea . . 
Boiled Ck>ffee 
FQtered Coffee 
Black or After-dinner 
Coffee . . . 

Caf^aulait 214 

Iced Coffee in Perfection 214 

Chocolate 214 

Cocoa 215 

ChocolateCreamNectar 215 

Bbead, Rolls, Muffins, 

Rumford Biscuit . . . 115 

Whole Wheat Biscuit . 116 

Rye Biscuit 116 

Potato Biscuit . . . .116 

Maple Rolls 117 

Parker House Rolls . . 117 

Quick Graham Rolls. . 117 

FrenchlRolls 118 

Larchmont Muffins . . 118 

Cream Muffins .... 119 

Graham Gems .... 119 

Date Gems 119 

Pop-Overs 119 

Cake 

Lemon Cake 

Chocolate Loaf Cake . 
Coffee Chocolate Cake . 
White Cake . . 
Sultana Cake . 
Honey Cake . . 
Gold Loaf Cake. 
Nut Cake . . . 
Cornstarch Cake 
Devil Cake. . . 
Poor Man's Cake 



PAGB 

213 



Fruit Punch 215 

Tea Punch 216 

Blackberry Cordial . . 216 
Grape Juice ..... 216 
Raspberry Vinegar . . 216 

Ginger Cup 217 

MintCorcSal .... 217 

lime Punch 217 

Claret Punch . . . . 21S 
MuUedQder .... 218 



ETC 115 

Quick Breakfast Puffs . 120 
Oatmeal Sticks .... 120 
Hot Cross Buns. ... 120 
Rumford Whole Wheat 

Bread 121 

Rumford Dyspeptic 

Bread 121 

Southern Egg Bread . 122 

Com Bread 122 

Baked Brown Bread. . 122 
Steamed Brown Bread . 123 
Yeast Bread 123 



134 
135 
135 
135 
136 
136 
136 
137 
137 
137 
138 



Pound Cake 

Plain Cocoanut Cake . 
Inexpensive Fruit Cake 
White Fruit Cake . . . 
Rich Fruit Cake . . . 
Wedding Fruit Cake . 
Yorkshire Parkin . . . 
Scotch Shortbread . . 
Quick German Coffee 

Cake 

German Apple Cake. . 



. 133 

138 
138 
139 
139 
139 
140 
140 
141 

141 
141 



(vii) 



• •• 

VIU 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Cske-^ continued 

Plain Sponge Cake . . 142 
Old-fashioned Sponge 

Cake 142 

Pineapple Cake . . . 142 

Jelly Roll 143 

Egress Cake 143 

Orange-Cocoanut Cake 143 

Plain Loaf Cake ... 144 

LUyCake 144 

Lady Baltimore Cake . 144 

Fig Layer Odce ... 145 

Coffee Layer Cake . . 145 

MarshmaUow Cake . . 145 

White Layer Cake . . 146 



PAcm 

Layer Cake No. 1 . . 146 

Layer Cake No. 2 . . 146 

Date Lunch Cake . . 147 

English Wahiut Cake . 147 

Layers for Mocha Cake. 147 

Queen Cakes 148 

Lady Fingers .... 148 

New Year's Cakes . . 148 

Queen Eclairs 149 

fWy Cones 149 

Creiun Puffs 149 

Pecan Sticks 150 

Moon Cakes 150 

Rollemups 150 



Cake Fillings, Fbostings 

Fig Filling 153 

Ahnondfllling .... 153 

Maple Filling 153 

Orange and Walnut 

raBng 153 

Orange and Coooanut 

Rffing 154 

Portsmouth Orange 

Filling 154 

Lady Baltimore Filling 154 
Mocha Filling and 

Frosting 155 



AND Icings .... 153 

Caramel Nut Fillmg. . 155 

Marshmallow Filling . 155 

Prune Almond Filling . 155 

Chocolate Frosting . . 156 

Lemon Frosting . . . 156 

Boiled Frosting .... 156 

Plain Orange Icing . . 156 

Coffee Icing 157 

Opera Caramel Icing . 157 

Fondant Icing .... 157 

Milk Frosting .... 158 



Canning^ Preserving and Pickling 179 



To Pbbp ABB Strttps for 

Canned Fruits. . . 180 
For Plums. Peaches, 
Cherries, rears, Black- 
berries 180 

The Selection of Fruit . 180 
To Can Fruit in Jars 

over the Fire .... 180 
To Can by the Open 

Kettle Process ... 181 
To Can without Cooking 181 
jBLLTMAxma .... 181 
Currant and Grape 

JeUies 182 

Apple, Phun, Crab- 
Apple or Qumce Jelly 182 



To COTXR Jblusb 
Preserved Rhubarb 
Spiced Grapes . . 
Ginger Pears . . . 
Brandied Fias . . 
Gooseberry Jelly . 
Orange Mannaiade 
Lemon Marmalade 
Chopped Raw Pickle 
Green Tomato Pickle 
Mustard Pickle . . . 

Chili Sauce 

Sweet Pickled Prunes 
Pickled Peaches. . . 
Tomato Catsup . . 



183 
183 
184 
184 
184 
185 
185 
185 
186 
186 
186 
187 
187 
187 
188 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



IX 



CARVINa 

Fish 233 

Mbatb 233 

Bib Roast 233 

Sirloin or Porterhouse 

Steak 234 

Round Steak 234 

Fresh or Salt Ham . . 234 

Tongue 234 

Leg of Lamb or Mutton 234 

Chafing-Dish Recipes 191 



Loin of Lamb or Pork 
OroTm Roast of Lamb 
PbtnmRY .... 
Roast Fowl . . 
Boiled Fowl . . 
Broiled Chicken 
Duck and Goose 
To Bond a Fowl 



PAQB 

. 233 

235 

235 

235 

235 

235 

235 

235 

236 



Celeried Oysters ... 191 
Epicurean Oysters. . . 192 
Oysters with Mush- 
rooms 192 

Oysters & la Poulette . 192 
Pigs in Blankets ... 192 
Mmced Clams .... 193 
Fricasseed Clams ... 193 
Deviled Lobster ... 193 
Lobster & la Newburg . 194 
Shrimps & la Creole . . 194 
Deviled Eggs .... 194 
Scrambled Eggs with 
Tomatoes 195 

Ck>NPECTIONS , 

Molasses Candy ... 207 

Maple Kisses .... 207 

Peanut Brittle .... 207 

P^permint Drops . . 207 

Dakota Caramels ... 208 

Fudge 208 

Chocolate Creams. . . 208 

Creamed Walnuts . . . 208 



with Green 



feppers 

Welsh Rabbit 

Savory Rabbit .... 

Blushmff Bunny . . . 

Cheese f*ondue .... 

Cheese Toast Sand- 
wiches 

Chicken Liv^s Saut^i 

Lamb Terrapin .... 

Sweetbreads with Peas 

Deviled Tomatoes. . . 



195 
195 
195 
196 
196 

190 
197 
197 
197 
198 



207 

Glac6 Sugar 209 

Cocoanut Cream Candy 209 
French Nougat .... 209 



Butter Scotch 
Pralines . . . 
January Thaw 
Sea Foam . . 



210 
210 
210 
210 



Eggs 

Hard and Soft Cookbd 

Egos 83 

Shirred Eggs 83 

Poached or Dropped 



83 



Scrambled Eggs. ... 84 

Plain Omelet 84 

Orange Omelet .... 85 

CSieese Omelet .... 85 

Omelet Souffle .... 86 

Omelet Celestine ... 86 



Cheese Soufl0[6 .... 86 

Chicken Souffle ... 87 

Lemon Souffl6 .... 87 

Swiss Eggs 87 

Eggs in Prison .... 88 

Japanese Eggs .... 88 

Ef^Tunbales .... 88 

Savory Eggs 89 

Curried Eggs 89 

Scotch E^ 90 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PAGE 



Entries and Cheese 

Ham and Macaroni 
Scallop 

Fricassee of liver . . . 

Meat Fritters 

Corned Beef Croquettes 

Blanauette of Veal . . 

Veal Klopps 

Chicken Livers with 
Bacon 

Chicken Chartreuse . . 

Stuffed Peppers . . . 

Broiled Sweetbreads . . 



Dishes 

Cheese Puffs 

53 Cheese Patties .... 

53 Escalloped Cheese. . . 

54 Cheese Toast 

54 Deviled Cheese .... 

54 Macaroni au Gratin 

55 Swedish Timbales . . 
Mushroom Filling for 

55 Timbales 

55 Sweetbread and Mush- 

56 room Filling .... 
66 Oyster Filliug 



53 



Baked 



9 



Fish .... 

To Bakb'Fibh 
Stuffing for 

Fish 9 

To:^oilFish .... 10 

To SAUTfi Fish . ... 10 

To Fry Fish 11 

To Broil Fish .... 11 
Baked Bluefish in Per- 
fection 11 

Perfect Fish Balls . . . 12 

Fish Timbales .... 12 



Codfish Fritters. . 
Scalloped Oysters . 
To^Prepare the Crumbs 
Fried Oysters .... 
To Boil LoBffFBR . . 
To Broil Lobster . 
Lobster Croquettes . 
Stuffed Fillets of Fish 
Shrimp Patties . . . 
Moulded Fish . . . 



56 

57 
57 
57 
58 
58 
58 

59 



59 



13 
13 
13 
14 
14 
14 
15 
15 
16 
16 



Fish and Meat Sauces . 47 



Oyster Sauce . . 
Bechamel Sauce. 
Mint Sauce. . . 
Cucumber Sauce 
Mushroom Sauce 
Mattre d'H6tel Sauce 
Bdamaise Sauce. . . 



47 Horseradish Sauce. 



47 Piquante Sauce . . . .49 

47 Tartare Sauce .... 49 

47 Tomato Sauce .... 50 

48 Parsl^ Sauce 50 

48 To Prepare the Pars- 

48 ley 50 



49 



Frying 29 

To Prepare Beef Fat for Frying 31 



Gingerbread, Cookies, Doughnuts, etc. 



Dark Gingerbread 
Soft Gingerbread 
Fruit Gingerbread 
Dropped Cookies 
Seed Cookies . . 
Chocolate Cookies 
Sugar Cakes . . 
Jumbles .... 



161 Crullers .... 

161 German Crullers 

161 Sponge Drops . 

162 Cinnamon Crisps 
162 Oatmeal Crisps . . 

162 Whole Wheat Crisps 

163 Brandy Wafers . 
163 Mignons .... 



. 161 

163 
164 
164 
164 
165 
165 
165 
166 



TABLE OP CONTENTS 



XI 



PAGB 

Macaroons 167 

German Macaroons . . 168 
Oatmeal Macaroons . . 168 



Gingerbread — conHnued 

Rumford Doughnuts . 166 

Puff Ball Doughnuts . 166 

Rye Drop Cakes ... 167 

Wonders 167 

How TO Avoid Objectionablb Baking Powders xiv 

Ice Cream and Ices . . 

General Directions 

FOB Freezing ... 171 
Genuine Philadelphia 

Ice Cream 171 

French Ice Cream ... 171 

Punch 171 

Sherbet 171 

Mousse and Parfait . . 171 
Vanilla Ice Cream. . . 172 
Brown Bread Ice Cream 173 
Chocolate Ice Cream . 173 

Meats 

The Choice of Meats 19 

To Roast Meat ... 20 

To Broil Meat .... 21 

To Stew Meat ... 21 

To Boil Fresh Meats 22 

Broiled Lamb .... 22 

Hot-Pot 23 

Brown Stew of Lamb . 23 



Philadelphia Ice Cream 
Peach Ice Cream . . . 
Burnt Almond Ice 

Cream 

Frozen Custard . . 
Nessehxxie Pudding . 
Milk Sherbet . . . 
Raspberry Sherbet . 
Orange Water Ice. . 
Coffee Parfait . . . 
Roman Punch . . . 



. 171 

173 
173 

174 
174 
174 
175 
175 
175 
176 
176 



19 



Irish Stew 24 

Stuffed Shoulder of 

Mutton 24 

Beefsteak Pie 24 

Pot Roast of Beef. . . 25 

Cannelon of Beef ... 25 

Beef Olives 26 

Veal Cutlets 26 



Pastry 

Short Paste 105 

Five-minute Paste. . . 106 

Flaky Paste 106 

Puff Paste 106 

Apple Custard Pie . . 107 

Mince Pie Filling ... 107 
Cranberry and Raisin 

Pie 108 

Pumpkin Pie 108 

Lemon Meringue Pie. . 108 

Orange Cream Pie. . . 108 

Cheese Tartlets ... 109 

Poultry 

The Preparation of 

fotjutrt 35 

To Truss a Fowl ... 36 
To Prepare a Bird for 
Broiling 36 



Cheese Cakes. . . . 
English Fruit Tart . 
Lemon Cheese Cakes 
Puff Paste Patties. . 
Suet Crust for Boiled 

Pudding. 
Rumford Dumplings 
Boiled Fruit Dumplings 
Egg Dimiplings . . 
Lobster Patties . . 
Oyster Patties . . 
Chicken Patties . . 



. 105 

109 
109 
110 
110 

110 
111 
111 
111 
112 
112 
112 

. 35 



Dressing for Roast 

Chicken 36 

Chestnut Dressing . . 37 
Plain Dressing for 
Chicken or Turkey , 37 



xu 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Poultry — continued 

Qsfso azid Onion Dress- 
ing 

Potato Dressing. . . . 

Chicken Loaf .... 

Chicken k la Stanley . 

Chicken k la Pn)Ti- 
dence 

Italian Chicken . . . 

Curried Chicken . . . 

Chicken en Casserole . 



Chicken Pot Pie 

38 Pilau of Fow] 
38 Indian Dish) . 
38 To Roast Duck 



Pilau of Fowl 

TnHiftn Dish) 

To Roast Duck 
Bratsed Duck. . . 
39 Potted Pigeons . . 

39 Fried Chicken . . 

40 Fricassee Chicken 
40 Chicken MouM . . 



(an 



Puddings and Pudding Sauces 



PACB 

40 

41 

41 
42 
42 
42 
43 
43 
44 

93 



Quince Pudding. ... 93 
Apricot Souffle .... 93 
Italian Nut Pudding. . 93 
Marmalade Pudding. . 94 
Poor Man's Rice 

Pudding 94 

King George's Pudding 94 

FigPuffs 96 

Canary Pudding ... 95 
IBn gliah Plum Pudding . 95 
Plam Plum Pudding. . 96 
Date Pudding .... 96 
Steamed Orange Pud- 

96 
97 
97 



Baked Orange Pudding 
Mother Eve's Pudding 
Apple Puffs 97 



Cherry Pudding. ... 98 
Lemon SnowbaOs ... 96 

Brown Betty 96 

Cottage Pudding ... 99 

Rice&eam 99 

Bavarian Cream ... 99 
Peach Cream .... 100 
Cofifee Cream .... 100 
Cold Wine Sauce ... 100 

Maple Sauce 101 

Wine Sauce 101 

Cranberry Sauce . . . 101 

Foamy Sauce 101 

Hot Chocolate Sauce . 102 

Hard Sauce 102 

Chocolate Sauce (with- 
out egg) 102 



Salads and Salad Dressings 73 



The CuBANsma of 

Salad Plants ... 73 

Lettuce 73 

Watercress 74 

Endive, Field Salad 

and Dandelion ... 74 

Celery and Chicoiy . . 74 

Radishes 74 

Harlequin Salad ... 75 

Cheese Salad 76 

Neufchatel Salad ... 76 

Potato and Egg Salad 76 

Sandwiches 

Cheese and Green Pep- 
per Sandwiches . . . 201 
Monaco Sandwiches . 201 
Ham and Egg Sand- 
wiches 202 

Boston Sandwiches . . 202 
Savory Sandwiches . . 202 



Tomato and Lima Bean 

Salad 77 

Fruit and Nut Salad. . 77 

Stuffed Tomato Salad . 77 

Mayonnaise Dressing . 78 

French Dressing ... 78 

Horseradish Dressing . 79 

Boiled Salad Dressing . 79 

Cream Dressing. ... 79 

Chicken Salad .... 80 

Cocoanut Salad ... 80 



Cheese-Butter Sandw's 
Cucumber Sandwiches 
Nut and Raisin Sand- 
wiches 

Club Sandwich .... 
Sweet Chocolate Sand- 
wiches 



. 201 

203 

203 

203 
204 

204 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Sick, Recipes for the . 

Lemonade 222 

Barley Water 222 

Toast Water 222 

Bggnog 222 

Junket Eggnog .... 223 
Albumenized Milk . . 223 
To SteriUze Milk ... 223 

Wine Whey 223 

Acid Phosphate Wbey . 224 
Beef and Sago Broth. . 224 
Invalid's Tea .... 224 

Clam Broth 224 

Beef Juice 225 

Beef Tea 225 

Oatmeal Gruel .... 225 

Soups 

Soup Stock ..... 
Ox-tail Soup . . . . , 
Mutton Broth .... 
Turkey Sotip ..... 
Tomato Bisque . . . 
Cream of Os^ster Soup . 



Com Meal Gruel 
Arrowroot Gruel 
Liah Moss . . . 
Savory Custard 
Puffed £^ . . 
Custard Souffle 
Eg^ Cream. . . 
Damty Pudding 
Tapioca Jelly 
Chicken Chartreuse . . 
Sweetbreads H la New- 



burg. 
Beefcakes 



Scraped 
wiches 



Beef Sand- 



xm 

PAOB 

. 221 

226 
226 
226 
227 
227 
227 
228 
228 
22S 
229 

229 
229 

230 



1 Clam Chowder .... 4 

2 Clear Soup 5 

3 Garnisbes fob Clear 

3 Soups 6 

3 Soirp CnoirroNs ... 6 
4 



Tebms Used in Cookery, Definitions op . xv 
63 



Vbgetablbs 

Thb Pbbparation and 

COOKINO OF VSGlh 

TABugs ...... 63 

Cabbage, Cauliflower, 

Dandelion and Beet 

Greens 63 

Spinach 63 

Beets 64 

Sununer Squash ... 64 

Hubbard ^uash ... 64 

To Bake Squash ... 64 

Eggplant 64 

To Stuff and Bake 

Eggplant 64 

Waffles, Griddle Cakes, 

Rumford Waffles ... 127 
Com Meal Waffles . . 127 
Cereal Waffles .... 127 
Pound Cake Waffles . 128 
Rye Griddle Cakes . . 128 
Com Meal GriddleCakes 128 



Asparagus 64 

Green C<Hii 65 

Peas 65 

Potatoes 66 

Savoiy Potatoes ... 67 

Hashed Brown Potatoes 67 

Potato Croquettes. . . 68 

Lyonnaise Potatoes . . 68 

Creole Tomatoes ... 68 

Escalloped Cauliflower. 69 

Creamed Celery ... 69 

Hashed Turnip .... 70 

Com Oysters .... 70 

ETC 127 

Rice Griddle Cakes . . 129 

Potato Griddle Scones . 129 

Quick Buckwheat Cakes 129 

iFWch Pancakes ... 130 

Cream Pancakes . . . 130 

German Pancakes . . 130 



Weights and Measures vi 



How to Avoid Objectionable 
Baking Powders 



READ THE LABEL 

pVERY baking powder should show on the label 
" in plain language all its ingredients, so that 
the public may know whether it contains alum or 
other unhealthful material. The Pure Food laws 
generally require this. 

Scientific names are sometimes used on the labels 
of alum powders, such as "sulphate of alumina," 
"aluminum sulphate," "sodium aluminum sulphate," 
etc., instead of the plain word alum, but whenever 
the word alumina or aluminum appears it means 
some form of alum. 

Some alum baking powders contain a little ordi- 
nary phosphate and are then called "phosphate," 
or "alum-phosphate" baking powders; but of course 
the addition of the phosphate does not remove the 
unhealthful alum quality. 

All baking powders which contain alum, by what- 
ever name they may be called, or whatever other 
ingredients they may contain, should be avoided. 

Rumford Baking Powder does not contain alum in 
any form, but is a strictly pure 'phosphate powder in 
which is used the latest improvement of the genuine 
Professor Horsford's phosphate made by u^ solely for 
our own preparations, and none of which is ever sold 
for use in other baking powders. 



(xir) 



DEFINITIONS OF TERMS 

USED IN COOKERY 

A la Creole. Cooked with tomatoes, onions and pep- 
pers. 

A la PrirUanihre. A soup or stew served with young 
spring vegetables. 

Aspic, A savory jelly for meats, fish, vegetables 
and salads. Frequently used as a garnish. 

Au Gratin. Cooked with browned crumbs and 
usually with grated cheese. 

Bain-marie, A vessel containing hot water in which 
other vessels containing foods are placed to 
keep hot without further cooking. Literally 
a double boiler on a large scale. 

Bechamel. A rich white sauce made with stock, 
milk or cream. 

Bisque. A thick white sauce or soup generally made 
from shellfish. 

Blanch. To whiten by scalding. 

Bouillon. A meat broth. 

Bombe. Moulded ices having the outside one va- 
riety and the centre another. 

Bouquet of Herbs. A bunch of various flavoring 
herbs, used for soups or stews. 

Braise. To cook in a closely covered stewpan with 
vegetables, having a gentle heat, that neither 
flavor fior juices are lost by evaporation. 

Canapi. A finger strip of bread or toast spread with 
a savory compound, usually either fish or egg, 
daintily garnished and served as an appetizer 
before lunch or dinner. 

(XV) 



xn DEFINITION OF TEEMS USED IN COOKERT 

CroiLstades. Small pieces of bread fried or toasted. 
Used as a garnish for minced or hashed meat 

En Brochette. Small portions of meat, such as 
chicken livers, cooked with bacon on a skewer. 

Entrie. A savory made dish served as a course itself, 
or between heavier courses, at dinner. 

Farci. Stuffed. 

FofUtue. Cheese and eggs cooked together. 

FrappS. Half frozen. 

Glaci. Glazed over. In savory dishes with meat- 
stock, boiled down to a glaze; in sweet cook- 
ery, iced or brushed over with white of egg. 

Hors-^^amvres. Small dishes served during the first 
course of a dinner. 

Jardinikre. Mized vegetables. 

Lard. To insert strips of fat pork or bacon in meats 
deficient in fat, with a larding needle. 

MacSdoine. A mixture of vegetables or fruits. 

Marinate. To make savory in a mixture of season- 
ings: oil and vinegar, or oil and lemon juice. 

Meringue. White of egg and sugar beaten together. 

Mousse. May be savory or sweet. A light, frothy 
mixture thickened with gelatine, whipped 
with a whisk till spongy in texture and then 
packed in ice and salt for three or four hours* 

MvUigatavmy. A rich soup flavored with curry. 

P6U. A small pastry shell, usually made from puff 
paste. May contain either a sweet or savory 
filling. 

Pur6e. Meats, vegetables, fish, etc., cooked in liquid 
till tender, then passed through a sieve. 



DEFINinON OF TERMS USED IN COOCEBT zvii 

Roux. A cooked mixture of butter and flour for 
thickening soups, sauces and gravies. 

Salmi. A rich stew of game, half roasted and then 
cut up and cooked in a sauce. 

SautL To cook till brown in a shallow pan with a 
little fat. 

Souffli. Puffed up and made light by use of well- 
beaten eggs. May be savory or sweet. 

VoIr<^U'Vent, A very light case of puff paste in which 
savories or sweets may be served. 



RUMFORD 

** The Wholesome ** 

Baking Powder 

Pore and Wholesome. Rumford is different from 
and superior to all other powders. It is made of 
the genuine Professor Horsford's phosphate (pre- 
pared especially and solely for this purpose), which 
has been commended by the most eminent physi- 
cians for its wholesomeness. The phosphates are 
natural components of meat and grains, and are 
food elements necessary for the maintenance of 
health. They are essential constituents of the hu- 
man body, and a deficiency results in loss of 
strength and consequent health. Fine wheat flour 
is deprived of phosphates in the bolting process, 
and is, therefore, lacking in this invigorating 
quality. Rumford Baking Powder adds these 
strengthening phosphates to the food. 

Perfect Bakhig Quality. The action of Rumford 
Baking Powder in the dough is thorough, making 
cake, biscuit, muffins, etc. of finer texture and flavor, 
and which will retain their fresh condition longer, 
than if made with ordinary baking powder or cream 
tartar. 

No Baking-Powder Taste. Rumford contains no 
alum or cream of tartar, and imparts no bitter or 
baking-powder taste to the food. It will not impair 
the most delicate flavoring used in cake, puddings, 
etc. Biscuit made with Rumford not only possess 
the natural flavor of the grain, but can be eaten hot 
without the discomfort which so often follows when 
they are made with yeast. 

Reasonable Price. By a specially improved process 
of manufacture we are enabled to sell Rumford at a 
cost much less than the ordinary high-priced baking 
powders. 



OUR GUARANTEE UIVDER THE PURE FOOD 
LAW IS ON FILE WITH THE SECRETARY OF 
AGRICULTURE, WASHINGTON, D.C., No. 221. 



The Rumford Complete 
Cook Book 



SOUPS 

SOUP STOCK 

To each quart of cold water allow one pound 
meat and bone in about equal proportions; one 
pint of cleaned vegetables, such as carrot, onion, 
celery, etc., cut in pieces; one bunch soup herbs, 
being a sprig of parsley, two bay leaves, and any 
dry herbs of which the flavor is desired, such as 
thyme, summer savory and marjoram; seasoning 
of salt and pepper to taste, together with a little 
celery seed or celery salt if fresh celery is not in 
season. 

Wipe the meat and cut into small pieces that it 
may more readily give off its juices; chop the bones 
and put them with the meat in the stock-pot; then 
add the vegetables and soup herbs. Pour the water, 
which must be cold,* over them and bring very 
slowly to the boiling point; skim if necessary and 
cook slowly for six hours, keeping the stock-pot 
closely covered. The stock must then be strained 
and left uncovered in a cool place till cold, that 
the fat may be more easily removed. The bones, 
meat and vegetables are sometimes cooked a second 
time with more water to make what is known as 
"second stock," not so strong as the first, but better 
than water for thick soups, sauces and gravies. 

If a highly flavored and colored stock is wanted, 
the vegetables and meat are sometimes browned in 
a little fat before the water is added, but this is not 
advisable where a clear stock is desired. Beef is the 

*Oold wAter draws the jmees out of the meat into the liquid. Boilinc 
water hardens the ouUide of the meat and prevenU the juices being given oC 



2 BUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

meat most commonly used for brown stock, and 
veal or chicken with a little ham for white stock. 
Cooked meats and the trimmings from steaks and 
roasts may be added to the other ingredients in the 
stock-pot, but have not the same food value as fresh 
meats. 

Stock should never be left to cool in the stock-pot, 
but always removed to a clean, cold vessel and left 
uncovered in a cool place till wanted for use. 

All marrow should be removed from the bones 
before cooking. It can be used to better advantage 
in other ways. 

For family use where fair sized joints are frequent, 
it should be rarely necessary to buy meat for soups, 
the bones and trimmings furnishing enough, with a 
judicious use of vegetables and flavorings, for ordi- 
nary use. The same rules, previously given, apply 
to the making of stock under these conditions if a 
little less water in proportion to the meat is used. 



Ox-tail Soup 

2 tablespoons drippings or 2 stalks celery, ^ 

lard. 2 quarts cold water or stock. 

2 ox-tails. 2 tablespoons pearl barley. 

1 large onion. 1 tablespoon flour. 

1 carrot. 2 tablespoons cold water. 

2 sprigs parsley. % cup sherry. 

1 bay leaf . Salt and pepper, or cayenne. 

Melt the fat and fry in it the carrot and onion 
cut into dice, also the ox-tails which have been cut 
in pieces. When brown add the water, also the 
celery, parsley and bay leaf tied together. When 
boiling put in the barley and simmer four hours. 
Remove the large bones, celery, parsley and bay 
leaf, and thicken the soup with the flour rubbed 
smooth with two tablespoons of cold water. Season 
rather highly, add the sherry, and serve. 



SOTTPS 3 

Mtttton Broth 

2 pounds neck o{ ttiUttoni 1 small onion. 

2 quarts cold water. 2 tablespoons barley. 

1 level teaspoon salt. 1 teaspoon chopped parsley. 

1 small turnip. Extra salt, and pepper to 

1 small carrot. taste. 

Wipe the meat, cut it into small pieces and place 
in a saucepan with the cold water; let it come slowly 
to the boiling point and then add the salt, which 
causes any scum there may be to rise. Simmer for 
an hour, skimming occasionally. Add the vegetables 
cut into dice, also the barley, and cook till the vege- 
tables are quite tender; season to taste. Add the 
chopped parsley just before serving. 

Turkey Soup 

1 turkey carcass. 1 stick of celery. 

Water to cover. ^ teaspoon extract of beef. 

1 small onion. 2 tablespoons rice. 

Seasoning to taste. 

Break the carcass in pieces and remove all the 
BtuflSng; add water to just cover, and simmer two 
hours with the celery and onion; then remove the 
bones, strain, and add the extract of beef, and then 
the rice which should have been previously cooked 
in boiling salted water. Let the soup reach boiling 
point, season and serve with croutons of fried bread. 



Tosuito Bisque 

6 fresh tomatoes or one can 2 tablespoons flour. 

tomatoes. 1 pint milk. 

1 small onion. % teaspoon baking soda. 

1 bay leaf. 1 teaspoon hot water. 

2 cloves. Salt and pepper to taste. 

1 sprig of parsley. \yi pints water if fresh 

2 tablespoons butter. tomatoes are used. 

Cut the tomatoes in slices and stew them till 
tender with the onion, bay leaf, cloves, parsley and 
water. If canned tomatoes are used omit the water. 



4 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

When tender pass all through a sieve, rubbing the 
pulp through also. Blend the butter and flour in a 
saucepan till smooth, but not browned; add the hot 
tomato and stir till boiling. Season, and after cook- 
ing five minutes put in the soda dissolved in a tea- 
spoonful of hot water. The addition of the soda 
neutralizes the acid of the tomato. Just before 
serving, add the milk previously scalded. 



Cream of Oyster Soup 

1 pint oysters. 1 tablespoon flour. 

1 quart milk. Salt and pepper to taste. 

1 tablespoon butter. 1 cup whipped cream. 

Chop the oysters, drain oflF the liquor and add to it 
an equal amount of water; heat slowly, skim well, 
then put in the chopped oysters and cook three 
minutes. Scald the milk, thicken with the butter 
and flour creamed together and add to the oysters 
with the seasoning. Put in the cream the last mo- 
ment before serving. 



Clam Chowder 

1J4 dozen clams chopped 1 sliced onion, 

fine. 1 quart milk. 

1 cup water. 2 tablespoons butter. 
3 large potatoes cut into 2 tablespoons flour. 

dice. 1 teaspoon chopped parsley. 

2 slices pork or bacon cut 1 teaspoon salt, 
into dice. J4 teaspoon pepper. 

8 crackers. 

Heat the pork or bacon and fry the onion in the 
fat; add the clam liquor, water and potatoes; cook 
until tender, season, and add the clams and milk. 
Cook ten minutes longer, then thicken with the 
butter and flour creamed together. Pour the chow- 
der over the crackers and sprinkle with the chopped 
parsley. 



SOUPS 6 

Clear Soup 

1 quart stock. A few slices of vegetables 

li ^und very lean beef. similar to those used in 

Wmtes and shells of 2 e^gs. the stock. 

Seasoning and garnish. 

Mince the meat finely, add the whites of the eggs, 
slightly beaten, also the shells, and mix with half a 
pint of the stock. When well blended, add with the 
vegetables to the remainder of the stock; whisk 
while heating, then when hot leave it over the fire 
without touching till it boils. Cook very gently 
five minutes longer; add half a cup of cold water, 
and after it has stood ten minutes strain through a 
fine cloth that has been wrimg out of hot water 
and spread over a bowl or attached to a soup stand. 
If the first liquor which runs through the cloth is 
not quite clear pass it through again. 

Remove any grease that may be on top of the soup 
by passing small pieces of blotting or tissue paper 
over it, so as to absorb the globules of fat; then 
season with salt, celery salt, cayenne, and lemon 
juice if the flavor is desired. Color, if necessary, 
with caramel (the soup should be the color of sherry), 
and serve plain or with any of the following gar- 
nishes: 



GARNISHES FOR CLEAR SOUPS 

For Julienne Soup: To each quart of clear soup 
add one-third cup each carrots and turnips, cut into 
strips an inch long and about the thickness of a 
match, and boiled in water till tender. 

For Brunoise Soup: To each quart of clear soup 
add two-thirds cup of mixed vegetables cut into one- 
fourth inch cubes, or cut into fancy shapes with a 
vegetable cutter, and boiled in water till tender. 

For Macaroni Soup: To each quart of clear soup 
add half a cup of macaroni cooked in boiling salted 
water till tender, and cut into rings. 



• BUlfFORD OOMFLETE COOK BOOK 

Fob Coxsoioi^ Botal: Make a custard, aDowing 
two tablespoons of milk to each ^g used. Beat the 
egg and nulk together and season to taste; strain the 
custard into a cup, and eHher jdace the cup in a 
saucepan of water over the fire and cook till the 
custard is set, or place the cup containing the custard 
in a vessel of water in the oven and cook till set. 
In either case, as soon as the custard is set, cut it 
into dice with a knife, or into any fancy forms for 
which you have cutters, and drop into the soup just 
as it is served. 

SOUP CRODTOVS 

Cut stale bread, without crust, into half-inch cubes 
and fry golden brown in hot fat. Or cut slices of 
buttered bread into cubes and crisp in a hot oven. 
Either drop into the soup just before serving or 
hand with it. 



MBMORAHDA 



xemorauda 



FISH 

TO BAKE FISH 

HAVE the fish well washed, and if it is haddock, 
small cod or any small whole fish, the black 
skin on the inside can be removed by rubbing 
briskly with a cloth or small brush dipped in salt. 
Dry the fiish and, if to be stuffed, prepare the stuffing 
by the rule given below; place it in the fish and sew 
up the opening with white thread. Lay the fish — 
either fiat or fastened with thread or skewers in the 
form of the letter S — in a well-greased baking-pan, 
preferably one kept for this purpose, dredge with flour 
and put a little dripping or bacon fat over the top. 
If the oven is very hot cover the fish with a greased 
paper during the first part of the baking to prevent 
its becoming too brown. Baste frequently with the 
fat that is in the pan, adding more if needed. Unless 
the fish is well basted it is likely to be dry* Serve 
with a sauce or gravy. 



Stuffing for Baked Fish 

3 slices stale bread. 1 tablespoon chopped pan- 
2 tablespoons chopped ley. 

suet. Salt and pepper to taste. 

1 small onion, finely 1 small egg, and a little milk 

minced. if needed. 

Soak the bread in cold water till quite soft, mash 
it till smooth and add to it the suet, onion, parsley, 
seasonings and egg. Moisten, if necessary, with a 
little milk — the mixture must be just firm enough 
to keep its shape — and fill the fish, sewing up the 
opening as soon as the stuffing is in place. This 
same mixture may be rolled into small balls, baked 
in the pan with the fish, and served as a garnish if 
preferred. 



10 BUMFOBD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

TO BOIL FISH 

Choose a small, compact fish or a firm slice of a 
large one. Wash thoroughly and wrap in cheese 
cloth, tying the ends of the cloth loosely. If a regu- 
lation fish kettle with drainer is used, it will be 
easier to remove the fish from the pan after cook- 
ing; or a plate may be placed in the pan and the fish 
laid on it. This prevents any possibility of the 
cloth sticking to the bottom of the pan and also 
makes it easier to remove the fish when cooked. A 
tablespoon of vinegar in the water will keep the fish 
a good color and make the flesh firmer. 

The water should be quite hot, but not boiling, 
when the fish is put in. If plunged into actively 
boiling water the skin is likely to crack. To pre- 
vent this still further the water should only simmer 
during the time of cooking. The average time 
allowed for the cooking of boiled fish is about six 
minutes to the pound, unless very thick, when ten 
minutes should be given. When small fish are boiled 
whole the heads are always left on, but the eyes 
removed. 

The fish usually boiled are cod, haddock, halibut, 
mackerel and salmon. 



TO 8AUT£ fish 

Clean the fish thoroughly, wipe dry and dip in 
either flour, egg and bread crumbs, or egg and com 
meal, and sautl in a shallow frjing-pan, having only 
a little fat in the pan. Cook till one side of the 
fish is brown, then turn with a fish turner, or a thin, 
flexible knife, and brown the other side. The fish 
may be seasoned either before or after cooking. The 
fat used may be either lard, butter, drippings, oil, 
or bacon fat. Small fish, such as pan-fish, por^ies, 
flounders, butterfish, or slices of larger fish — halibut 
or cod — are suitable for this method of cooking. 



FISH 11 

TO FRY FISH 

Clean the fish and wipe perfectly dry; then dip in 
beaten egg and afterwards in bread crumbs or corn 
meal; but preferably in the crumbs, patting these 
on well that no loose ones may fall off and bum in 
the fat; then plunge the fish, a few pieces at a time, 
in the fat which must be smoking hot and of which 
there must be sufficient in the pan to completely 
cover the fish. Cook golden brown, and drain well 
before serving. 

For fvll directions as to the preparation and heating 
of the fat, see instructions for Frying, page 29. 



TO BROIL FISH 

Wipe well, season with salt and pepper, and place 
between the wires of a well-greased broiler. Broil 
the flesh side first, then the skin side, turning often 
during the cooking process. 

The more oily fish, such as bluefish, salmon, her- 
ring and mackerel, are best for broiling, though 
other kinds are often cooked this way. When the 
drier varieties are broiled they must be well seasoned 
after cooking, and butter spread land lemon juice 
sprinkled over them just before serving. 



Baked Bluefish in Perfection 

1 large bluefish. Salt, pepper and a little 

% cup melted butter. onion juice. 

Juice of half a lemon. 

Split the fish down the back, wipe it well and lay 
in a greased baking-pan. Melt the butter and add 
to it the salt, pepper, onion and lemon juice, and 
pour a little of the mixture over the fish. Place in 
a hot oven and bake about half an hour, basting 
with the prepared butter every ten minutes. Serve 
very hot with or without a sauce. 



12 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

Perfect Fish Balls 

2 cups raw potatoes. 1 tablespoon butter. 

1 cup flaked codfish. }i teaspoon pepper, 

legg. 

Gut the potatoes in small pieces and cook with the 
fish till the potatoes are tender. Mash very thor- 
oughly till every lump is gone; add the butter, pep- 
per and egg, and beat again till the whole is light 
and creamy. Take up a little of the mixture at a 
time with a spoon that has been dipped in hot fat 
— this prevents the mixture sticking to the spoon — 
and drop into a pan containing plenty of smoking- 
hot fat. Cook golden brown — if the fat is the 
right heat this will not take more than a minute — 
drain well and serve with or without bacon. 



Fish Timbales 

2 cups raw cod, haddock 2 eggs. 

or halibut. Seasoning of salt, pepper, 
1 cup bread crumbs. lemon juice and Worces- 

}4 cup cream. tershire sauce. 

Chop, mince or grind the fish till quite fine; add 
the crumbs, cream and seasoning. Beat the whites 
and yolks of the eggs separately, the whites to a 
froth and the yolks until thick. Add the yolks first 
and mix them well in; then just before cooking, fold 
in the whites, mixing only enough to blend them 
with the other ingredients. Turn into well-greased 
moulds — plain ones are best, as the contents are 
likely to turn out better — and steam half an hour, 
either in a saucepan over the fire, or in a covered 
pan containing boiling water, in the oven. In either 
case let the water come halfway up the sides of the 
moulds and keep the pan closely covered. Serve on 
individual dishes with a sauce poured over them. 



FISH 13 



Codfish Fritters 

Strips of salt codfish. 1 egg. 

2 taolespoons flour. >< cup mil 

yi teaspoon salt. Frying fat, 



Gut the fish into strips about the size of the finger 
and soak over night. In the morning drain and dSy. 
Make a batter by putting the flour into a bowl with 
the salt, adding the yolk of egg and the milk, and 
beat well to remove all lumps. Beat the white 
of the egg to a stiff froth, add to the batter and dip 
the strips of fish into it, one at a time. Drop at 
once into hot fat, having enough fat in the pan to 
completely cover the fritters; cook golden brown and 
drain well before serving. 

Scalloped Oysters 

1 quart oysters. l}4 cups cream and milk 

2 tablespoons butter. mixed. 

2 tablespoons flour. ^ cup buttered crumbs. 

Salt and pepper to taste. 

Put the butter and flour together into a saucepan 
and cook till the butter is melted and blended with 
the flour; add the cream and milk, a little at a time, 
and cook till the mixture boils. Cook five minutes 
longer and then add the seasoning. 

Grease a baking-dish and put a little of the sauce 
in the bottom; cover with oysters which have been 
carefully examined and all bits of shell removed. 
Add more sauce and more oysters till the supply is 
exhausted, having sauce for the top layer. Cover 
with the buttered crumbs and bake about twenty 
minutes in a hot oven. Serve as soon as done that 
the oysters may not become tough. 

To Prepare the Cnmibs. Melt one tablespoon of 
butter in a frying-pan or saucepan and, when hot, 
add the crumbs to it, stirring till they have absorbed 
the butter. By this method the. butter is equally 
distributed instead of being in little patches, some 
of the crumbs greasy and others dry. 

This method may be used for scalloped fish. 



14 BUMFOBD OOICPLETE COOK BOOK 

KckdOfrtm 

2 doxon oyslefB. Fine braftd cnmlM. 

2 eggfi. Seasoning. 

Wipe each oyster dry and sprinkle with salt. Beat 
the eggs just enough to mix yolks and whites, and 
dip in the oysters so as to coat all parts with the 
^g. Lift them gently and let any excess of egg drip 
away; then drop each oyster into the crumbs, which 
should be spread on a paper or plate — preferably 
the former, as they will be easier to handle. When 
coated with crumbs, shake gently to remove any 
that may be loose, and set aside till all are done. 
Fry golden brown in smoking-hot fat. 

Always use bread crumbs for frying in preference 
to cracker crumbs. The latter absorb grease, while 
the bread crumbs throw it off. 

TO BOIL LOBSTER 

Put a handful of salt into a kettle of boiling water, 
into which place the lobster head first. Boil from 
twenty to thirty minutes, according to size. Too 
long or too rapid boiling will make the meat tough 
and stringy. 

In buying a lobster choose one that is heavy for 
its size; very large ones are likely to be tough. The 
male lobster is best for boiling, but the female is 
preferred for salads and sauces on account of the 
coral. 

To prepare the coral for use, remove it from the 
lobster and place on a tin in a moderately hot oven 
till quite dry, but not discolored; then pound in a 
mortar and sift. This will keep and is valuable as 
a garnish for salad and for use in sauce. 



TO BROIL LOBSTER 

Take a live lobster and sfdit down the back, be- 
ginning at the head, and remove the stomach and 



FISH 15 

intestines. Open fully and place on a broiler, cook 
the flesh side first; then the shell side; jcrack the 
large claws, and serve very hot with melted butter, 
lemon and Chili sauce. 



Lobster Croquettes 

The meat of one sood-sized % cup milk. 

lobster (boiled). A grating of nutmeg. 

1 tablespoon butter. Salt and pepper to taste. 

1 tablespoon flour. 1 teaspoon lemon juice. 

Egg and bread crumbs. 

Mince the lobster meat as finely as possible, adding 
the coral if there is any. Cream the butter and flour 
in a saucepan and, when mixed, add the milk, and 
cook to a stiff sauce; add the salt, pepper, lemon and 
nutmeg, and mix well. While still hot add the 
lobster and spread on a plate to cool, having the 
mixture about half an inch thick. When cold, shape 
into cutlet form, using the blade of a flexible knife 
and the fingers, or roll with the hands into the shape 
of very thick corks, or form with the hands or a tin 
mould into cones; dip in egg and bread crumbs as 
directed for the frying of fish (pag^ 30), and fry 
golden brown in smoking-hot fat. Drain well before 
serving. 

Stuffed Fillets of Fish 

2 tablespoons butter. Lemon juice. 

2 tablespoons flour. Seasoning to taste* 

f< cup milk or fish stock. 8 fillets of fish. 
% cup chopped shrimps, lobster or mushrooms. 

Melt the butter and blend the flour with it; pour 
in the milk slowly, stir until boiling, season and add 
the mushrooms or shrimp. Trim the fillets of fish 
neatly, spread with the mixture, fold and fasten 
with a small skewer. Bake in a moderate oven, 
covering the pan with greased paper, and adding 
one-half cup of water to prevent burning. Serve 
with horseradish sauce. 



16 BUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

Shrimp Patties 

1 cup picked shrimps, 1 egg yolk. 

either fresh or canned. 1 teaspoon lemon jidee. 
1 cup cream sauce. Salt and pepper to taste. 

Slight grating of nutmeg. 

Make the sauce by beating together in a sauce- 
pan two tablespoons butter with the same quantity 
flour; then stir in half a cup thin cream and the 
same of milk. Stir until boiling, cook five minutes, 
put in the seasonings, and the shrimps which may 
be divided if very large. Heat thoroughly and, just 
before serving, add the yolk of the egg. Fill little 
puff paste cases and serve. 

Uoulded Fish 

1 cup cold minced fish. 1 cup white sauce. 

2 eggs. 1 tablespoon parsley. 

First make the sauce by blending two tablespoons 
butter with the same quantity flour then stir in 
slowly one cup milk or cream, and cook three min- 
utes after the sauce boils. Season to taste with salt, 
pepper and lemon juice; add the parsley, fish and 
yolks of eggs. Beat the whites of tne eggs to a stiff 
froth and fold them in. Half fill small moulds with 
the mixture, and bake or steam half an hour. Serve 
with horseradish sauce. 



MBMORAHDA 



MBMOftAHDA. 



HEATS 

THE CHOICE OF MEATS 

IN considering how to buy meat, we must look at 
the relative cost as compared with the nutriment 
to be gained from the different cuts no less than 
at the qualities which go to make good meat. The 
most expensive portions of the animal are not neces- 
sarily the best, for more nutriment can be often 
obtained from a cheaper cut, provided proper care 
and time are taken for the cooking. Much imneces- 
sary expense is incurred in housekeeping, because 
meals are not planned sufficiently in advance to 
allow the cheaper cuts, which require long cooking, 
to be used. 

The meat of young animals is more tender but 
less nutritious than that from animals of mature 
growth. 

Beef and mutton — the standard meats — are 
always in season; but lamb is at its best in the sum- 
mer and fall, veal in the spring and early summer, 
while pork should be eaten only in the colder months. 

The best beef is the flesh of a steer about four 
years old. It should be bright red in color, firm, 
and marbled in appearance from the blending of fat 
and lean which shows even feeding and that the 
animal has not been rapidly fattened for killing. 
There should be also a fair proportion of creamy 
white fat next the surface. 

Lamb and mutton have a larger proportion of fat 
than beef, and the fat is harder. Good mutton is 
thick, the flesh fine grained and of a bright color. 
The strong mutton flavor, so often found, can be 
practically eliminated by the careful removal of the 
pink skin above the fat on the outer surface of the 
meat. 

Lamb is smaller and lighter in color than mutton. 
One distinguishing test between the two is that in 
lamb when the bone is broken or cut, as in the case 
of a leg or chops, it will be found red and rough; 

19 



20 BUMFOBD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

while as the animal grows older the blood recedes 
from the bones and leaves them white and smooth. 

The flash of veal should be pink and the fat white. 
If the flesh is white it denotes that either the animal 
was too young or was bled before killing. In either 
case when the flesh is white it is better avoided. 

Veal must be very thoroughly cooked; is difficult 
of digestion and contains less nutriment than beef, 
mutton or lamb. It is somewhat tasteless and re- 
quires more seasoning than other meats. 

Pork is another of the less wholesome meats. 
While obtainable during all seasons, it should be 
eaten only in winter, and then sparingly. Pork 
contains a larger proportion of fat than any other 
meat and requires long, slow cooking. The fat 
should be a clear white and the lean pink. Salt 
pork, bacon and ham are more wholesome than the 
fresh meat; and bacon fat is considered by physicians 
to be a more valuable and easily assimilated form of 
fat than any other. 

All meats should be removed from the wrapping 
papers as soon as received, wiped with a damp cloth 
and placed near, but not directly on, the ice. 

The processes most commonly employed for the 
cooking of meats are, roasting, broiling, stewing and 
boiling. 

TO ROAST MEAT 

First, wipe with a damp cloth, then skewer and 
tie if necessary to keep the meat in shape. For 
beef, mutton and lamb allow fifteen minutes for 
each pound and fifteen minutes over; for veal and 
pork twenty minutes to the pound and twenty 
minutes over. These close-grained meats are very 
indigestible unless well cooked. Some cooks flour 
meat before roasting. 

As the object in roasting is to keep the juices 
within the meat it is necessary to apply intense heat 
at first, so as to sear the outside and form a firm 
coating through which the juices can not escape. 
Therefore, when roasting, have the oven sufficiently 



MEATS 21 

hot when the meat goes in to accomplish this result. 
At the end of fifteen minutes the heat may be re- 
duced and the cooking proceed more slowly. The 
meat should be frequently basted with the fat that 
flows from it, to prevent the outside becoming burned 
or dry. It may also be dredged or sprinkled once 
or twice with flour and salt. Some cooks use covered 
roasting pans, claiming that the meat is kept more 
moist and the work of basting eliminated. 

TO BROIL MEAT 

Broiling is practically the same method as roast- 
ing, but is applied to smaller pieces of meat, only 
choice portions being suitable for this method of 
cooking. The fire must be hot and clear, the object 
being, as in roasting, to keep the juices in the meat 
and, therefore, it is necessary to sear the outside 
quickly. When this is done the meat should be 
moved a little farther from the fire and the cooking 
proceed more slowly. The broiler should be slightly 
greased and heated before the meat is placed on it. 

When broiling by gas have the burners lighted 
fully seven minutes before the meat is placed under 
them, that the heat may be sufficient to sear the 
outer surface at once; otherwise the meat is likely to 
be tough and dry. 

TO STEW MEAT 

In stewing, the less expensive parts of meat are 
utilized and, consequently, plenty of time must bo 
allowed for the cooking. If hurried, toughness is 
almost inevitable. By this method of cooking some 
of the juices are drawn out into the gravy. Meat 
may be stewed by itself or with the addition of vari- 
ous vegetables; it may be also enriched by frying 
both meat and vegetables in a little fat before adding 
water or stock, both color and flavor being improved 
if this is done. It is a decided advantage, when pos- 
sible, to prepare a stew the day before it is to be 
served, as the fat can be removed from the gravy 



22 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

more easily when cold. Stews made from meat 
which has been cooked once wUl naturally require 
more seasoning and flavoring with sauces and other 
condiments than when fresh meat is used. 

A stew is better and more savory if the gravy is 
browned; seasoned and thickened before the meat is 
added. 

TO BOIL FRESH MEATS 

In boiling, it is intended that the greater part of 
the juices shall be retained in the meat. Therefore 
place the joint, after wiping, in boiling water and 
keep it boiling about five minutes, with the object 
of hardening the surface and preventing the goodness 
being drawn out into the liquid. Twenty minutes 
to the pound and twenty minutes additional should 
be the time allowed. 

The water must be boiling (212 degrees) when the 
cooking begins, but 135 degrees (simmering heat) 
will suffice after a few minutes. Far more food is 
spoiled by the application of too much heat than 
too little. Very gentle bubbling will indicate the 
right temperature of the water. 

Meat is sometimes steamed by cooking in a closely 
covered steamer over boiling water. By this method 
there is very little weight and practically no good- 
ness lost, but a longer time — thirty minutes to the 
pound — must be allowed. 

In boiling salt meats, the method is changed, as 
they are put into cold water that the slow heating 
may draw out some of the salt. In the event of the 
meat being more than ordinarily salt, the first water 
is sometimes thrown away when it reaches boiling 
point, and fresh added. 

The liquor in which fresh meat has been boiled 
makes a good foundation for soup stock. That from 
salt meat, if not too salt, may be utilized for bean or 
pea soup. 

Broiled Lamb 

Slices of cold roast or 2 tablespoons olive oil. 
boiled lamb. 1 tablespoon lemon juice. 

Salt and pepper. 



MSATS 23 

Cut the slices of meat about half an inch thick 
from a part of the joint that is not too well cooked. 
Mix the oil and lemon juice together and let the 
meat stand in the mixture for an hour. The oil 
will enrich; and the lemon make the fibre of the 
meat tender. Place the slices in a broiler and cook 
about four minutes over a hot fire. Season rather 
highly, and serve with currant jelly or mattre d'hdtel 
sauce. 

Hot-Pot 

2 pounds of lamb suitable 4 onions. 

for stewing. Salt, pepper and a little flour. 

2 pounds potatoes. Water or stock. 

Cut the meat into pieces convenient for serving. 
Peel the potatoes and cut them into small, thick 
pieces; slice the onions thinly. Mix the salt, pepper 
and flour and roll each piece of meat in the mixture. 
Put a layer of potatoes in a deep dish or bowl (a 
wide-mouthed bean pot is a satisfactory dish), then 
a layer of meat, next sliced onion, repeating the 
process till the dish is filled. Have potatoes for the 
last layer and fill the dish with water or stock. 
Bake three hours in a moderate oven, adding more 
water if necessary. Serve in the dish in which it is 
cooked. 

Brown Stew of Lamb 

2 pounds of lamb. 2 tablespoons drippings. 

2 onions. ly^ tablespoons flour. 

2 carrots. 1^ pints water or stock. 

1 head celery or a little Salt and pepper, 
celery seed. 

Cut the meat into pieces convenient for serving. 
Peel the onions, scrape the carrots and wash and 
scrape the celery. 

Melt the drippings in a saucepan and fry the meat 
golden brown on all sides, removing as soon as 
browned; put in the flour and brown that also. Add 
the stock or water and stir till boiling; then put in 



24 RUMFOBD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

the meat and the prepared vegetables. Season to 
taste, and cook very slowly for two hours. 

Irish Stew 

2 pounds mutton suitable 6 small onions, 
for stewing. 1 small carrot. 

8 medium-sized potatoes. Salt and pepper. 
About 1}4 pints water. 

Cut the meat into pieces of convenient size for 
serving. Remove some of the fat and put the meat 
into a saucepan with the water which should be 
almost at the boiling point; add the onions peeled 
and cut into thin slices, also the carrot scraped and 
sliced. Cook very gently — the water should only 
simmer, for hard boiling would toughen the meat — 
and at the end of an hour add the potatoes, peeled 
and cut in thick pieces. Season to taste with salt 
and pepper, and continue to cook till the potatoes 
are tender. Then serve all together on one dish. 

Stuffed Shoulder of Mutton 

1 good-sized shoulder of Grated rind of half a lemon. 

mutton. 1 tablespoon chopped suet 
1 cup bread crumbs. or drippings. 

1 tablespoon chopped pars- Salt and pepper to taste. 

ley. 1 egg. 

Remove the blade bone from the shoulder, or have 
the butcher do it. Put the bread crumte into a 
bowl with the parsley, lemon, suet, salt and pepper, 
and mix them with the egg well beaten. Stuff the 
cavity from which the bone was removed, sew up 
the opening, and roast, basting frequently with a 
little fat or the meat will be dry. 

Allow fifteen minutes to the pound. Serve with 
a thick, brown gravy. Other dressings may be used 
if preferred. 

Beefsteak Pie 

1}4 pounds round steak. K teaspoon pepper. 
1 tablespoon flour. Plain paste. 

1 teaspoon salt. Cold water. 



MEATS 26 

Cut the meat in thin slices, and a little fat into 
very small pieces. Mix the flour, salt and pepper 
on a plate, and dip each piece of meat into it. Place 
a little fat in each piece of meat and roll up. Lay 
these rolls of meat in a pie dish, and fill the dish 
about two-thirds with cold water. Cover the dish 
and bake in a moderate oven for one and one-half 
hours. When the meat is tender, cover with a plain 
crust, the rule for which is given under "Pastry,** 
and bake half an hour longer. 



Pot Roast of Beef 

4 poinds top sirloin of Seasoning. 

beef. Onions, carrots and turnips. 

2 tablespoons flour. 3 tablespoons drippings or 

1 quart water. other fat. 

Have the meat cut in a thick, compact piece. If 
necessary, tie and skewer so that it will keep its 
shape. 

Melt a little fat in a saucepan (an old-fashioned, 
round bottom "Scotch bowl" is the best), and brown 
the meat on all sides; pour the boiling water over it 
and cover closely. Simmer as gently as possible for 
two hours; then season, and add the vegetables 
scraped or peeled as they need, and cut into pieces. 
Cook till the vegetables are tender; then remove the 
meat and vegetables from the pan and thicken the 
gravy with the flour mixed smoothly with a little 
cold water. If necessary add more water while the 
roast is cooking that there may be suflScient gravy 
to cover the vegetables. 



Cannelon of Beef 

2 pounds round steak. 2 tablespoons chopped pars- 

2 tablespoons bread lev. 

crumbs. 1 smaU chopped onion. 

Grated rind of half a 2 tablespoons melted butter. 

lemon. 1 egg. 

Salt and pepper to taste. 



26 BUMFOBD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

Chop the meat finely, or run it through a meat 
chopper; add the bread crumbs^ lemon rind, onion, 
parsley, butter, seasoning and beaten egg. Mix well 
and form into a long roll; lay on a greased tin and 
cover with greased paper. Bake three-quarters of 
an hour, basting every ten minutes with a little hot 
water and meltra butter or drippings. 

Turn onto a hot dish and serve with gravy or 
mushroom sauce. 

Beef Olives 

IX pounds venr thin 1 slice of onion, minced. 

round steak. 2 tablespoons beef drippings. 

yi cup rice. 2 tablespoons flour. 

1 tablespoon chopped pars- Salt ana pepper to taste. 

ley. j4 cup stoned olives. 

A pinch of sweet herbs. 1 pint water or stock. 

Cut the meat into pieces about four inches square. 
Chop the trimmings and add to the rice, parsley, 
herbs, onion and seasonings to form a stuffing. Put 
a spoonful of this mixture on each slice of meat, 
roll up and tie firmly. Heat the drippings and cook 
the rolls in them till brown; then remove from the 
pan, add the flour, mix smoothly and put in the 
water or stock, whichever is being used. Stir till 
boiling, replace the meat and cook very gently one 
and one-half hours. Five minutes before serving 
add the olives. Remove the strings from the meat 
before dishing. 

Veal Cutlets 

lyi pounds veal cutlet cut 1 small egg. 
thick. Bread crumbs. 

Seasoning. 

The meat may be either cut into pieces or left 
whole, as preferred. Season with salt and pepper 
and dip each piece into well-beaten egg; drain and 
drop onto a paper of bread crumbs; coat thoroughly 
and shake off all loose crumbs. Melt and heat a 
little fat in a fr3ring-pan, and cook the meat golden 
brown. Veal must always be thoroughly done. 
Serve with gravy or tomato sauce. 



memorauda 



MBMORAHDA 



FRYING 

FRYING is one of the most useful methods of 
cooking, especially of recooking or reheating 
such small combinations as rissoles, croquettes and 
small, made dishes which hardly need more than 
heating through, and browning for the sake of giving 
them an attractive appearance. It is, however, one 
of the least understood methods of cooking as well 
as one of the most poorly performed; hence the dis> 
credit into which it has fallen. 

The difference between frying and saut^ing should 
be clearly understood. The former needs suflScient 
fat to completely immerse the article to be fried; 
the latter requires only a little fat in the pan, but 
despite the seeming extravagance of "plenty of fat'! 
the former is, for most foods, the better and more 
digestible form of preparation. 

The very best medium for all frying is olive oil, 
but the price is prohibitive to most people. 

Cottonseed oil, if properly refined and carefully 
used, comes next, but it requires care to avoid un- 
pleasant odor from overheating and, again, many 
persons object to cotton oil because they have eaten 
food carelessly prepared with it. 

Lard is most commonly used, but is considered 
by many to be unhealthful. It seems, therefore, 
that the frying medium likely to be pleasing to all 
and free from most objections is good beef drippings 
which can be clarified at home, a rule for which is 
given on page 31. 

Cast steel or aluminum pans should be used as they 
retain the steady temperature required for frying. 
They should be fairly deep, and have straight sides. 
A frying basket made of wire mesh is exceedingly 
convenient where much frying is done. The advan- 
tage of the basket is that several articles can be 
lowered into and raised from the fat at one time, 
and the risk of breaking the food in lifting it from 

29 



30 BUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

the fat is lessened. A wire dipper or spoon must 
be provided if there is no frying basket. 

The temperature of frjring-fat is very important. 
As few cooks possess a fryometer the following sim- 

Ele tests will serve to decide when fat is at the proper 
eat for the purpose desired: 

For foods that have been previously cooked and 
need only reheating and browning, the fat should 
be so hot that a faint blue vapor is seen rising from 
it when the pan is held against the light. This 
applies when animal fat is used. Oil need not be 
quite so hot, and should be tested by frying a small 
piece of crust in it. If this quickly turns brown, 
the fat is hot; but if slow to take color, heat a little 
longer before beginning to fry. 

Doughnuts and crullers, being heavy and solid as 
compared with croquettes or other small fried foods, 
should be cooked in fat at a lower temperature. 
The best test is to put a small piece of dough in the 
pan and cook it. If it sinks to the bottom and al- 
most immediately reappears, increases in bulk and 
slowly browns, the remainder of the dough should 
be cooked. Do not attempt to cook too many 
crullers or doughnuts at one time as they cool the 
fat and, consequently, absorb grease; four or five 
are the most that should be cooked at one time. 
Drain as soon as done, on unglazed paper as this 
absorbs grease; then sprinkle with sugar or shake 
them with a little sugar in a paper bag. 

After frying any dough mixture the fat will appear 
cloudy from the flour that has fallen into it, but if 
a few raw potatoes are cooked in the fat the cloudi- 
ness will disappear. 

Fat should always be strained through a fine sieve 
or cheese cloth after using, to remove any foreign 
particles that have fallen into it from the food. If 
not removed these will bum and probably spoil the 
fat. 

To prepare meats, fish and croquettes for frying 
they should be coated with egg and bread crumbs. 
For this beat one egg yolk and white together and 



FBTING 31 

add a tablespoon of water, partly to thin it and 
partly to increase the bulk. Have ready on a paper 
or plate plenty of fine bread crumbs. Do not use 
cracker crumbs if it can be avoided as they absorb 
grease and do not give as pleasing a color. 

Having trimmed and shaped the article to be fried, 
lay it in the beaten egg and with a small brush 
cover it completely; lift with the blade of a knife 
and place upside down in the bread crumbs. If the 
knife blade has displaced any of the egg, brush over 
again. Toss in the crumbs till completely covered, 
then shake off those which are loose that they may 
not fall off in the fat and bum. Continue till all 
are coated, then pass the remaining crumbs through 
a sieve and put away till needed again. 

To prepare Beef Fat for Frying. Buy four pounds of 
soft flank fat, or ''cod fat" as it is sometimes called; 
do not get suet as it is too hard and also costs more 
than the flank fat. Cut into pieces the size of an 
English walnut and remove all flesh and gristle. 
Put into a large pan with a pint of water and cook 
fast, without a cover, till all the water has evapo- 
rated, when the liquid in the pan will be clear and 
like honey. As long as there is water remaining it 
will be thick and milky looking. Now cover the 
saucepan, and cook very gently till the pieces of skin 
and fat cells float on top of the clear fat. Strain 
and use for all frying, either plain or mixed with 
lard. If these directions are carefully followed the 
fat will be good as long as there is any remaining. 



MEMORAIIDA 



MEMORANDA 



MEMOBABDA 



POULTRY 

THE PREPARATION OF POXH^TRY 

POULTRY should be cleaned and dressed as soon 
as possible after being killed. Pinfeathers are 
best removed with a small knife or by the aid of a 
tong-shaped strawberry huUer. 

To draw the tendons from the drumstick, make 
an incision lengthwise between the bones of the leg, 
below the joint, while the foot is still attached to 
the body. Next, take a strong, thin skewer and 
pick up the tendons, one at a time, through the 
incision; hold the skewer, with the tendon on it, with 
the first two fingers and give a vigorous pull. The 
tendon should come out easily, and the process can 
be repeated till all are removed. There are seven 
small and two large tendons. If these are removed 
the drumstick is likely to be as tender as any portion 
of the bird. 

The feet may now be cut off a little below the 
joint, and long hairs on the body removed by 
singeing. Do this by holding it over a burner of 
the gas range or by applying a lighted taper or 
twist of lighted paper. The former method is the 
better one, as there is no danger of smoking the skin. 

To remove the down from a duck or goose, rub 
over with two teaspoons of alcohol, lay the bird in a 
dish or pan and set fire to the alcohol. The down 
will be burned off more quickly and thoroughly than 
by any other method. 

The bird is now ready for drawing and, especially 
if it is to be roasted, this had better be done at home 
as the butcher usually makes far too large an open- 
ing in the flesh. Make an incision in the skin below 
the breast bone and with the hand remove the 
gizzard, heart, intestines and liver, being very care- 
ful not to break the gall bag which is attached to 

35 



36 BX7MFOBD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

the latter, as it would cause the parts with which it 
comes in contact to taste bitter. Remove the lungs, 
which lie on either side of the backbone, also the 
kidneys, windpipe and crop. The latter is reached 
by inserting the fingers imder the skin of the neck 
after the head is cut off. The oil bag found at the 
base of the tail must also be removed. Wipe the 
bird well both inside and out. If there seems to be 
any indication that it has been kept too long, wash 
with water in which a little soda has been dissolved 
and put a small piece of charcoal in the body to 
absorb any possible odor. 

To Truss a FowL Draw the legs up close to the 
body and fasten in place with a skewer run through 
both drumsticks and the body. Do the same with 
the wings, skewering them so that they lie flat to 
the body. Cut the neck off close, fold the skin of 
the neck under and fasten it down with a small 
skewer. Cut a slit in the skin just above that made 
for the removal of the intestines, and pull the tail 
through this slit, fastening it in place with a long 
string, that the opening may be concealed. Now 
take the same string and twist it around the ends of 
the skewer that holds the legs; cross the string over 
the back of the bird and fasten to the other skewer, 
so as to hold all four joints in place and keep them 
from slipping. 

To Prepare a Bird for Broiling. Remove tendons 
and pinfeathers as directed in rule for preparation 
of poultry. With a sharp knife split the bird full 
length down the back, remove insides as before 
described, wipe, and before cooking cut through the 
wing and leg joints to simplify serving the bird at 
table. 

Dressing for Roast Chicken. Some claim that a 
stuffed chicken is a spoiled chicken and that the 
dressing absorbs much of the moisture and flavor 
from the flesh. If preferred, the dressing may be 
cooked separately and served with the bird. 



POULTRY 37 

Chestnut Dressiiig 

IK pounds French chest- 1 cup stale bread crumbs. 

nuts. % cup scalded milk. 

yi cup butter. 8alt and pepper to taste. 

Remove the shells from the nuts and blanch by 
pouring boiling water over them; allow them to 
stand five minutes when the brown skin can be 
removed with the fingers and a knife. Cook the 
nuts in boiling salted water till tender, which will 
probably take about half an hour; mash finely, add 
the butter and seasoning, also the crumbs which 
have had the scalded milk poured over them. Mix 
well, and use for stuffing either chicken or turkey. 

Plain Dressing for Chicken or Turkey 

1 cup stale bread crumbs Grated rind of half a lemon. 

or pieces of bread. 1 teaspoon mixed herbs. 

1 tablespoon chopped yi cup melted butter or suet. 

parsley. Salt and pepper. 

% cup scalding water or milk. 

^ Crumble the bread finely, add the parsley, lemon 
rind, herbs, salt and pepper. Chop the suet and 
add to the other ingredients; or if butter is used, 
melt it in the water or milk and add, mixing well. 
Fill the body of the bird with the dressing. 
For stuffing turkey double all the ingredients. 

Sage and Onion Dressing 

10 good-sized onions. 1 teaspoon powdered sage. 

\}i cups stale bread crumbs. Salt and pepper to taste. 

Peel the onions and cook till tender in boiling 
salted water, pouring off the first water and adding 
fresh after they have cooked ten minutes, to take 
away much of the strong taste and odor. When 
thoroughly cooked, drain and chop the onions finely; 
add the sage, bread crumbs and seasonings, and use 
as a stuffing for goose, duck or boned leg of pork. 
This may be also cooked in a separate tin in the 
oven and served with the meat, if preferred. 



38 BUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

Potato Dressing 

3 cups hot mashed potato. % oup finely-chopped salt 
1 cup stale- bread crumbs. pork. 

1 grated onion. 1 teaspoon powdered sage. 

1 egg. Salt and pepper to taste. 

Mash the potato quite finely^ add the bread 
crumbs, onion, pork, sage, salt and pepper and mix 
with the egg lightly beaten. Use as a dressing for 
goose, duck or pork. This dressing is milder than 
the one previously given. 



Chicken Loaf 

1 fowl. K cup cold water. 

2 tablespoons granulated 2 hard-cooked eggs. 

gelatine. Seasoning to taste. 

Boil a fowl — an old one will do — in suflBcient 
water to cover, till the meat is ready to fall from 
the bones. Cool the bird, strain, and continue to 
cook the liquor till it is reduced to three cupfuls. 

Remove all skin and bone from the fowl and lay 
the meat in a mould, lifht and dark meat alter* 
nately, adding the hard-cooked eggs cut in slices. 
Season the liquor and add to it the granulated gela- 
tine that has been soaked half an hour in a third of 
a cup of cold water. When thoroughly dissolved, 
pour the liquor over the meat and set away to 
harden. 



Chicken it la Stanley 

% cup butter. 1J4 cups water or stock. 

1 sliced onion. \% tablespoons flour. 

1 chicken. % cup cream. 

Salt and pepper to taste. 

Melt the butter and in it cook the onion, and 
chicken — which must be cut in pieces convenient 
for serving — for ten minutes. Remove the chicken 
and put in the flour, blend it smoothly with the 
butter, add stock or water, stir until boiling and 



POULTRY 39 

then put in the chicken and cook till tender. Add 
the cream and seasoning just before serving. 



Chicken k la Providence 

1 chicken. K c^P cooked carrot. 

2 cups stock. y^ cup cooked peas. 

2 tablespoons butter. 1 teaspoon choi^>6d parsley. 

2 tablespoons flour. 2 egg yolks. 

Seasoning. 

Boil the chicken gently till tender, seasoning while 
cooking; cut into pieces convenient for serving and 
set aside while the sauce is being prepared. 

Sauce. Melt the butter, add flour and blend 
smoothly; add the stock (liquor in which the chicken 
was cooked) and stir till boiling. Cook five minutes, 
put in the carrot and peas, also the yolks of eggs 
and seasoning. Pour over the chicken and sprinkle 
with chopped parsley. 



Italian Chicken 

1 chicken. 1 small onion thinly sliced. 

\% pints water. Seasoning of salt and pepper. 

yi cup olive oil. 1 egg yolk. 

2 teaspoons cornstarch. 

Cut the chicken into pieces as for a fricassee; 
cook till tender in just enough water to cover it^ 
adding salt and pepper when about half done. Re- 
move from the pan and let the chicken become quite 
cold; then dry each piece thoroughly. Heat half a 
cup of olive oil in a shallow frying-pan, add the 
onion to it and when smoking hot put in the chicken, 
a little at a time, and cook golden brown. When it 
is all cooked, add to the remaining oil a cup and a 
half of the liquor in which the chicken was cooked, 
bring to the boiling point and thicken with the 
cornstarch rubbed smooth with a little cold water. 
Cook five minutes, and just before serving add the 
yolk of the egg, and more seasoning if it is required. 
Pour the sauce over the chicken. 



40 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

Curried Chicken 

4 tablespoons butter. 1 teaspoon onion juice. 

3 tablespoons flour. ^ sour apple or 1 table- 

1 tablespoon curr^ powder. spoon lemon juice. 

2 cups milk or cmcKen Salt and pepper. 

stock. 2 cups chicken cut into dice. 

Melt the butter, add flour and curry powder and 
cook five minutes; then pour in the milk or stock, 
whichever is to be used, and stir constantly till the 
sauce boils; add the onion juice (obtained by press- 
ing a cut onion on a grater) and then put in the 
chicken and seasoning, and heat thoroughly. If 
apple is used, chop it finely and add as soon as the 
sauce boils; if lemon is to be the acid ingredient, do 
not put it into the sauce till the moment of serving. 

Serve with boiled rice in a separate dish. 

Chicken en Casserole 

1 young chicken. A few mushrooms, canned 

3 tablespoons butter. or fresh. 

1 small onion. 2 cups stock or water. 

1 smaU carrot. 3 potatoes. 

1 bay leaf. Salt and pepper to taste. 

3 tablespoons sherry. 

Clean, singe and cut the chicken into pieces con- 
venient for serving. Melt the butter in a small 
frying-pan, add the onion and carrot, both cut in 
thin slices, also the pieces of chicken, and cook all 
till golden brown, placing them in the casserole as 
they reach this stage. Pour the stock over them, 
put in the bay leaf, and cover closely. 

When nearly done, add the potatoes sliced, the 
mushrooms and seasoning. Cover, and finish the 
cooking. Add the sherry at the last moment before 
serving, and send to table in the casserole. 

Chicken Pot Pie 

1 chicken. Water or stock, about 1 quart. 

X pound pork. Seasoning. 

Dumplings. 

Cut the chicken into rather small pieces and the 
pork into dice. Lay them in a good-sized saucepan, 



POULTRY 41 

cover with water or stock and bring to the boiling 
point; keep closely covered and simmer from one 
to two hours, according to the age of the chicken. 
Season when about half done. Put in the dumplings 
thirty minutes before serving time, keeping the pan 
closely covered till they are done. Pile the meat in 
the centre of the dish and arrange the dumplings 
around it. Be sure there is plenty of gravy* 

Dumplings 

IK cups flour. 1 teaspoon Rumford Baking 

5^ teaspoon salt. Powder. 

Milk to mix to a soft dough that will just drop from the spoon. 

Sift the flour, salt and baking powder together 
twice; add the milk (it will probably take about 
two-thirds of a cup), mix thoroughly but quickly, 
and drop by small tablespoonfuls into the hot gravy. 
Cook as directed in rule for Chicken Pot Pie. Some 
prefer to cook the dumplings separately and thicken 
the chicken gravy with a little flour and butter 
rubbed smoothly together. 

Pilau of Fowl (an Indian dish) 

1 fowl. 1 small onion. 

1 quart white stock. 1 cup rice. 

yi cup butter. SsJt and cayenne to taste. 

1 ounce sweet almonds. 1 inch stick cinnamon. 

12 seeded raisins. 2 cloves. 

Clean and truss the fowl and cook in the stock for 
one hour. While this is cooking, heat the butter 
and fry in it till golden brown, the almonds blanched 
and shredded, the onion peeled and sliced, the 
raisins, cloves and cinnamon. When brown, remove 
these from the pan and fry the rice in the same 
butter till golden brown. Drain off the superfluous 
butter and add the rice and other ingredients to the 
pan containing the chicken and stock. Cook till 
rice and chicken are both tender; then place the 
whole on one dish and garnish with slices of fried 
bacon. 



42 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

TO ROAST DUCK 

A domestic duck requires almost twice as much 
cooking as a wild duck. The latter should always 
be rare and will take about thirty minutes in a hot 
oven. Wild ducks should always have strips of 
bacon or salt pork laid across the breast while roast- 
ing, to keep them moist. Both kinds need thorough 
basting. 

For dressing see recipes for Sage and Onion Dress- 
ing or Potato Dressing. 

Wild ducks are never stuffed. 

Braised Duck 

1 good-sized duck — an 1 sliced onion* 

old one will serve. 1 bay leaf. 

yi pound fat salt pork. A little parsley. 

1 carrot cut in dice. Salt and cayenne to taste. 

Cut the pork into small pieces and fry; add the 
vegetables, bay leaf and parsley, and cook five min- 
utes. Put in the duck, either trussed as for roasting 
or cut into joints. Cook in the fat till browned; 
then place in a baking-dish or casserole. Pour the 
vegetables and fat over it and add three cups of 
boiling water. Cover closely and cook in a moderate 
oven till tender, adding more water if necessary. 
Dish the bird, and thicken the gravy with two 
tablespoonfuls each of fiour and butter rubbed 
smoothly together. Season highly, and serve with 
currant jelly or apple sauce. 

Potted Pigeons 

4 pigeons. 1 slice fat salt pork. 

1^ pints water or stock. 2 tablespoons butter. 
1 stalk of celery. 2 tablespoons flour. 

Salt and pepper. 

Clean and truss the birds as for roasting. Cut the 
pork into dice, try out the fat and brown the birds 
in it. Put them in a casserole or baking-dish, add 
the celery, seasoning and stock; cover closely and 
cook about two hours. Remove the pigeons to the 
serving dish, and thicken the gravy with the butter 



POULTRY 43 

and flour rubbed smoothly together. Pour the gravy 
over the birdS; first having removed the celery. 



Fried Chicken 

1 chicken. A little cold water. 

Salt, pepper and a little % cup lard and butter 

flour. mixed. 

Clean the chicken, remove pinfeathers and oil 
bag, and cut into convenient pieces for serving. Dip 
each joint into the water and then into the flour, 
salt and pepper sifted together, shaking off all that 
does not cling to the chicken. Heat the butter and 
lard in a frymg-pan and cook the pieces of chicken 
slowly that they may be done through, turning often 
while cooking. Keep hot till all are done, and serve 
with white sauce or brown gravy. 



Fricassee Chicken 

1 good-sized chicken. Salt and pepper. 

1 small onion. A little chopped parsley. 

A few slices of salt pork. A few mushrooms (these can 

2 tablespoons flour. be omitted). 

1 tablespoon butter. Boiling water to cover. 

Cut the chicken into good-sized pieces and wipe 
with a damp cloth. Cut the pork small and try it 
out in a saucepan, and when the fat runs freely put 
in the chicken, a few pieces at a time, and cook till 
slightly colored, but not browned. Put the tougher 
parts of the bird at the bottom of the pan, then add 
the onion and cover with boiling water. Cover 
closely^ and cook very slowly till tender, adding the 
seasoning at the end of an hour. It is not possible 
to give the exact length of time required for the 
cooking as some chickens take longer than others. 

A few minutes before serving, remove the meat 
from the pan, and thicken the gravy with the butter 
and flour rubbed smoothly together. Cook five 
minutes after adding the thickening, then pour the 



44 KUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

gravy over and around the chicken. If mushrooms are 
used, add them when the cooking is about half done. 
Sprinkle the parsley over the chicken after dishing. 



Chicken Mould 

1 cup cold chicken. 1 egg. 

1 cup chicken stock or >^ 2 level tablespoons gelatine. 

stock and half cream Seasoning. 

or milk. 

Chop the chicken finely and pass through a sieve; 
season delicately and. add to it the egg, yolk and 
white beaten separately, and the stock in which the 
gelatine has been dissolved. Turn into a mould and, 
when cold; turn out and slice thinly. 



MBMORAIIDA 



VEMORAirDA 



FISH AND MEAT SAUCES 

Oyster Sauce 

1 pint of oysters. 1 cup milk. 

3 tablespoons butter. Salt, pepper and lemon juice 

3 tablespoons floor* lor toe seasoning. 

Scald the oysters in their own liquor; chop them 
coarsely and reserve three-fourths cup of the liquor. 

Blend the butter and flour in a saucepan without 
browning, add the milk and oyster liquor and stir 
till boiling; cook five minutes, add the seasoning 
and oysters, and cook just long enough to let them 
get thoroughly hot. 

Bechamel Sauce 

2 tablespoons butter. 1 cup stock. 

2 tablespoons flour. X ^^P cream. 

Seasoning to taste. 

Melt the butter, add the flour and blend till smooth, 
without browning. Add the stock a little at a time, 
stirring constantly till all is used. Cook five minutes, 
season, and add the cream just before serving. 

Mint Sauce 

j^ cup fresh mint leaves. 2 tablespoons sugar. 
^ cup vinegar. 

Wash the mint well before stripping the leaves 
from the stalks, dry thoroughly and chop finely. 
Add the vinegar and sugar, and let the sauce stand 
till the sugar is dissolved. Serve with roast lamb. 

Cucumber Sauce 

2 cucumbers. 2 tablespoons olive oil. 

}i teaspoon onion juice. 1 tablespoon vinegar. 

Salt and pepper to taste. 

Peel the cucumbers and either grate or chop them 
finely; drain well to get rid of all the moisture pos- 

47 



48 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

Bible and add the onion juice, oil, vinegar and season- 
ings beaten together. Serve as soon as made. 

This sauce is good with either broiled or fried 
fish, or cold meats. 

Mushroom Sauce 

IK tablespoons butter. 1 bay leaf. 

2 tablespoons flour. 1 slice onion. 

l}4 cups brown stock. 1 cup mushrooms. 

Cook the butter and flour together till brown, add 
the stock, onion and bay leaf, and cook ten minutes. 
Remove the bay leaf and onion and add the mush- 
rooms. If canned mushrooms are used cut them in 
halves; if fresh ones, they must be peeled, coarsely 
chopped and cooked five minutes in a little butter 
before adding to the sauce. Season and serve* 

Maitre d'Hotel Sauce 

K cup butter. 1 tablespoon lemon juice. 

10 drops onion juice. 1 tablespoon chopped psursley* 

Salt and pepper. 

Beat the butter to a cream as for a cake, add 
the lemon juice a little at a time and, when well 
blended, stir in the parsley, onion juice and season- 
ing. Form into a ball or &a,t cake and set aside to 
chill before serving. 

B6amaise Sauce 

4 egg yolks. 1 tablespoon of plain or 

4 tablespoons oil or melted tarragon vinegar, 

butter. 2 tablespoons hot water. 

Salt and pepper. 

Put the well-beaten yolks of eggs in a bowl and 
stand this in a saucepan of hot water over the fire. 
Add the oil or butter very gradually, stirring all the 
time. Next pour in the two tablespoonfuls of hot 
water and continue to stir" till thick and smooth. 
Remove at once from the heat and add the vinegar. 



FISH AND MEAT SAUCES 49 

salt and pepper. This sauce needs most careful 
watching while being made. 

Horseradish Sauce 

2 tablespoons butter. Salt, pepper and lemon juice. 

2 tablespoons flour. 2 level tshblespoons grated 
lj4 cups milk or fish stock, horseradish, 

or part of each. 1 egg yolk. 

Blend the butter and Sour in a saucepan till 
Bmooth, add the liquid, a little at a time, and stir 
till boiling. Season with the salt; pepper and lemon 
juice and cook a few minutes. Just before serving, 
add the horseradish and yolk of the egg. If grated 
horseradish can not be obtained, add one teaspoon 
of evaporated horseradish which has been soaked 
for a few minutes in a tablespoon of cold water. 

Piquante Sauce 

1 small onion. 1 teaspoon chopped parsley. 

2 tablespoons butter. 1 teasp^^n made mustard. 
2 tablespoons flour. A little chopped cucumber 
1 cup stock. pickle. 

1 teaspoon vinegar. Salt and pepper to taste. 

Melt and heat the butter in a saucepan, add the 
onion, chopped small, and fry golden brown in the 
butter; then put in the flour and stir till perfectly 
smooth; add the stock slowly and stir till boiling. 
Cook five minutes, season, and add the vinegar, 
mustard, parsley and pickle. 

Serve with boiled or baked fish. 

Tartare Sauce 

1 cup mayonnaise dressing. 1 teaspoon finely-chopped 

(Recipe given under capers. 

''Salad Dressings.'') 1 teaspoon finely-chopped 
1 teaspoon made mustard. pickles. 

1 teaspoon finely-chopped >^ teieuspoon onion juice. 

parsley. 

Add all the ingredients to the mayonnaise in the 
order given; stir well and serve very cold. 



50 BUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

Tomato Sauce 

y^ can tomatoes. Salt and pepper. 

yi a small onion. 1 bay leaf. 

1 sprig parsley. 2 tablespoons butter 

2 tablespoons flour. 

Put together in a saucepan the tomatoes, onion, 
parsley and bay leaf; cook gently for twenty min- 
utes, then rub through a sieve. Press all the pulp 
possible through the sieve and scrape off all that 
clings to the under side. Melt the butter in an- 
other pan, add the flour, and when these are smooth 
add the strained tomato slowly, stirring constantly 
to prevent the sauce being lumpy. Cook five min- 
utes after the sauce boils; add seasoning, and serve. 

Some cooks add a little sugar to the sauce to neu- 
tralize the acid. One-sixth teaspoon bicarbonate of 
soda dissolved in a teaspoon of cold water and 
added to the sauce will serve the same purpose. 

Parsley Sauce 

2 tablespoons butter. 1 teaspoon lemon juice. 
2 tablespoons flour. Salt and pepper to taste. 

1 cup milk. 2 tablespoons chopped parsley. 

Put the butter and flour together in a saucepan, 
and blend thoroughly without coloring. Add the 
milk, a little at a time, stirring constantly till the 
sauce boils. Cook five minutes; add the salt, pepper 
and lemon juice and, just before serving, the chopped 
parsley. 

To Prepare the Parsley. Wash and dry thoroughly 
and remove all stalks. Chop finely and wash again, 
placing the chopped parsley in the comer of a cloth 
and twisting the cloth that none may escape, then 
hold under the water faucet and press the parsley 
with the thumb and finger to get rid of the excess of 
green coloring matter liberated by the chopping; 
otherwise this would make the sauce a dull, rather 
dirty-looking color, instead of perfectly white with mi- 
nute particles of green parsley distributed through it. 



MEMORANDA 



MEMOfiAIDA 



EHTH^ES AHD CHEESE DISHES 

Ham and Macaroni Scallop 

18 sticks of macaroni. 1 cup milk. 

1 cup minced ham. % teaspoon pepper. 

2 tablespoons butter. 2 tablespoons grated cheese. 

1 tablespoon flour. }^ cup stale bread crumbs. 

1 tablespoon butter. 

Break the macaroni into' short lengths and cook 
it in boiling salted water till tender, which will 
probably take about thirty minutes. 

Make a sauce by blending the butter and flour 
smoothly, adding the milk and stirring till the mix- 
ture boils; then add the pepper, but no salt as the 
ham will sufficiently salt the mixture. Grease a baking- 
dish and place in it alternate layers of macaroni, 
ham and sauce, sprinkling a little of the cheese over 
each layer of the macaroni. Melt the other table- 
spoon of butter, add the crumbs to it, and stir till 
they have absorbed the butter. Spread over the 
ingredients in the dish, and bake till golden brown. 

Fricassee of Liver 

2 pounds calf's liver. 1 small onion. 

>^ pound fat salt pork. 1 tablespoon chopped 

1 tablespoon butter or parsley. 

drippings. Salt and pepper to taste. 

' ^ Cut the liver into rather thick slices and the pork 
into dice. Melt the butter in the upper part of a 
double boiler, lay the slices of liver in it, and put in 
the diced pork; slice the onion and add with the 
parsley and seasoning. Cover closely and set the 
saucepan over the lower part of the boiler which 
contains boiling water, place at the back of the range 
where it will keep hot, without boiling, for an hour; 
then increase the heat and cook an hour longer. 
Thicken the gravy with a tablespoon each of butter and 
flour rubbed smoothly together, and serve very hot. 

53 



54 BUMFOBD COMPLETE COOK BOOS 

Heat Fdttera 

1 cup finely-chopped cold 1 tablespoon chopped parsley; 

meat: beef, lamb or 1 cup flour. 

chicken, etc. 1 egg. 

8alt, pepper and a little 1 teaspoon Rumford Baking 

onion juice, lemon, Fowder. 

mint or other flavor- 1 cup milk. 

ing. Frying fat. 

Season the meat to taste, varying the seasoning 
according to the kind of meat. For chicken a little 
lemon rind may be added, and for lamb a little 
finely-chopped mint; add the parsley in either case. 
Make a batter with the flour, baking powder, egg 
and milk, to which add the seasoned meat, and drop 
by spoonfuls into the hot fat. Fry golden brown 
and drain well. Serve hot with or without a sauce 
or gravy. 

Corned Beef Croquettes 

2 tablespoons butter. 2 tablespoons chopped 
2 tablespoons mashed parsley. 

potato. 1 well-beaten egg. 

% cup cream. Egg and bread crumbs. 

\yi cups finely-chopped Pepper to taste. 

corned beef. Salt (if necessary). 

Melt the butter in a saucepan, add the mashed 
potato and cream, and heat thoroughly. Next, put 
in the meat, parsley and seasoning, and, lastly, the 
beaten egg. Spread the mixture on a plate and 
when cool shape into croquettes, either in the form 
of large corks or a cone; coat with beaten egg and 
bread crumbs^ and fry golden brown in smoking-hot ' 
fat. 

Blanquette of Veal 

\% tablespoons butter. 2 cups cooked veal cut into 

1% tablespoons flour. dice. 

1 cup stock. 12 mushrooms. 

yi cup cream. 2 egg yolks. 

Seasoning. 

Blend the butter and flour together without 
browniug; add the stock and cream, and cook till 



ENTREES AND CHEESE DISHES 55 

the sauce thickens. Put in the meat and mush- 
rooms (canned ones will do), and heat. Just before 
serving stir in the egg yolks and cook one minute. 
Season, and serve very hot. 

Veal Klopps 

2 cups finely-minced veal. Salt and pepper to taste. 
Juice of 1 small onion. A little grated lemon rind. 

The unbeaten whites of 3 eggs. 

Add the onion juice, seasoning and lemon rind to 
the minced veal, and form a paste of the seasoned 
meat with the whites of eggs. Shape with the 
hands into very small balls and, when all are ready, 
drop a few at a time into boiling salted water in a 
shallow pan and cook gently for five minutes. Serve 
on rounds of buttered toast. Cover with either a 
tomato sauce or rich white sauce. 

Chicken Livers with Bacon 

1 dozen livers. Seasoning of salt, pepper and 
Slices of bacon. lemop juice. 

Clean the livers (carefully remove the gall bag if 
this has not already been done), and cut them in 
halves, wrapping each piece in a slice of thinly cut 
bacon. Secure the bacon with a small skewer or 
wooden toothpick; lay on a broiler and place in a 
baking-pan to catch the fat. Cook in a hot oven 
till the bacon is crisp, turning once or twice during 
the cooking. Season, and sprinkle with lemon juice 
before serving. 

Chicken Chartreuse 

2 cups cold boiled rice. A little erated lemon rind. 
\}4 cups minced chicken. Salt and pepper to taste. 
1 tablespoon chopped parsley. Cream sauce or gravy. 

Grease a plain mould and line throughout with 
rice, pressing it with a spoon to make sure it clings. 
Add the parsley and lemon rind to the minced 
chicken, with salt and pepper to taste, and fill the 



66 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

hollow inside the lining of rice with the seasoned 
meat. Cover with a little more rice, and steam 
three-<iuarters of an hour. Turn onto a hot dish, 
and cover completely with sauce or gravy. 

Stuffed Peppers 

IK <^p8 cold cooked ^ cup stale bread emmbs. 

chicken. 2 tablespoons melted butter. 

Salt, pepper and a little 1 teaspoon minced parsley. 

grated lemon rind. 6 green peppers. 
yi pmt chopped oysters 

with their liquor. 

Mince the chicken finely; add the salt^ pepper and 
lemon rind, also the oysters, butter, crumbs and 
parsley. Cut a slice from the stem end of the pep- 
pers, remove all the seeds and white fibre, and fill 
with the chicken mixture. Bake half an hour in a 
moderate oven. Tomatoes may be stuffed with the 
same filling, if desired. 



Broiled Sweetbreads 

1 pair sweetbreads. 2 tablespoons butter. 
Juice of half a lemon. Salt and cayenne. 

Put the sweetbreads in cold water and let them 
stand an hour; then drain and place in a saucepan 
containing a pint of boiling water, the juice of half 
a lemon and a little salt. Cook gently for twenty 
minutes and again plunge into cold water that the 
sweetbreads may be white and firm. Dry, split, 
season lightly and broil over a clear fire about five 
minutes. Serve very hot with maltre d'hdtel sauce. 

Cheese Puffs 

2 well-beaten eggs. 1 teaspoon Rumford Baking 
^ cup flour. Powder. 

y^ cup grated cheese. 1 scant cup of milk. 

Salt and pepper to taste. Frying fat. 

Beat the eggs well and add the milk. Sift to- 
gether the flour, baking powder and seasoning; add 



ENTRIES AND CHEESE DISHES 57 

the cheese and mix to a stiff batter with the milk 
and eggs. Beat well, and drop by spoonfuls into 
hot fat. Fry golden brown, drain and serve. 

Cheese Patties 

A little plain paste. K cup grated cheese. 

2 tablespoons butter. 1 teaspoon Rumford Bak- 

2 small eggs. ing Powder. 

% cup bread crumbs. l^ cup milk. 

Salt and cayenne to taste. 

Roll the paste thinly, cut out, and line small tins. 
Beat the butter to a cream, add the eggs slightly 
beaten, bread crumbs, cheese, baking powder and 
seasoning; mix with the milk, and put a spoonful in 
each tin. Bake about fifteen minutes in a hot oven. 

Escalloped Cheese 

2 cups stale bread cut into 1 pint milk. 

dice. 2 eggs. 

1 cup grated cheese. Salt and pepper to taste. 

Put the bread and cheese into a baking-dish, in 
alternate layers, until the dish is about two-thirds 
full. Beat the eggs and add to the milk with the 
seasoning — not forgetting that cheese is sometimes 
quite salt — and pour over thfe cheese and bread. 
Bake half an hour in a moderate oven. 

Cheese Toast 

1 tablespoon butter. 1 cup milk. 

\]4 tablespoons flour. 1 cup grated cheese. 

Salt and cayenne. Slices of buttered toast. 

Make the toast first and keep it hot while prepar- 
ing the sauce. Melt the butter, add the flour and 
blend smoothly; season, and put in the milk a little 
at a time, stirring constantly. After cooking five 
minutes put in the cheese and, when melted, pour 
over the toast, and place in a hot oven for five 
minutes before serving. 



58 BUMFOBD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

Deviled Cheese 

IK cups grated cheese. 1 teaspoon Worcestershire 
2 tablespoons olive oil. sauce. 

2 tablespoons vinegar. Salt and pepper to taste. 

1 teaspoon dry mustard. Crackers. 

Mix the cheese, mustard, salt and pepper; add the 
oil, beat until creamy and then mix in the vinegar 
and sauce. Spread on hot, toasted crackers, or 
on ordinary crackers or toast, and heat for five 
minutes in a quick oven. 

Macaroni au Gratia 

yi pound macaroni. 6 tablespoons grated cheese. 

1 cup white sauce. Salt and pepper to taste. 

Break the macaroni into convenient lengths and 
cook in boiling salted water till tender, which will 
take from half to three-quarters of an hour. Drain 
thoroughly, and put a layer at the bottom of a deep 
baking-dish. 

Make the sauce by blending in a saucepan three 
level tablespoons of butter with the same quantity 
of flour; add slowly one and one-half cups of milk 
and stir till the sauce boils. Cook three minutes 
and season with salt and pepper. 

Add two-thirds of the cheese to the sauce, and put 
a layer over the macaroni in the dish. Proceed in 
this way, first macaroni, then sauce, till the dish is 
full, having sauce for the last layer. Sprinkle the 
remainder of the cheese over the top. Bake in a 
moderate oven about three-quarters of an hour. 

Swedish Timhales 

^ cup flour. 1 egg. 

}4 teaspoon salt. }i cup milk. 

1 teaspoon sugar. 1 tablespoon olive oil. 

Sift together the flour, salt and sugar, and mix to 
a smooth batter with the egg, milk and oil. Let the 
mixture stand an hour before using. Heat a tim- 
bale iron in hot frying-fat and dip it into the batter, 



ENTREES AND CHEESE DISHES 59 

taking care not to allow the batter to come over the 
top of the iron. Lower the iron into hot fat and fry 
golden brown. It is best to have the batter in a 
cup when dipping the timbale iron into it. If the 
iron is either too hot or too cold, the batter will 
drop off. It is only by practice that the right heat 
can be judged. 



Mushroom Filling for Timbales 

2 cups mushrooms cut in 1 tablespoon cornstarch or 

small pieces. flour. 

3 tablespoons butter. 1 cup cream or milk. 
Salt and pepper to taste. 1 tablespoon sherry. 

Cook the mushrooms in the butter till tender, add 
the salt, pepper and flour or cornstarch, mix smoothly 
and put in the cream or milk; stir till boiling and 
then cook five minutes longer. At the iioment of 
serving add the sherry and fill the timbale cases. 



Sweetbread and Mushroom Filling 

J^ pound mushrooms. 1^ cups milk, or milk and 

3 tablespoons butter. cream. 

2 tablespoons flour. 1 sweetbread. 

Salt, pepper and a little Worcestershire sauce for seasoning. 

Cook the mushrooms in the butter till tender, add 
the flour and, when smoothly blended, the milk and 
cream. Stir till boiling, and cook five minutes. 
Add the sweetbread, which has been cooked and 
cut into dice, to the other ingredients, with the sea- 
soning, and fill the timbale cases just before serving. 



Oyster Filling 

3 tablespoons butter. 1 cup milk and cream mixed. 

3 tablespoons flour. Salt and pepper. 

1 pint solid oysters. 1 teaspoon of lemon juice. 

Scald the oysters in their own liquor after picking 
them over carefully. Blend the butter and flour in 



60 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

a saucepan till smooth, add the milk and cream 
slowly, and stir till boiling. Cook five minutes and 
then put in the oysters with as much of the liquor 
as will make the sauce the consistency of thick 
cream. Season, add the lemon juice, and fill the 
timbale cases just before serving. Either of these 
three fillings may be served on toast instead of in 
the timbale cases. 



MEMORANDA 



MEMORANDA 



VEGETABLES 

THE PREPAIUTION AlfD COOKING OF VEGETABLES 

THE usual method of cooking vegetables in a 
large quantity of water, which is afterwards 
thrown away, is not to be recommended, as it means 
the loss of much valuable saline matter as well as 
sugar. 

Where the cooking liquor is not used, with such 
vegetables as peas, turnips, beans, etc., it is well to 
add a little sugar while cooking, to replace that 
which is lost. Root vegetables are all improved by 
the addition of a little butter when being served. 

It is difficult to give a definite time for the cook- 
ing of either root or green vegetables, as it depends 
largely on their age and freshness. Cook all green 
vegetables rapidly, putting them, after washing, into 
boiling salted water. Cook without a cover as this 
preserves the color. Some cooks attain this end by 
putting a little soda in the water, but this is not 
advisable. As soon as tender, remove from the 
water because too much cooking causes the flavor to 
deteriorate. 

The exception to the rule of cooking green vege- 
tables in boiling water is spinach, which requires no 
water other than that which clings to the leaves 
after washing. 

Cabbage, Catiliflower, Dandelion and Beet Greens, 

wash thoroughly, remove dead leaves and stand in 
cold, salted water for an hour. This removes any 
insects that may be hidden among the leaves. Cab- 
bage is usually cut into quarters when being cleaned; 
cauliflower is sometimes divided into small flower 
stalks, and when this is not done it is wise to make 
a cross-cut in the stalk; otherwise, being hard, it is 
not likely to be sufficiently cooked as soon as the 
rest of the plant. 

Spinach requires more washing than any other 
vegetable, because it grows in a sandy soil, close to 

63 



64 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

the ground. Remove roots and dead leaves, then 
wash by placing in a large vessel of cold water, toss 
about and then transfer to fresh water. Repeat this 
process till all sand is removed and the last water 
is quite clear — from six to ten washings are usually 
required. 

Beets need no preparation before cooking, and 
must be boiled without even cleaning. The tops 
should be cut off several inches above the beets and 
the beets cooked till tender in boiling water; young 
beets require cooking about an hour, old ones sev- 
eral hours. 

Summer Squash may be cooked without peeling if 
very young, but if the skin is at all likely to be 
tough, it should be removed. Drain the squash 
very thoroughly after cooking; or put it in a cloth 
and wring the ends in opposite directionau 

Hubbard Squash may be baked, boiled or steamed, 
the former being the better method as it leaves the 
«quash drier. 

To Bake Squash. Cut it into large pieces, ,place 
skin side up in a baking-pan and cook till tender. 
Scrape the flesh from the skin, and se^aaoxi to taste. 

Eggplant should be cut into thick slices, dipped 
dn b^ten egg and bread crumbs and fried in a little 
drippings or bacon fat. 

To Stuff and Bake Eggplant. Boil it for half an 
hour, then cut in halves, scoop out the fleshy part, 
chop finely, mix with half its bulk of bread 
tsrumbs, a little onion juice, chopped parsley or any 
other reasoning desired; replace the mixture in the 
shell and bake the whole three-quarters of an hour. 
A little drippings or butter put over the top of the 
filling before baking is an improvement. Serve plain 
or with brown gravy. 

Asparagus should be scraped and the tough part 
of the stalt removed; then tied in bunches and 
cooked till tender in boiling salted water. 



TE6ETABLES 65 

Green Com shottld be cooked as soon as possible 
after gathering. Remove the husk and siikj fibre 
and break the ears if too long to go into the kettle 
easily; cook in boiling water just long enough to 
thicken the milk of the grain — from twelve to 
twenty-five minutes will be required, according to 
the age of the com. If it can not be cooked as soon 
as gathered, leave the husk on till the last moment 
as it prevents the com drying and becoming tough. 

Peas should have fresh-looking, wdl-filled, crisp 
pods. They should not be shelled till just before 
cooking and will have a richer flavor if some of the 
pods are cooked in the water. Have the water boil- 
ing and cook the peas about twenty minutes. Fresh 
peas are more tender and seem to be more easily 
digested than dried ones, but the latter, partly owing 
to the evaporation of water in the drying process, 
are, pound for pound, more nutritious and nitroge- 
nous. 

All fresh vegetables should be crisp and firm 
when put on the fire to cook, and if for any reason 
this crispness is lacking, it may be restored by soak- 
ing in very cold water. This soaking may be neces- 
sary for a few minutes only, but in extreme cases it 
will take several hours to attain the desired result. 

In cooking all green vegetables it is better to have 
the saucepan only partly covered, to permit the 
escape of some of the volatile matter liberated by 
heat; it also insures a better color. Green vegetables 
are sometimes prepared for the table by blanching, 
that is, cooking in fast-boiling water from five to 
twenty minutes, having the saucepan uncovered, the 
time required depending on the vegetable. The 
water is then drained off and cooking completed with 
the addition of a little butter or drippings, sea- 
soning and, in the case of very dry vegetables, a 
little stock or water. The saucepan should be cov- 
ered and the cooking done very gently. Vegetables 
are better flavored when cooked by this process than 
when simply boiled in a large quantity of water. 



66 BUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

Few cooks realize the importance of cooking fresh 
vegetables as soon as possible after preparing them. 
Statistics show that in the case of potatoes, peeled 
and left soaking in water for several hours, the loss 
in nitrogenous matter was 50 per cent, and in mineral 
matter 40 per cent; while when placed at once in 
boiling water after peeling, they lost only 8 per cent 
and 19 per cent respectively, during the cooking. 

Steamed vegetables lose only about one-third as 
much food value as when immersed in boiling water, 
but more fuel is used as they cook more slowly. 

The greatest changes that occur when cooking 
vegetables are the swelling and bursting of starch 
grains, softening of cellular tissue and development 
of flavors and odors; while if the cooking is too long 
continued, flavor and odor are partly or entirely lost. 

There are several ways of eliminating, at least, a 
part of the odor of cooking vegetables. One, to 
discard the first cooking-water after five minutes 
and replacing it with fresh; another, to place a small 
piece of charcoal in the pan with the vegetables; or 
with onions or greens cook a slice of red pepper, 
fresh or dried, in the pan. 

Potatoes should always be kept in a cool, dark 
place. In warmth and light they are liable to 
sprout, which is undesirable. They are so com- 
monly used that we might expect them served in 
perfection, but in reality few vegetables are so 
poorly cooked. If potatoes are peeled before cook- 
ing, it should be done as thinly as possible; the 
flavor is better and the food value greater if the skin 
is left on. Always cook potatoes of even size at one 
time that all may be done together. 

Baking is the best method of cooking, as all the 
potash salts are retained and dry heat bursts the 
starch cells, rendering the potatoes mealy and di- 
gestible. When baked or boiled in their skins they 
must be eaten as soon as cooked, otherwise the 
flavor changes quickly. If delay is necessary, break 
the skin to let some of the moisture escape. 



VEGETABLES 67 

To boil potatoes, either in their jackets or when 
peeled, put them into enough boiling water to cover, 
add a tablespoon of salt for each dozen potatoes, 
cover the saucepan closely, and if of moderate size 
cook thirty minutes — small ones may take a little 
less time. Test with a fork and, if tender, drain at 
once, let the steam pass off and shake the potatoes 
in the pan to make them floury. If they can not be 
served at once, cover lightly with cheese cloth to 
prevent the cold air reaching them. 

Creamed or escalloped potatoes are better pre- 
pared from left-over baked ones rather than boiled, 
as they are drier and of better flavor. The same 
applies to German fried, that is, cold cooked po- 
tatoes fried; also to Lyonnaise potatoes, that is, 
potatoes fried with minced onion, or chives and 
chopped parsley. 

Savory Potatoes 

6 moderate-sized potatoes. 1 pint milk. 

2 small onions. Salt and pepper to taste. 

Pare and cut the potatoes in thin slices; put a 
layer of them in a baking-dish, sprinkle with finely- 
minced onion, salt and pepper, repeating in the same 
order till the dish is full or the ingredients all used. 
Pour enough milk over the potatoes to cover them, 
and bake slowly till tender, adding more milk as 
that in the dish boils away. 



Hashed Brown Potatoes 

6 cold cooked potatoes, yi cup salt pork cut in dice 

baked or boiled. and measured after cut- 

Salt and pepper to taste. ting, or y^ cup butter. 

Try out the salt pork, and when the fat is given 
off remove the scraps, or melt the butter and let it 
become quite hot without browning, — do not use 
both pork and butter, — put the potatoes into the fat 
and toss them about till hot; season, then let them 



68 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

remain in the pan without stirring till the under 
side is browned. Invert on a hot dish that the 
browned side may be uppermost. 

Potato Croquette! 

2 cups mashed potato. 2 teaspoons chopped paisley. 

1 tablespoon butter. % teaspoon onion juice. 

Salt, pepper and a little 1 egg. 
celery salt. 

Pass the potato through a potato rioer or sieve to 
insure all lumps being removed. This is best done 
when the potatoes are freshly boiled and hot« Add 
and beat in the butter, seasoning, parsley and onion 
juice, and when these are well mixed stir in the 
well-beaten egg, or as much of it as is required to 
make the potato just firm enough to handle easily. 
Form into croquettes of any desired shape, dip in 
beaten egg and bread crumbs (see instructions for 
Frying, page 30), and cook golden brown in hot fat. 

Lyonnaise Potatoes 

6 cold cooked potatoes, 2 medium-sized onions, 

baked or boiled. 2 tablespoons butter. 

Salt and pepper to taste. 

Peel and cut the potatoes into slices, peel and 
thinly slice the onions. Heat the butter and fry the 
onions in it till they just begin to turn yellow; then 
put in the potatoes and seasoning, and cook golden 
brown, turning the potatoes about constantly in the 
pan that they may cook and color evenly. 

Creole Tomatoes 

4 large tomatoes. Salt and cayenne. 

1 small onion. 4 tablespoons butter. 

2 green peppers, finely 1 tablespoon flour. 

chopped. 1 cup milk and cream. 

Cut the tomatoes in halves crosswise; lay cut side 
up in a baking-pan and sprinkle with the finely* 



TEGXTABLES 69 

elbiopiwd cmcmy alsa tiie* peppers ftom which the 
sasds and veins: have becm nuDoovied. Season highl3r^ 
put a small piece of butter on each piece of tomato, 
using two tablespoonfuls for the purpose. Pour half 
a cup of water into the pan, and bake in a quick 
oven till the tomatoes are tender. Melt the remain- 
ing two tablespoons ol butter and brown the flour 
in it; add milk acnd cream, also the liquor frcmi the 
baking-pan, stir tilfl boiling and cook three minutes 
longer. Dish the tomatoes on squares of toast and 
pour the aauce around them. 

Escafibj^d Canliflower 

1 cauliflower. }4 cup bread crumbs. 

1 tablespoon butter. ^ cup nuts. 

y^ cup cream. S<tlt and pepper. 

1 cup milk. 

Cook the canliflorwer in boiling salted waik and' 
water till tender, H»ing the milk to keep^ the cauli- 
flower white; drain, and break the vegetable into 
small pieces. Heat the butter and cream together 
and add seasoning and nuts. Greaae a baking-dish 
and sprinkle it with crumbs; put in a layer of cauli- 
flower, then a little of the sauce, more cauliflower 
and more sauce, till the dish is filled or the ingre- 
dients used. Sprinkle the remainder of the crumbs 
on top, and place in a hot oven to brown. 

Creamed Celery 

The outside stalks of 3 2 tablespoons flour, 

heads of celery. 1>^ cups milk. 

2 tablespoons butter. Salt and pepper to taste. 

Wash and scrape the celery and cut into inch 
lengths; cook in salted water till tender, which will 
probably require about half an hour, and then drain 
very thoroughly. Blend together the butter and 
flour, add the milk a little at a time, stirring con- 
stantly till the whole boils. Cook three minutes. 



70 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

add salt and pepper, and heat the celery in the 
sauce. Onions, parsnips and carrots may be pre- 
pared in the same manner. 

Hashed Turnip 

1 large yellow turnip. % teaspoon pepper. 

2 tablespoons butter. 1 tablespoon cnopped 
1 level teaspoon salt. parsley. 

X cup thin cream. 

Peel the turnip thickly and cut into dice. Cook 
till tender in boiling water, then drain and return to 
the saucepan; add the butter, seasoning, parsley and 
cream. Let the whole boil up once, and serve. 



Com Oysters 

"% pint grated ereen corn. 1 egg. 

2 tablespoons flour. % cup milk. 

% teaspoon salt. Butter. 

Scrape or grate the corn from the cob. Sift the 
flour and salt and mix to a batter with the egg and 
milk; stir the corn into the batter and drop by 
spoonfuls into a frying-pan containing a little hot 
butter. When one side is brown turn and cook the 
other. 



MEMORANDA 



flSHORASTM 



SALADS 

8ALAD6 AID SALAD DRESSIIIGS 

ALMOST every variety of vegetables and fruits may 
i be made into ealadB. Eggs are used also, as well 
as many kinds of fish and meat. Vegetable salads 
are the most common and should therefore receive 
first consideration. 

Naturally, lettuce heads the list. It is more pop- 
ular because we can get it when other vegetables 
are almost unobtainable. The round, close heads are 
more generally used than the long-leaf variety. 
Curly lettuce, while pretty, is tougher than either of 
the other two. Lettuce contains little nutriment, 
but IS rich in mineral salts. 

Sorrel is one of the wild salad plants and deserves 
to be better known and appreciated. It has a 
slightly acid taste, and for this reason be sparing of 
the vinegar when dressing it. Sorrel may be used 
as a salad by itself, or blended with other salad 
plants such as lettuce or spinach. 

Mustard and cress used together make a good salad. 

Small yellow tomatoes dipped for a moment in 
boiling water, then peeled with a sharp knife, thor- 
oughly chilled, seasoned, sprinkled with chopped 
parsley, piled on lettuce leaves and served with a 
French dressing make a salad that tastes as good 
as it looks. 

In winter, when fresh salad plants are hard to 
obtain, a tomato jelly or salad made from canned or 
fresh (cooked) string beans, or even from the re- 
mains of baked beans seasoned with parsley and 
onion juice, is economical and satisfying. 

THE CLEAffSING OF SALAD PLAITTS 

Lettuce. Growing so near the ground much dirt 
gets into lettuce. In preparing it for the table, 
separate all the leaves and wash well; the leaves 

73 



74 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

may be left in water about half an hour to absorb 
moisture and become crisp, but should then be 
drained in one of the globe-shaped baskets made 
for the purpose, or dried in a soft cloth. If to be 
kept for any length of time, wrap the lettuce in 
damp cheese cloth and place near, but not on, the ice. 

Water Cress. This plant requires very careful at- 
tention when being prepared for the table, as many 
non-edible leaves are gathered with it, also because 
small water insects cling closely to it. A little salt 
in the water in which the cress is washed will greatly 
aid their removal. 

Endive, Field Salad and Dandelion. These leaves 
must be carefully picked over, foreign matter re- 
moved, and after freshening in water for a short 
time, well drained before using. 

Celery and Chicory. The stalks of these must be 
broken apart, washed and brushed with a vegetable 
brush, and all discolored parts cut out. The stalks 
may remain in water or be wrapped in a damp 
cloth till used. Only the inner stalks of celery are 
good for salads; the outer stalks can be boiled and 
served, with sauce, as a vegetable. 

Radishes. These should be washed, scraped and 
cut in thin slices before being served as a salad. 

All Green Salads should be chilled before serving 
that they may be crisp. When the leaves are too 
large to be served whole they should be broken (not 
cut) just before sending them to the table. Add 
dressing to green salads just before eating; if put on 
sooner it softens the leaves and spoils both taste 
and appearance. To make a lettuce salad more sa- 
vory scatter over it before serving a tablespoon of 
finely-chopped chives or, in their season, the same 
quantity of chopped green peppers, removing the 
seeds and white dividing fibre. Peppers and chives 
may be used together if desired. The salad bowl 
may be rubbed with a cut onion, or a few drops of 
onion juice (obtained by pressing a cut onion on a 
grater) can be added to the salad. 



SALADS 75 

In preparing salads from meat and fish an almost 
endless variety of flavors can be obtained by careful 
blending of seasonings to suit the principal ingredi- 
ent of the salad itself. Few better salads can be 
eaten than those made from fragments of cold roast 
lamb cut into dice, mixed with a cup of cooked pea? 
and a little finely-chopped mint. If the lamb be 
boiled, substitute a few chopped capers for the mint; 
with cold pork, have a sprinkling of sage and an 
equal quantity of diced celery; with fish, plenty of 
lemon juice and cucumber. These salads are all 
served with a dressing, either French, boiled or 
mayonnaise as best suits the salad and the con- 
venience of the maker. 

Fruit Salads are frequently served at limcheon — 
sometimes as a first course — and may be made of 
one fruit or a combination of several; those most 
commonly blended being grapes (skinned and seeded), 
oranges, grape-fruit, bananas and apples. Serve with 
French or mayonnaise dressing. 

The chief rules to be remembered in making salads 
are: 

1. All salads likely to be dry, as well as those 
having no dominating flavor, are better if they are 
marinated with a French dressing some time before 
serving, in addition to the dressing added at table. 

2. It is not enough to wash the salad plants; they 
must be dried also, for the water dripping from the 
leaves in the serving dish would thin the dressing 
and make it insipid. 

3. A good portion of the dressing must be mixed 
with the salad, not all poured over the top. 

Harlequin Salad 

1 cup each red and white 1 diced onion. 

cabbage (shaved). y^ cup diced carrot. 

1 cup French peas. Salt and pepper to season 
% cup beet. highly. 

Have the peas, beet and carrot cooked till tender. 
Shave the cabbage and cut the onion into very small 



76 RUMFORD COMFLETE COOK BOOK 

dice; mix all the vegetables, or, if prrferred, arrange 
them in layers or heaps separately. The effect is 
better if they are mixed and they are also easier to 
season and to arrange. Pour a French dressing over 
the salad an hour before serving, and pass either a 
mayonnaise or boiled dressing, or a further supply 
of French dressing, with it at table. 

Cheese Salad 

yi eup mayonnAise dressing. Celery salt and pepper to 
% pound cheese grated or taste. 

run through a meat 1 dozen capers. 

chopper. Lettuce. 

Mix the mayonnaise with the cheese and add the 
seasoning. Form into small balls with butter pad- 
dles or with two spoons. Serve on lettuce leaves on 
individual plates, and garnish with the capers. Pass 
more mayonnaise in a separate dish. 

Neufchatel Salad 

2 rolls Neufchatel cheese. 1 teaspoon each finely- 

2 tableBpoons butter. chopped parsley, chives 

and olives. 
Salt and paprika to taste. 

Beat the butter and cheese till creamy and well 
blended; add the parsley, chives, olives and season- 
ing. Form into small balls and serve on a bed of 
lettuce or cress with French or mayonnaise dressing. 

Potato and Egg Salad 

3 eggs. Salt and pepper to taste. 
3 medium-sized potatoes. French dressmg. 

Hard cook the eggs, remove shells, and chop finely- 
using a silver knife to prevent the eg^s being dis- 
colored. Cook the potatoes, cut into dice while hot 
and mix with the eggs. Then add the dressing and 
season with salt and pepper. Serve very cold on a 
bed of water cress. 



SALADS 77 

Tomato aatd Idma, B»ui Salad 

4 tomatoes. 1 very small onion, grated. 

1^ eups cooked Lima K >®up nuts, finely chopped, 

beans. 2 tabueapoons xoinced celory 

1 tablespoon parsley. or a little celery salt. 

Salt and pepper to taste. 

Cut a slice fram the top of each tomato and with 
a teaapoon xemove ihe pulp. To the beans (if very 
large, cut in halves) add the onion, parsley, nuts, 
celery and seasoning. Mix a little French dressing 
with these ingredients and fill the tomatoes with the 
mixtiffe. Pour more dressing over the top ox »^ve 
it separately. Any dressing desired may be served. 

The tomatoes may be peeled and cut in thick 
slices, and ih& iOther ingredients piled on them if 
preferred. 

Fruit and Hut ScOad 

[ 1 lacge pineapple. 1 dozen maraschino cherries. 

X pound shfiUed almonda. Lettuce. 
X poimd ghelled filberts. !Cream or mayonnaise dressr- 

Remove the rind and the ^eyes from the pine- 
apple and cut the flesh into small pieces, rejecting 
the hard oore« Blanch the nuts by pouring boiling 
water over them and allowing them to stand a few 
minutes, when the skins can be easily removed. 
.Chop finely and add to the pineapple. Pile in little 
heaps on lettuce leaves, cover with the dressing and 
decorate with cherries. 



Stuffed Tomato Salad 

6 idpe tomatoes. Lettuce. 

}4 pint cream. dressing. Bait and pepper. 

'2 cucumbers. Parsley. 

Scald the tomatoes and remove the skins. Cut a 
•filice from the top of each, and with a small spoon 
remove the seeds. Peel the cucumbers and cut them 
into dice, season highly and mix with at least hali 



78 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

the dressing. Fill the tomato cups with this and 
put a spoonful of the dressing on top. Sprinkle a 
very little finely-chopped parsley over, and serve 
on a bed of lettuce leaves. 



Mayonnaise Dressing 

1 eg^ yolk. 4 tablespoons lemon juice or 

}4 pint olive oil. vinegar. 

}4 teaspoon salt. 
X teaspoon paprica or white pepper. 

Break the yolk of the egg into a dry, cold bowl 
and beat a little. At first add the oil to the egg 
very slowly (a few drops at a time), and as the 
dressing begins to thicken, the oil may be added 
more rapidly till, at the last, a teaspoonful at a time 
may be stirred in. The dressing must be stirred 
while the oil is being added, either with a spoon, 
fork or wire egg boater. Add the vinegar slowly, 
continuing the beating while it is being mixed. It 
is better not to add the salt and pepper till the 
mayonnaise is to be used, because it keeps better if 
the seasoning is omitted. In any case, even when the 
dressing is to be used at once, do not add the season* 
ing till the oil and vinegar, or lemon, are added to 
the egg. 

Tarragon or other flavored vinegars, such as mint 
or sage, may be substituted in whole or in part for 
the plain vinegar or lemon juice. 

Keep mayonnaise in a cool, dark place. 



French Dressing 

4 tablespoons olive oil. yi teaspoon paprica or 

l}i tablespoons vinegar. pepper. 

}^ teaspoon salt. 1 teaspoon mixed mustard, 

if liked. 

Mix the salt and pepper in a shallow dish or saucer; 
add the mustard, if it is to be used, and pour in the 
oil. Stir well to mix with the seasonings and add 



SALADS 79 

the vinegar, a little at a time, beating the mixture 
with a fork continuously. Serve as soon as mixed. 



Horseradish Dressing 

1 cup heavy cream. 2 tablespoons lemon juice. 

1 tablespoon grated or Salt and paprica. 

evaporated horse- 
radish. 

Beat the cream till quite thick and then add the 
horseradish finely grated. If evaporated horseradish 
is used, pour over it a tablespoon of cold water and 
allow it to be absorbed before adding to the whipped 
cream. Put in the lemon juice slowly, stirring all 
the time; season to taste, and serve very cold. This 
dressing is especially good with tomatoes. 



Boiled Salad Dressing 

2 tablespoons butter. 2 teaspoons sugar. 

2 eggs. 1 teaspoon dry mustard. 

1 cup vinegar. % teaspoon salt. 

y^ teaspoon pepper. 

Put the butter, sugar, eggs, mustard, salt and 
pepper into a bowl or the inner part of a double 
boiler and cook over hot water till they begin to 
thicken. Add the vinegar and continue the cook- 
ing three minutes. Beat the mixture occasionally 
wMle cooling. Keep in a cool, dark place. This 
dressing will remain good several weeks. 



Cream Dressing 

% teaspoon salt. 1 teaspoon mustard. 

1 teaspoon flour. 1 tablespoon sugar. 

2 egg yolks. 2 tablespoons butter. 
% cup cream. X <5up vinegar. 

Mix the dry ingredients with the butter; add the 
yolks of the eggs, then the cream and, lastly, the 
vinegar, and cook over hot water until it thickens. 
Strain if necessary, and chill. 



80 BUMFOBD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

Chicken Sakd 

1 eold cooked fowl. Mayomudae dressing. 

2 cups celery. Lettuce. 

4 tablespoons oil. Hard-boiled eg^ and olives 

2 tablespoons vinegar. for decorating. 

Salt and pepper to taste. 

After removing all skin and gristle, cut the fowl 
into dice and mix it with the celery; add the salt 
and pepper, and marinate for an hour before using 
with the oil and vinegar. Mix with mayonnaise 
dressing and garnish with lettuce, hard-boiled egg 
and stoned olives, or strips of red pepper. 



Cocoanut Salad 

yi cocoanut, grated. 2 tablespoons onions, 

2 apples, pared, cored chopped. 

and cnopped. 1 tablespoon parsley, 

1 cup celery, chopped. coarsely cnopped. 

3 Chili peppers. 

Mix, cover with two measures French dressing, 
chill and serve in lettuce shells or in scooped-out 
tomatoes. 



MEMORAITDA 



MEMORANDA 



EGGS 

HARD AND SOFT COOKED EGGS 

TO cook eggs so that they will be firm all the way 
through and yet not tough or indigestible, put 
them in a saucepan of boiling water, cover closely 
and place on a part of the stove where the water 
will remain very hot, but not boil, and let stand 
for twenty minutes. 

To cook eggs so that they will be soft, follow the 
above directions, but let the eggs remain only ten 
minutes. 

Shirred Eggs 

2 eggs. 1 tablespoon butter. 

Salt and pepper to taste. 

Melt the butter in an egg shirrer or any fireproof 
earthen baking-dish; brealT the eggs into the dish 
and season to taste. Cook in a moderate oven until 
set and serve in the baking-dish. Shirred eggs cook 
very nicely if placed on an asbestos mat on top of 
the range and covered with another mat kept for 
such purposes. This saves heating the oven if there 
is no other baking to be done. A little chopped 
parsley, cheese or a few fried bread crumbs may be 
sprinkled over the eggs before cooking, if desired. 



Poached or Dropped Eggs 

2 eggs. Boiling salted water. 

Buttered toast. 

Have the water boiling in a shallow pan — a 
frying-pan is good, — salt it lightly and drop in the 
eggs, one at a time, having previously broken them 
into a cup to see that they are fresh. Cook till the 
whites are just set, then lift from the water with a 
skimmer and place on the hot buttered toast. 

83 



\ 



84 RUMFOBD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

An excellent method of insuring the good shape of 
the eggs is to grease a muflSn ring for each e^g to be 
cooked and place in the pan. Drop the egg into the 
ring which can be easily removed when the cooking 
is completed. 

Scrambled Bggs 

6 eggs. 6 tablespoons cream or milk. 

2 tablespoons butter. % teaspoon salt. 

yi teaspoon pepper. 

Beat the eggs lightly, whites and yolks together, 
add the seasoning and cream or milk, and place 
with the butter in a saucepan. Stir the mixture con- 
stantly with a wooden spoon till it begins to thicken, 
then remove the saucepan to a cooler part of the 
stove and continue the cooking till the eggs are set. 
Serve either on buttered toast or garnished with 
points of toast. 

A little grated cheese, a few green peas or mush- 
rooms (cooked), or a few asparagus tips are some- 
times added to the scrambled eggs just before 
removing them from the fire. 



Pkun Omelet 

4 eggs. X teaspoon salt. 

4 tablespoons water. yi teaspoon pepper. 

2 tablespoons butter. 

Break the eggs into a bowl and beat them lightly, 
yolks and whites together, add the salt, pepper and 
water, and mix all well; melt the butter in a clean 
omelet pan and allow it to become quite hot without 
browning. Pour the eggs into the pan, mix and 
stir them gently till they begin to set. Now push 
the omelet down to one side of the pan that it may 
be thick and puffy, tilting the pan so as to keep it 
at one side. Cook till just set in the centre and 
golden brown on the surface next to the pan. Turn 
onto a dish, brown side up, and serve plain or with 
tomato or other sauce. 



EGGS 85 

Oraxige Omelet 

4 eggs. 2 tablespoons butter. 

4 tableBpooDS water. 2 oranges. 

% teaspoon salt. Su^ar to taste. 

Prepare the oranges by removing the skins, every 
particle of white pith, the seeds and as much as 
possible of the inner dividing skin; then cut or 
break into small pieces and add sugar to sweeten. 
This should be done some time before making the 
omelet so that the orange juice and sugar may form 
a syrup. 

Separate the whites from the yolks of the eggs; 
beat first the whites, then the yolks (by beating the 
whites first the same beater will do for both); add 
the salt and water to the yolks, then blend with the 
stifBy-beaten whites. Heat the butter in an omelet 
pan and when hot, but not browned, pour in the 
^gs and cook over a moderate, steady heat till the 
bottom of the omelet is set. This can be ascertained 
by gently inserting a knife between the omelet and the 
pan. As soon as set, place the pan on the upper shelf 
of a fairly hot oven to cook the top. When firm to the 
touch and slightly browned, remove from the oven 
and put a few pieces of the orange on the omelet; 
mark across the centre with a knife, double the two 
sides together quickly and turn or roll onto a hot 
dish. Four the remainder of the orange around it 
and serve at once, as it soon falls. 

Cheese Omelet 

3 eg03. yi teaspoon pepper. 

3 tablespoons water. 2 tablespoons butter. 

2 tablespoons mild grated Salt, if needed, 
cheese. 

Beat the eggs lightly, yolks and whites together, 
add the water and seasoning. Melt the butter in an 
omelet pan, pour in the eggs and stir and mix lightly 
till they begin to set. Sprinkle the grated cheese 
over the top, then scrape and push the omelet to 



86 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

one side of the pan. Cook about one minute, then 
either turn in the pan bv slipping a knife under the 
omelet, or hold the pan for a moment in front of the 
fire or under the flame of the gas range. Turn onto 
a hot (Ush, and serve at once. 

Omelet Souffle 

6 eggs. yi teaspoon any desired 

yi cup of sugar. flavoring. 

A pinch of salt. 

Separate the whites and yolks of the eggs and beat 
the whites to a stiff froth; add the sugar and salt to 
the yolks and beat till thick. Mix the whites and 
yolks lightly together and add the flavoring; turn 
into a buttered souflS^ or pudding-dish, and bake in 
a hot oven from twelve to fourteen minutes. 

Serve, as soon as set, in the dish in which it was 
cooked. Do not keep the souffle waiting before 
serving, as it very quickly falls. 



Omelet Celestine 

Prepare the omelet exactly as for Orange 
Omelet, omitting the oranges, and in their place 
spread the omelet, after it is dished, with peach 
preserve or marmalade, then with finely-chopped, 
blanched almonds, and cover with whipped cream. 

Cheese SoufBi6 

3 tablespoons flour. 1 cup milk. 

3 tablespoons butter. 1 cup grated cheese. 

3 eggs. . Salt and pepper to taste. 

Put the butter and flour together in a saucepan 
and stir till blended without browning. Add the 
milk, a little at a time, and stir till the mixture 
boils; then add the grated cheese, salt and pepper, 
and set aside to cool. Beat the eggs, yolks and 
whites separately; then add the yolks to the mixture 
in the saucepan and blend thoroughly. Lastly, fold 



EGGS 87 

in the whites beaten to a stiff froth, and turn the 
80ufi96 into a deep, well-greased dish. Bake in a 
moderate oven about twenty-five minutes, and serve 
at once as it soon falls. 

Chicken SotifEll 

1}^ tablespoons butter. }4 teaspoon salt. 

1}^ tablespoons flour. j4 teaspoon pepper. 

IX cups milk, or milk and 1 cup mincea chicken, 
chicken stock. 3 eggs. 

J4 teaspoon grated lemon K cup stale bread crumbs, 
rind. 

Blend the butter and flour in a saucepan without 
browning; add the milk and stir till boiling; then 
put in the salt, pepper, bread crumbs and lemon 
rind. Cool, and then stir in the chicken; beat and 
add the eggs — the yolks beaten till thick and the 
whites till stifif. Bake in a well-greased pan, in a 
moderately hot oven, about half an hour. 

Lemon Soufli^ 

X cnp butter. 3 eggs. 

ji cup flour. IM cups milk. 

>? cup sugar. Grated rind of 1 lemon. 

}i teaspoon salt. 

Put the butter and flour together in a saucepan 
and blend smoothly; add the milk, a little at a time, 
stirring constantly till boiling; cool, and add the 
lemon rind, sugar and salt, then the yolks of the 
eggs beaten till thick and, lastly, the whites beaten 
to a stiff froth. Turn into a greased pudding-mould 
and steam one hour. Serve with a hot sweet sauce. 

Swiss Eggs 

1 tablespoon butter. 4 eggs. 

2 tablespoons grated cheese. 3 tablespoons cream. 

4 very thin slices of cheese. Salt and pepper to taste. 

Melt the butter in a shallow baking-dish; cut the 
slices of cheese in pieces of convenient size to cover 
the bottom of the dish. Break the eggs and drop 



8S BUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

them into the dish over the cheese, season to tastei, 
and pour the cream over the eggs; sprinkle the grated 
cheese on top and bake in a moderate oven till the 
eggs are set and the cheese a delicate brown. 

^ggB in PriMni 

2 cups of cold, cooked Stale browned bread crumbs. 

meat. Seasoning and flavoring to 

4 eggs. f uii the meat. 

Grease thoroughly four small cups or moulds and 
sprinkle thickly with the browned crumbs. Season 
and flavor the meat rather highlv, and line the 
moulds with it, leaving a hollow in tne centre of each 
mould — the meat may be moistened with stock or 
gravy if too dry, — break a raw egg into the hollow 
left for the purpose in each cup, sprinkle with salt 
and pepper, and bake in a moderate oven till the 
eggs are set. Turn out and serve with or without 
sauce or gravy. 

Japanese Eggs 

1^ cups boiled rice. 1 teaspoon onion juice. 

6 hard-cooked eggs. 1 teaspoon parsley. 

IK cups white sauce. ^1 teaspoon soy or Worcester- 
^ snire sauce. 

Pile the hot, cooked rice on a platter; cut the 
eggs in quarters and imbed in the rice; pour over 
them the sauce flavored with the onion juice and 
the soy or Worcestershire sauce, and sprinkle the 
chopped parsley over the top. 

Note. — Soy is a sauce to be found in some stores 
where Japanese and Chinese products are sold. Its 
principal ingredient is the soy bean. 

Egg Timbalet 

4 eggs. Salt and pepper. 

2 tablespoons cbjopped 4 tablespoons milk or thin 

parsley or chopped cream. 

nam. Tomato or white sauce. 

Beat the eggs just enough to thoroughly mix yolks 
and whites, add the salt, pepper and the milk or 
cream. 



EGQS 89 

Grease very small cups or moulds and sprinkle the 
bottoms and sides with the parsley or ham, pour in 
enough egg to nearly fill each cup and stand in a 
pan of almost boiling water. Cook either in a 
moderate oven or over a slow fire, that the water 
may not boil rapidly and cause the timbales to 
become "honeycombed." As soon as a knife can be 
inserted in the timbales and drawn out clean, they 
are done. Unmould on individual plates, because 
their delicacy makes them diflScult to serve from a 
platter, and pour the sauce around them. 

Savory Eggs 

6 eggs. 1 tablespoon vinegar. 

2 medium-sized onions. Salt and paprika to taste. 

3 tablespoons butter. 14 ^^V ^^^^ bread crumbs* 

1 tablespoon grated cheese. 

Heat one and one-half tablespoons of the butter 
in a frying-pan, and cook in it the onions, which have 
been peeled and finely minced, till light l3rown; then 
turn the onions into a baking-dish that can be sent 
to the table; spread them over the bottom of the 
dish and break the eggs over them; add the vinegar 
and seasoning, and sprinkle with the bread crumbs 
that have been fried in the remaining tablespoon 
and a half of butter. Put the cheese over the top 
and bake in a moderate oven till the eggs are just 
set. 

Curried Eggs 

6 hard-cooked eggs. % sour apple or a teaspoon 

1 very small onion. of lemon juice. 

2 tablespoons butter or }4 teaspoon salt. 

drippings. 1}4 cups water, stock or 

1 tablespoon flour. milk. 

1 tablespoon curry powder. 

Hard cook the eggs, remove the shells and cut the 
eggs in slices. Melt the butter or drippings and cook 
in it the onion, peeled and finely minced; next, put 
in the flour and curry powder and cook three min- 
utes. Add the stock, water or milk slowly, and 



90 RUMPORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

stir till the sauce boils; put in the apple or lemon 
juice and simmer gently for twenty minutes. Add 
salt; and heat the slices of egg in the hot sauce. 



Scotch Eggs 

6 hard-cooked eges. Salt and pepper to taste. 

yi cup stale bread crumbs. % cup milk. 

1 cup minced ham or other Egg and bread crumbs, 

meat. Frying fat. 

Cook the eggs twenty minutes in water just below 
the boiling point; stand in cold water for half an 
hour; then remove the shells and wipe the eggs 
quite dry. 

Cook the half cup of bread crumbs in the milk 
till thick; add the seasoning and meat and mix all 
together to form a rather stiff paste. Take a portion 
of this and press around one of the eggs smoothly 
with the hand, having the paste of equal thickness 
all over; and continue till the eggs are covered. 
Take a raw egg with one tablespoon of water and 
beat lightly; dip each of the prepared eggs into this 
and cover every particle with the raw egg. As soon 
as covered; drop onto a paper containing stale bread 
crumbS; coat with these and fry in deep fat till 
golden brown. Cut in halveS; stand cut side up, and 
serve plain or with white or tomato sauce or gravy. 



MEMORANDA 



XEMORARDA 



PUDDINGS AND PUDDING SAUCES 

Quince Pudding 

2 cups flour. 2 tablespoons melted butter* 

2 teaspoons Rumford 1 egg. 

Baking Powder. 1>J cups milk. 

yi teaspoon salt. 1 cup quince preserve. 

Sift together the flour, salt and baking powder; 
beat the egg, add to it the milk and melted butter, 
and mix these with the dry ingredients to form a 
stiff batter. When well mixed, add the preserve and 
beat well. Turn into a greased baking-pan and bake 
in a moderate oven about half an hour. Cut in 
squares, and serve with sweetened whipped cream. 

Apricot SoufQL6 

1 cup canned apricots. 3 egg whites. 

J^ cup sugar. 6 drops almond extract. 

Rub apricots through a sieve; place in saucepan 
and bring to the boiling point; add the sugar, ex- 
tract and whites of the eggs beaten to a stiff froth, 
and mix well with the fruit. Turn into small moulds 
that have been greased and sprinkled with sugar. 
Stand in a pan containing enough hot water to come 
halfway up the sides of the moulds, and bake until 
firm — about twenty minutes. 

Italian Nut Pudding 

1 pint milk. 1 tablespoon sherry. 

% cup sugar. 2 egg yolks. 

1 cup macaroni. ^ cup nut meats. 

yi teaspoon cinnamon. Whipped cream. 

Scald the milk and add to it the macaroni which 
has been passed through a meat grinder. Cook till 
the macaroni is tender and the whole of the con- 
sistency of a thick custard. Add the sugar and 
cinnamon, then the sherry, and yolks of the eggs 
beaten till they are thick. Sprinkle half the nut 
meatS; coarsely chopped, over the bottom of small 



94 BUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

moulds, fill with the pudding, and put the remainder 
of the nuts over the top. Stand the moulds in a pan 
of hot water and bake fifteen minutes. Turn out 
and serve with whipped cream. 

Marmalade Pudding 

1 cup stale bread crumbs. 2 eggs. 

% cup orange marmalade. 1% cups milk. 

1 teaspoon butter. 

Use the butter to grease a pudding-mould or bowl, 
then put in the bread crumbs and marmalade in thin 
layers, till all are used. Beat the eggs lightly, yolka 
and whites together, and add the milk to form a 
custard; pour over the ingredients in the bowl and 
let stand ten minutes. If the pudding-mould has a 
cover put it on, otherwise cover with a piece of 
greased paper twisted under the rim of the bowl to 
keep it in position. Place in a saucepan containing 
enough boiling water to come two-thirds up the 
sides of the bowl. Cook one hour, adding more 
water as that in the pan boils away. Serve hot with 
a lemon sauce. 

Poor Man's Rice Padding 

1 quart milk. 1 tablespoon butter. 

2 tablespoons rice. A pinch of salt. 

3 tablespoons sugar. 

Wash the rice well and put it in a baking-dish 
with the salt, sugar and butter; pour the milk over 
and bake very slowly, at least two and one-half 
hours, stirring twice during the first hour. 

King George's Podding 

y^ cup flour. % cup finely-chopped suet. 

1 level cup of any flaked 1 egg. 

cereal. >i cup milk. 

yi cup sugar. yi teaspoon salt. 

yi cup dark-colored jam — 1 teaspoon Rumford Baking 

plum, raspberry or Powder' 

Blackberry. 

Put together in a bowl the flour, cereal, sugar, 
suet, salt and baking powder; beat the egg thor- 



PUDDINGS AND PUDDING SAUCES 95 

oughly and add to it the milk and jam; mix, and use 
to moisten the other ingredients. Turn into a well- 
greased mould or bowl, cover and steam three hours. 
Serve hot with a sweet sauce. 

Fig Puffs 

IH cups flour. 2 tablespoons butter. 

^ teaspoon salt. 1 egg. 

2 teaspoons Rumford Bak- 1^ cups milk. 

ing Powder. |< cup chopped figs. 

Sift the flour, salt and baking powder, rub in the 
butter, then add the figs, mixing them well into the 
dry flour. Mix to a stifif batter with the beaten egg 
and milk. Bake in small greased pans in a moder- 
ately hot oven. Serve hot with a sauce. 

Canary Pudding 

3 eggs. Grated rind of 1 lemon. 

y^ cup butter. 1 teaspoon Rumford Baking 

^ cup sugar. Powder. 

ji cup flour. 

Melt the butter, add the sugar, then the flour and 
baking powder sifted together; next, the lemon rind, 
and lastly, the eggs well beaten. Put into greased 
cups and steam three-quarters of an hour. Serve 
hot, with or without a sauce. 

English Plum Pudding 

}^ pound suet. J^ teaspoon each ground 
}4 pound currants. cloves, nutmeg and 

y^ pound seeded raisins. ging|er. 

}4 pound sugar. Grated rmd of 2 lemons. 

y^ pound stale bread }4 pound citron or orange 

crumbs. peel. 

}4 pound flour. 6 eggs. 
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon. }4 cup brandy. 

Chop the suet finely, clean the currants, seed the 
raisins, and cut the peel quite small. Put all to- 
gether into a bowl, add the lemon rind, sugar, spices, 
flour and bread crumbs, and moisten with the well- 



96 SUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

beaten eggs and brandy. Turn into well-greased 
bowls or pudding-moulds and steam or boil eight 
hours. These puddings will keep a year, but need 
to be boiled for an hour before serving. 

Plain Pfaim Pudding 

}4 cup finely-ehopped beef 2 teaspoons Rumford Bak- 

suet. ing Powder. 

yi cup suffar. 1 teaspoon mixed spices. 

1 cup seeaed raisins. }i teaspoon salt. 
K cup currants. H cup milk. 

2 cups flour. 1 egg. 

Clean the currants and add them to the seeded 
raisins and suet. Sift the flour with the spices, 
baking powder and salt and add to the fruit with 
the sugar; moisten with the egg and milk and turn 
into a greased pudding-mould. Steam three hours, 
and serve with hard or lemon sauce. 

Date Pudding 

yi pound stoned dates. 1 teaspoon salt. 

^ pound beef suet. 1 teaspoon Rumford Baking 

1 cup flour. Powder. 

}i cup sugar. 1 cup bread crumbs. 

1 teaspoon ground ^ger. 2 eggs. 

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon. % cup milk. 

Chop the dates and suet finely or pass them 
through a meat chopper; add all the dry ingredients 
and moisten with the eggs, well beaten, and the 
milk. Turn into greased moulds, cover and steam — 
if in one large mould, three hours; if in smaller ones, 
two hours. Serve hot with hard sauce. 



Steamed Orange Pudding 

IK cups scalded milk. l4 cup sugar. 

1 cup bread crumbs. The ^ated rind and strained 

2 tablespoons butter. juice of 2 small oranges. 

3 eggs. 

Pour the scalded milk over the crumbs, add the 
butter and let the mixture stand for ten minutes; 



PUDDINGS AND PUDDING SAUCES 97 

beat the eggs thoroughly and add them with the 
sugar; stir in the orange juice and rind, and beat 
well. Turn into greased moulds, cover, and steam 
one hour. 

Baked Orange Pudding 

yi cup sugar. The ^ated rind and strained 

2 tablespoons bread juice of 1 orange, 

crumbs. 1 cup milk, 

legg. 

Beat the egg thoroughly and add the orange and 
sugar; scald the milk and pour it over the crumbs; 
add the first mixture and, when well mixed, pour 
into a baking-dish. Bake till set like a custard, and 
serve cold. 

Mother Eve's Pudding 

4 eggs. H cup sugar. 

4 apples. Pinch of salt. 

\}i cups bread crumbs. Slight grating of nutmeg. 

Peel, core and chop the apples finely; add the 
bread crumbs, sugar, salt and nutmeg. Beat the 
eggs well and use them to moisten the pudding. 
Turn into a greased mould, cover closely and steam 
two hours. Serve with a hot sweet sauce. 



Apple Puffs 

1 cup flour. 1 teaspoon Rumford Baking 
y^ CUP sugar. Powder. 

3 apples. 1 cup milk. 

1 egg. Pincn of salt. 

Sift together the flour, salt and baking powder; 
add the sugar and the apples peeled, cored and 
chopped; mix to a rather stifif batter with the egg 
and milk. Drop by spoonfuls into hot fat and cook 
till the puffs are golden brown and the apples tender. 
Drain on soft paper, and serve hot with a sauce. 



98 BTTMFOSD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

Cherry Pttdding 

1 pound stoned cherries. 1 cup milk. 

yi cup sugar. 4 tablespoons flour. 

3 eggs. A pinch of salt. 

Grease a pudding-mould or bowl and put in it the 
cherries that have been stoned, and mixed with the 
sugar. Make a batter by beating the eggs and add- 
ing them to the flour which has been sifted with the 
salt; mix in the milk and beat to remove all lumps. 
Pour this batter over the cherries; cover the mould, 
and steam the pudding one and one-half hours. 

Lemon Snowballs 

3 eggs. 2 tablespoons lemon juice. 

1 cup granulated sugar. 1 cup flour. 

3 tablespoons water. 1 teaspoon Rumford Baking 

The grated rind of 1 lemon. Powder. 

Beat the yolk of the eggs and sugar together till very 
light, add the water, lemon juice and rind; then the 
flour and baking powder sifted together. Beat the 
whites of the eggs till stiff, add them to the batter and 
fold in as gently as possible. Grease small cups, put a 
heaping tablespoon of the batter in each, and steam 
or boil for half an hour. Turn out, roll in powdered 
sugar, and serve with a lemon sauce. 

Brown Betty 

2 cups fine bread crumbs. 3 cups stewed sweetened 

apples. 
3 tablespoons butter. 

Melt the butter and add the crumbs, stirring till 
they have absorbed it all. Grease a pudding-dish, 
put a layer of the buttered crumbs in the bottom, 
then a layer of apples, then more crumbs and so on, 
till the dish is full or the ingredients all used. Have 
crumbs for the top layer and sprinkle a few bits of 
butter over them. Bake in a moderate oven three- 
quarters of an hour. 



PUDDINGS AND PUDDING SAUCES 99 

Cottage Pudding 

2 cups flour. ^ cup sugar. 

2 teaspoons Rumford Bak- 1 egg. 

ing Powder. 2 tablespoons melted butter. 

% teaspoon salt. 1 cup milk. 

Sift together the flour, salt and baking powder; 
add the sugar and mix to a stiff batter with the egg, 
butter and milk. Bake in a shallow, greased dish 
about half an hour. Serve hot with sauce. 



Rice Cream 

1 quart milk. 1 rounding tablespoon granu- 

}4 cup rice. lated gelatine. 

3 tablespoons sugar. % pint whipped cream. 

Scald the milk in a double boiler, add the rice and 
cook till tender. Turn out, add the sugar and, when 
nearly cold, add the gelatine which has been dis- 
solved by standing in half a cup of milk for ten min- 
utes; then heat both milk and gelatine till the latter 
is melted. As soon as the mixture shows signs of 
setting, add the whipped cream, stir it in lightly, 
and turn into a wet mould. Chill thoroughly, turn 
out, and serve with fresh or cooked fruit. 



Bavarian Cream 

1 pint milk or half milk }i cup cold water. 

and half thin cream. % cup sugar. 
3 eggs. ]4 pint whipped cream. 

1 tablespoon granmated gelatine. 

Soak the gelatine in the cold water. Cook the 
yolks of the eggs and milk (or milk and cream) in a 
double boiler, stirring constantly till they coat the 
back of the spoon; add the sugar and soaked gelatine. 
Let the mixture become almost cold, then add the 
whipped cream and the stiffly-beaten whites of the 
eggs, which blend thoroughly with the other ingre- 
dients, and turn into a wet mould. When chilled, 
serve with custard, cream or fruit. 



100 RUMFOBD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

Peach Cream 

1 quart peaches. 1 cup whipped cream. 

1 cup water. 1 tablespoon granulated 

5^ cup sugar. gelatine. 

% cup cold water. 

Cook the peaches till tender with the water and 
sugar, then pass them through a sieve. Soak the 
gelatine for ten minutes in the quarter cup of cold 
water, then heat it to the boiling point and add to 
the peaches. Whip the cream stiffly and add to the 
fruit pulp when the latter is nearly cold; mix smoothly 
and turn into a china or granite mould. Have the 
cream very cold when turned out. The mould may 
be decorated with sections of fresh peaches if desired. 
Canned peaches can be used for making this dessert. 



Coffee Cream 

\}4 cups milk. 1 tablespoon granulated 

3 eggs. gelatine. 

}4 cup sugar. ^ cup strong coffee. 

1 cup whipped, cream. 

Make a custard by cooking the eggs and milk in 
a double boiler till they coat the back of a spoon, 
stirring while the mixture is cooking; soak the gelatine 
for ten minutes in the coffee, and add to the custard, 
which should be hot enough to dissolve the gelatine. 
Put in the sugar and stand the mixture aside to cool 
while the cream is being whipped; add the cream 
when the first mixture is nearly cold, stir in thor- 
oughly and turn into a wet mould. Chill before 
serving. 

Cold Wine Sauce 

1 cup sugar. yi cup claret. 

1 cup water. Juice of 1 lemon. 

Boil the sugar and water together till they form 
a thick syrup. Let the syrup cool, add the wine 
and lemon juice, and let the sauce become thoroughly 
cold before serving. 



PUDDINGS AND PUDDING SAUCES 101 

Xaple Satace 

2 egg yolks. W cup whipped cream. 

% cup hot maple syrup. Pinch of salt. 

Beat the yolks of the eggs well and pour the hot 
syrup over them. Cook in a double boiler till of 
the consistency of thin custard. When cold add the 
salt and whipped cream, and serve at once. 



Wine Sauce 

3 tablespoons butter. 1 cup fine sugar. 

3 tablespoons sherry. 

Beat the butter and sugar till light, put the bowl 
containing them over hot water and stir till the 
contents are creamy, and then add the wine. Serve 
at once. 

Cranberry Sauce 

1 quart cranberries. \yi cups water. 

2 cups sugar. 

Cook the cranberries and water till the berries are 
tender; then rub through a sieve to keep back the 
skins and seeds. Return to the fire, add the sugar 
and cook only until it is melted. Chill and serve. 

Foamy Sauce 

3 tablespoons apricot, 1 cup boiling water. 

marmalade or peach 1 tablespoon cornstarch. 

preserve. 2 tablespoons cold water. 

Juice of 1 lemon. 1 egg white. 

Sugar if requir^. 

Put the preserve, lemon juice and water into a 
saucepan and bring to the boiling point, adding a 
little sugar if it is needed, and stir in the cornstarch 
moistened with the cold water. Cook five minutes 
and pour over the stiffly-beaten white of egg, stirring 
constantly while this is being done. Serve at once. 



102 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

Hot Chocolate Sauce 

2 squares of chocolate. 1 cup milk. 

K cup suj^ar. 2 egg yolks. 

An inch stick of cinnamon or any other flavoring desired. 

Melt the chocolate in the upper vessel of a double 
boiler, add the milk a little at a time, and cook with 
the sugar and cinnamon over hot water. When 
scalding hot add the yolks of eggs well beaten, and 
stir till the sauce thickens. Remove the cinnamon 
before serving. 

Hard Sauce 

% cup butter. 2 tablespoons boiling water. 

1 cup powdered sugar. Flavoring to taste. 

Beat the butter in a bowl till creamy, then add 
half of the sugar and water; beat well, and add the 
remainder of the sugar and water. When light and 
fluffy add the flavoring and set aside in a cool place 
till wanted. If desired the flavoring may be omitted 
and a little nutmeg grated over the sauce in the 
serving dish. 

Note. — The addition of the water makes the 
sauce lighter and lessens the labor of beating. 



Chocolate Sauce (without egg) 

% cup sugar. yi cup milk. 

1 cup water. 1 tablespoon comstaroh* 

3 tablespoons grated choco* 1 inch stick cinnamon, 
late. 

Boil the sugar and water together to a 63niip, 
pour this over the chocolate and return to the sauce- 
pan with the cinnamon, and cook ten minutes. 
Moisten the cornstarch with the milk, stir into the 
boiling syrup; and cook five minutes longer. Re- 
move the cinnamon before serving. 



MEMORAIVDA 



UEMORAHDA 



PASTRY 

IN making pastry the best results are obtained by 
having all the ingredients as cold as possible, and 
keeping them so till the pastry goes into the oven. It 
is the sudden change in temperature, as much as 
the actual ingredients used, that makes pastry light. 
If soft butter and lukewarm water are used the 
result must be poor pastry — tough and not appetizing. 

For plain paste, lard or a mixture of lard and 
butter should be used; for very plain crusts, lard and 
good beef drippings; but for puff paste, butter must 
be used. 

It is often desirable to have pastry that is light, 
flaky and tender without being too rich, and this 
result can be attained by the addition of a little 
Rumford Baking Powder and the reduction of the 
amount of fat used. Where a rule calls for one and 
one-half cups of flour and twoAhirds of a cup of fat — 
lard or butter — the housekeeper may take half a cup of 
fat and a teaspoonfvl of Rumford Baking Powder to 
the cup and a half of flour, and have equally good results 
as to appearance and flavor, at much less expense. 

All paste is better if chilled before it is baked. If 
convenient it should be made the day before it is to 
be used. 

In making fruit pies always put the sugar with 
the fruit — not on top — or the crust will be soggy. 

A marble or slate pastry-board and a glass or 
china rolling-pin are the best for pastry, because of 
their coldness; but if the ordinary utensils are cold, 
good results will be obtained. 

Short Paste 

3 cups flour. 1 cup lard, or lard and 
I teaspoon salt. Dutter. 

1 teaspoon Rumford Bak- Ice-cold water to mix — 
ing Powder. about l}i cups. 

Sift together the flour, salt and baking powder; 
rub in lightly with the fingers the lard and butter, 

105 



106 BUMPOED COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

mix to a firm dough with the ice-cold water and roll 
out once on a floured board. Use for whatever pur- 
pose desired. 

Five-minttte Paste 

2 cups flour. K cup butter. 
% teaspoon salt. 1 egg volk. 

yi teaspoon Rumford Bak- Ice-cold water, 
ing Powder. 

Sift together the flour, salt and baking powder; then 
cream the butter in a bowl as for a cake. As soon as 
it is light and creamy, add the sifted flour, mixing it in 
with a knife, not touching at all with the hands. Beat 
the yolk of ogg and add a little ice water to it — 
probably about three-quarters of a cup will be required 
— to moisten the paste. Roll out once on a floured 
board. The egg may be omitted, but is an improvement 
if used. 

Flaky Paste 

3 cups flour. \yi cups lard, or butter and 
1 teaspoon salt. lard. 

Ice-cold water to mix. 

Sift the flour and salt together into a bowl, chop in 
the shortening with a knife till well mixed with the 
flour. Add ice-cold water to form a dough, cutting and 
mixing the paste thoroughly while adding the water. 
Flour a board and roll the paste out thinly, rolling 
only lengthwise, and keeping the edges straight; then 
fold evenly into three layers (lengthwise as a sheet of 
paper would be folded to fit a business envelope), turn 
it half around and roll again. Repeat the folding and 
rolling twice, and chill the paste if possible before 
baking. It is the folding and rolling that produce the 
flakes. 

Puff Paste 
yi pound pastry flour. 1 teaspoon salt. 

yi pound butter. 1 egg yolk. 

1 tablespoon lemon juice. Ice-cold water. 

Beat the egg and add to it the water and lemon 
juice; sift flour and salt, and mix all these ingredients 
to a firm dough. Roll out into an oblong sheet. 
Wash the butter and press into a flat cake half as 



PASTRY 107 

large as the dough, lay it on one end and cover with 
the paste, like a fruit turnover. Press the edges 
w€fll together, roll out and fold into three layers. 
Cool and roll again, repeating the process till the 
paste has been rolled seven times. Put on ice when 
necessary. Bake in a hot oven, and if possible make 
it the day before it is required for use. The butter 
may be divided into three portions and put in after 
each rolling if desired, but the seven rollings must 
be made after all the butter has been used. 

Apple Cttstard Pie 

3 large tart apples. ^ pint milk. 

yi cup sugar. Nutmeg or cinnamon to taste. 

2 eggs. Paste. 

Peel, core and stew the apples with just enough 
water to prevent burning, rub through a sieve, and 
add the sugar and spice. Beat the eggs — yolks 
and whites separately, — add the yolks to the milk, 
stir in the flavored apples, and fold into the mixture 
the stifily-beaten whites of the eggs. Line a deep 
pie plate with paste, pour in the filling, and put 
strips of paste lattice-fashion over the top. Bake in 
a moderate oven about half an hour. 



Ulnce Pie Filling 

1 pound seeded raisins. 1 pound sugar. 

1 pound currants. 2 pounds peeled, cored and 

1 pound finely-chopped chopped apples. 

beef suet. \yi teaspoons mixed spices* 

The grated rind of 2 1 cup brandy. 

lemons. 1 tablespoon salt. 
% poimd candied orange peel and citron chopped fine. 

Prepare the fruits by seeding the raisins, washing and 
drying both these and the currants; add the suet very 
finely chopped. Run the peel through a meat chopper 
or chop it very fine with a knife, and mix all together 
with the sugar, spices, grated lemon rind, apples, salt 
and brandy. Keep at least a week before using, stirring 
occasionally. This quantity will make about eight 
good-sized pies, and will keep all winter. 



108 BUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

Cranberry and Raisin Pie 

IK cup^ cranberries. l^ cup sugar. 

1 cup raisins. Paste. 

Seed the raisins and chop the cranberries; add the 
fiugar, and bake in a shallow pie plate between two 
crusts. 

Pumpkin Pie 

2 cups steamed or baked 1 teaspoon cinnamon. 

pumpkin. 1 teaspoon ginger. 

1 cup sugar. 1 pint scalded milk. 

K teaspoon salt. 2 large eggs. 

Paste. 

Rub the pumpkin through a sieve and add to it 
the sugar, salt, spices, milk and well-beaten eggs. 
Cool and use to fill a large pie plate which has been 
lined with paste. Bake in a moderate oven about forty 
minutes. 

Lemon Meringue Pie 

1 cup water. Tlie juice and grated rind 

1 cup sugar. of 1 lemon. 

2 heaping teaspoons com- A pinch of salt. 

starch. 2 tablespoons sugar for 

2 eggs. the meringue. 

Paste. 

Boil the water and sugar together^ add the corn- 
starch moistened with a little cold water, and cook 
five minutes. Then put in the yolks of the eggs, the 
lemon juice, rind and salt. Cool slightly and pour 
into a previously baked crust. Cover with a meringue 
made by beating the whites of the eggs with the two 
tablespoons of sugar. Put into a moderately warm 
oven to set and brown the meringue. 

The reason so many meringues are failures is be- 
cause they are baked in too hot an oven and conse- 
quently browned before the white of the egg has had 
time to set all the way through. 

Orange Cream Pie 

3 eggs. Grated rind of 2 oranges and 

1 cup sugar. juice of 1. 

2 tablespoons cornstarch. lyi cups milk. 

Paste. 



PASTRY 109 

Separate the whites from the yolks of the eggs and 
beat the yolks, with half the sugar, till light. Mix the 
cornstarch smoothly with one-fourth cup of the milk, 
and scald the remainder in a double boiler. When 
almost boiling, stir in the cornstarch and cook till 
thick; add the yolks of the eggs, sugar, orange rind 
and juice; cool slightly and pour into a previously 
baked crust. Beat the whites of the eggs stiffly, 
add the remainder of the sugar, and flavor, if liked, 
with a little orange juice or grated rind. Pile on top 
of the pie, and put in a moderate oven to set and brown 
slightly. 

Cheese Tartlets 

2 tablespoons butter. 1 teaspoon Rumford Baking 
% cup bread crumbs. Powder. 

2 small eggs. W cup milk. 
yi cup grated cheese. Paste. 

Beat the butter to a cream, add the bread crumbs 
alternately with the well-beaten eggs, stir in the 
cheese, and then add the milk and baking powder. 
Line small tins with paste and put a tablespoonful 
of the cheese mixture in each. Bake in a moderate 
oven about fifteen minutes. Serve hot or cold. 

Cheese Cakes 

IK cups cottage cheese. 3 tablespoons cream. 

yi cup sugar. Grated rind of 1 lemon. 

3 eggs. Paste. 

Mix together the cheese, sugar, cream and lemon 
rind; then add the eggs, yolks and whites well beaten 
together. Line small tins with paste and nearly fill 
them with the cheese-cake mixture. Bake in a 
moderate oven about fifteen minutes. 

English Fruit Tart 

Fresh fruit. Sugar to taste. 

Short or Flaky paste. 

Prepare the fruit and place with the sugar in a 
deep baking-dish. Add a little water to make juice, 
the quantity depending on the fruit used. Roll the 
crust thinly and cover the fruit with it, wetting the 



110 RUHFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

edge of the dish to make the crust adhere. Bake in 
a moderate oven about half an hour. Serve hot or 
cold and with or without cream or custard. 

Any fresh fruit, such as apples, plums, currants, etc., 
may be used. 

Lemon Cheese Cakes 

K cup butter. 2 large eggs. 

% cup sugar. Puff paste patty sheUs, pre- 
Grated rind and strained viously baked, 

juice of 2 lemons. 

Put the butter, sugar, lemon juice and rind in the 
inner vessel of a double boiler and heat over hot 
water. When thoroughly heated, add the eggs well 
beaten, and stir till the mixture thickens. Set aside to 
become thoroughly cold and then place a spoonful in 
each patty shell The lemon cheese mixture will keep 
for months. 

Puff Paste Patties. 

Roll puff paste very thinly and cut into rounds, or 
any other shape preferred. With a cutter several 
sizes smaller remove the centres from half the por- 
tions first cut; place the rings thus formed on the 
whole portions of paste, first wetting the edges of these 
that the rings may adhere. Chill thoroughly before 
baking. 

Suet Crust for Boiled Puddings 

3 cups flour. 1 cup beef suet, free from 
1 teaspoon salt. skin. 

1 teaspoon Rumford Bak- Ice-cold water, 
ing Powder. 

Sift together the flour, salt and baking powder; 
add the finely-chopped suet, and mix to a firm 
dough with the water; roll out thinly and use to line 
a well-greased bowl. Fill with fruit sweetened to 
taste, adding a little water to make a juice. Cover 
with more crust and tie a floured cloth over the top. 
Steam or boil at least two and a half hours. 

For a meat pudding substitute uncooked meat, 
well seasoned, cut in small pieces. With a meat 
pudding a little hole may be cut in the top crust 



PASTRY 111 

after the pudding is turned out for serving and a 
cup of boiling water poured in to form additional 
gravy. 

Rumford Dumplings 

IK cups flour. About ^ cup milk (enough 

yi teaspoon salt. to make of the consist- 

1}^ teaspoons Rumford ency of biscuit dough). 
Baking Powder. 

Sift together flour, salt and baking powder; add 
milk, and then pat or roll on a board till half an 
inch thick. Cut out with a very small cutter and 
drop into the boiling stew. Cook ten minutes with- 
out removing the lid of the saucepan. If the lid is 
lifted before the dough is cooked the rush of cold 
air may cause the dumplings to fall. 

Boiled Fruit Dumplings 

Make a dough by the rule previously given for 
Rumford Dumplings, roll as directed, and cut into 
squares of about three inches. Put a spoonful of 
berries, plums or a small pared and cored apple in 
the centre of the dough with sugar to taste. Wet 
and press the edges of the dough firmly over the 
fruit so that they will cling together. Tie each 
dumpling in a square of cheese cloth and plunge into 
fast boiling water. Cook from half to three-quarters 
of an hour, according to the fruit used. Serve with 
a hard or liquid sauce. 

For baked apple or other fruit dumplings inclose 
the fruit in a square of either short or flaky paste 
(see pages 105 and 106), press the edges firmly together 
and bake in a moderately hot oven about twenty 
minutes to half an hour, according to the fruit used. 
Serve hot with a hard or liquid sauce. 

Egg ]>umplings 

1 egg. 1 teaspoon Rumford Baking 

8 tablespoonB milk. Powder. 

^ cup nour. ^ teaspoon salt. 

Beat the egg till light, add the milk and mix. 
Sift together flour, salt and baking powder, and add 



112 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

the egg and milk to these to form a heavy batter, 
using a little more milk if necessary. Drop by 
spoonfuls into hot gravy, and cook fifteen minut^ 
without removing the lid from the saucepan. 

Lobster Patties 
(10 patties) 

1 cup cream sauce. 1 teaspoon lemon juice. 

1 cup lobster meat. Salt and pepper to taste. 
A slight grating of nutmeg. 1 egff yolk. 

Puff paste patty snells. 

Make the cream sauce by blending in a saucepan 
two tablespoons of butter with the same quantity 
of flour; then, when smooth, add half a cup each of 
milk and thin cream. Stir till boiling, cook five 
minutes and then put in the seasonings, and lobster 
cut into dice. 

Heat thoroughly and, just before serving, add the 
yolk of the egg. Fill the shells and serve. 

Oyster Patties 
(10 patties) 

8 tablespoons butter. 1 teaspoon lemon juice. 

2 tablespoons flour. Salt and pepper or cayenne. 
^2 cup cream. 1 cup solid oysters. 

y2 cup oyster liquor. Puff paste patty shells. 

Blend the butter and flour in a saucepan, add the 
cream and oyster liquor, stir till boiling and cook 
slowly five minutes longer. Pick over the oysters, 
free them from all bits of shell, scald them in their 
own liquor (if very large divide them), and add to 
the hot sauce, together with the seasonings. Bring 
almost to the boiling point, and fill the shells. Serve 
hot. 

Chicken Patties 

Prepare these the same as Oyster Patties, substi- 
tuting chicken liquor for oyster liquor, and diced 
chicken for the oysters. A little grated lemon rind 
may also be substituted for the lemon juice. 



memorauda 



UEMORAITDA 



BREAD, ROLLS, MUFFINS, ETC. 

IN making breads raised with baking powder always 
sift the powder with the dry ingredients to insure 
thorough incorporation and perfect mixing. In 
making baking powder biscuits, always add enough 
liquid to make a very soft dough, as this is one of 
the first requirements for good biscuits. Have the 
liquid cold, and mix with a flexible knife in prefer- 
ence to handling it with either a spoon or the hand, 
because the steel blade is cold, and cuts and mixes 
more thoroughly. The less biscuits are handled, the 
better. If placed a little apart in the pan they will 
be lighter and more crusty. 

Always add liquid to dry ingredients — they will 
mix more smoothly. The smaller the biscuits and 
muflins, the hotter may be the oven. To obtain a 
brown crust, brush over with milk before baking. 
For a tender crust, brush with melted butter. 

Gems and muffins will be lighter and crisper if 
baked in pans that are hissing hot before the batter 
is placed in them. 



Rumford Biscuit 

1 quart flour. 2 tablespoons butter or lard. 

1 teaspoon salt. Milk or milk and water to 

2 rounding teaspoons Rumford mix (about 1>^ to 

Bakmg Powder. 2 cups) . 

Sift well together the flour, salt and baking pow- 
der; rub in the fat as lightly as possible with the 
fingers, just working it until the fat is well blended 
with the flour. Then mix to a very soft dough with 
the milk, or milk and water, having this always as 
cold as possible. Mix with a flexible knife in prefer- 
ence to either a spoon or the hand, as the steel blade 
of the knife is colder than the spoon, and also because 
it cuts and mixes the dough more thoroughly. Turn 
the dough onto a well-floured board, and roll or pat 
it with the hand until about three-quarters of an 

115 



116 BUMPORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

inch thick. Cut into biscuit and lay them, not 
touching each other, on a baking-pan. Bake in a 
quick oven twelve or fourteen minutes. 

The chief requirements for good biscuit are: 1. A very 
soft dough, so soft as to be almost sticky; 2. Very little 
handling, because much manipulation destroys their 
lightness; 3. A very quick oven. If biscuit are not 
allowed to touch each other in the pan, they wUl be 
lighter and more delicate than when placed close to^ 
gether. 

Whole Wheat Biscuit 

2 cups whole wheat flour. 1 small egg. 

2 teaspoons Rumford Bak- U teaspoon salt. 

ing Powder. 2 tablespoons butter or lard. 

About 1 cup milk. 

Sift together the flour, salt and baking powder; 
rub in the butter or lard and mix to a light dough 
with the egg and milk. Roll out on a floured board, 
cut into biscuits and bake about fifteen minutes in 
a hot oven. 

Rye Biscuit 

2 cups rye flour. 2 tablespoons butter. 

>^ teaspoon salt. 1 small egg. 

2 teaspoons Rumford Bak- About 1 cup milk, 
ing Powder. 

Sift together flour, salt and baking powder; rub 
in the butter and mix to a light dough with the egg 
and milk. Roll out on a floured board, cut into 
biscuits and bake about fifteen minutes in a hot 
oven. 

Potato Biscuit 

2 good-sized potatoes. X teaspoon salt. 

3 cups flour. X cup butter or lard, 
3 teaspoons Rumford Bak- 1 egg. 

ing Powder. About 1 cup milk. 

Boil and mash the potatoes, having them free 
from lumps. Sift the flour, salt and baking powder; 



BREAD, BOLLS, MUFFINS, ETC. 117 

add the potatoes and rub in the butter or lard. Mix 
to a light dough with the egg and milk, roll out a 
little thinner than ordinary biscuit, and bake in a 
hot oven. Serve as soon as done. 



Maple Rolls 

IK cnpa flour. X teaspoon salt. 

IK teaspoons Rumford 2 tablespoons butter. 

Balung Powder. About H cup milk. 

Scraped maple sugar. 

Sift together the flour, salt and baking powder; 
rub in the butter the same as for Rumford Biscuit 
and, when well mixed, add the milk, using enough 
to make a soft dough. Roll this out on a floured 
board, about one-third inch thick, spread thickly 
with the scraped maple sugar, roll up like a jelly 
roll and cut into slices with a very sharp knife. Lay 
these on a greased baking-pan and bake from twelve 
to fifteen minutes. 

Parker House Rolls 

2 cups flour. 2 teaspoons sugar. 

2 teaspoons Rumford Bak« K teaspoon salt. 

ing Powder. 2 tablespoons butter. 

K cup milk. 

Mix as for Rumford Biscuit. Roll to one-third 
inch in thickness, cut with a round or oval cutter, 
and crease in the centre with the handle of a case- 
knife first dipped in flour. Brush one-half with 
melted butter and fold over. Put in a pan, one-half 
inch apart, and bake in a quick oven fifteen minutes. 



Quick Graham Rolls 

2 cups Graham flour. 2 rounding teaspoons Rumford 

1 cup white flour. Bakm« Powder. 

K teaspoon salt. 2 tablespoons butter or lard. 

About IK cups milk. 

Sift together the flour, salt and baking powder; 
rub in the fat and mix to a smooth dough with the 



lis BUMFOBD COMPLETE COOS BOOK 

milk. Flour a board well, turn out the dough, 
divide it into small portions and form into rolls the 
size and thickness of two fingers. Bake on a fiat, 
greased pan, brushing the rolls over with softened 
butter before baking. 



French Rolls 

1 pint milk. 3 pints flonr. 

2 eggs. 3 tablespoons butter. 
1 teaspoon salt. 1 yeast cake. 

2 teaspoons sugar. 

Have the milk lukewarm; add to it the well- 
beaten eggs and salt. Sift the fiour and rub the 
butter into it; mix the yeast and sugar together, 
working them with the back of a teaspoon imtil the 
yeast liquifies, then pour it into the milk and egg 
and add all these to the flour. Knead to a dough as 
for bread; let it rise three hours, having the dough 
covered that a crust may not form on the top, and 
keep it in a warm room free from draughts. Form 
into rolls and let these rise again about half an hour, 
or until they are very light. The length of time will 
depend somewhat on the temperature of the room. 

Bake the rolls in a quick oven, brushing over with 
butter before baking to brown them more. 



Larohmont Muffins 

2 cups flour. 1 tablespoon sugar. 

U teaspoon salt. 1 tablespoon melted butter* 

2 teaspoons Kumf ord Bak- 2 eggs, 

ing Powder. 1 cup milk. 

Sift together the flour, salt and baking powder; 
add the sugar, then the beaten yolks of eggs, milk 
and melted butter. Beat thoroughly and fold in 
gently the stiffly-beaten whites of the eggs. Half 
fill greased pans and bake about twenty minutes in 
a moderately hot oven. 



BBEAD, ROLLS, MUPPINS, ETC. 119 

Cream MufSna 

IK cups flour. 2 eggs. 

>5 teaspoon salt. % cup melted butter. 

\% teaspoons Rumford Bak- % cup thin cream, 
ing Powder. 

Sift together the flour, salt and baking powder; 
add the yolks of the eggs, melted butter and cream, 
and beat well. Last of all fold in the stiffly-beaten 
whites of the eggs and bake in greased muffin pans in 
a moderate oven about twenty minutes. 

Graham Gems 

3 cups Graham flour. 2 eggs. 

% teaspoon salt. 3 cups milk. 

2 rounding teaspoons Rumford 2 tablespoons melted butter. 
Bakmg Powder. 

Sift together the flour, salt and baking powder; 
beat the eggs well and add them with the milk and 
butter to form a batter. Bake in hot, greased gem 
pans in a moderately hot oven about twenty min- 
utes. 

Date Gems 

1 cup chopped dates. K c^P butter. 

2 cups flour. 1 egg. 

% teaspoon salt. IK cups mflk. 

2 teaspoons Rumford Baking Powder. 

Stone the dates and chop coarsely. Sift together 
the flour, salt and baking powder. Rub the butter 
into the flour, then mix in the dates and form to a 
stiff batter with the beaten egg and milk. Bake in 
hot, well-greased gem pans in a moderate oven 
about twenty minutes. 

Pop-Overs 

1 cup sifted flour. % teaspoon salt. 

1 cup milk. 2 eggs. 

Sift together the flour and salt; add the eggs 
well beaten, also the milk. Beat hard with a Dover 



120 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

beater for two minutes, then pour at once into hiss- 
ing hot, greased gem pans, and bake about twenty- 
five minutes in a hot oven. 



Quick Breakfast Puffs 

2 eggs. ly^ cups flour. 

1 cup milk. 2 teaspoons Rumford Baking 

1 tablespoon melted butter. Powder. 

}4 teaspoon salt. 

Beat the eggs very thoroughly and add the milk 
and butter. Sift the flour, salt and baking powder 
twice; add the liquid ingredients, and beat two 
minutes. Pour into hot, well-greased muflin pans 
and bake twenty minutes in a hot oven. 



Oatmeal Stidsa 

3 cups flour. }i cup butter. 

yi teaspoon salt. 1>^ cups scalded milk. 

1 tablespoon sugar. U cup oatmeal or rolled oats. 

3 teaspoons Rumfora Bakmg Powder. 

Sift together the flour, salt, sugar and baking 
powder; rub in the butter, scald the milk and pour 
it over the oatmeal; cool, mix with the other ingre- 
dients, and work with the hands till smooth; then 
roll into sticks about the length and thickness of a 
lead pencil. Bake about ten minutes in a rather 
hot oven. 



Hot Cross Buns 

1>^ cups milk. >i cup currants and raisins 

}i cup butter. mixed. 

}4 teaspoon cinnamon. }i cup sugar. 

1 quart flour. }4 yeast cake. 

}i teaspoon salt. 1 egg. 

1 teaspoon sugar (for yeast). 

Scald the milk with the butter and sugar and 
allow the mixture to cool till lukewarm. Work the 



BREAD, ROLLS, MUFFINS, ETC. 121 

yeast, with the teaspoon of sugar, till it liquifies, and 
add it to the milk; add also the egg lightly beaten. 
Put in the currants and raisins, then sift and add the 
flour, salt and cinnamon. Knead to a dough the 
same as for bread, and let it rise in a warm place free 
from draughts till very light. Divide into portions 
a little larger than biscuits, work till smooth, roll 
into rounds and place on a greased baking-pan, a 
little distance apart. Let them rise once more till 
light, then bake in a moderate oven. Just before 
baking mark a cross on top of each bun. When 
nearly done brush over with milk or white of egg, 
sprinkle with sugar and return to the oven for a 
moment* 

Riimford Whole Wheat Bread 

3 cups fine whole wheat Milk or milk and water to 

flour. mix to a light, soft 

3 teaspoons Rumford Bak dough (about IK cups), 

ing Powder. 2 teaspoons sugar it desired. 

1 teaspoon salt. 

Sift together twice the dry ingredients; place in a 
large bowl and mix to a dough with the milk or 
milk and water, mixing with either a spoon or knife. 
When smooth turn into a greased pan and cover 
with another pan inverted, unless the double round 
sandwich pan is used, in which case fill the lower 
section of pan. Let the bread stand five or ten 
minutes, then bake in a steady oven, not too hot, 
about forty-five minutes. 



Rumford Dyspeptic Bread 

1 pint flour. 2 rounding teaspoons Rum- 

1 teaspoon salt. ford Baking Powder. 

Milk and water to mix. 

Sift together the flour, salt and baking powder, 
and mix to a soft dough with the milk and water. 
Knead two minutes, turn into a greased pan and 



122 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

allow the bread to rise ten minutes before baking. 
Bake slowly for forty minutes. 

This bread can be eaten by those with weak digestion 
who can not assimilate bread prepared vrith yeast. 

Southern Egg Bread 

1 pint white corn meal. 3 eggs. 

1 teaspoon salt. 1 tablespoon melted butter. 

2 teaspoons Rumford Bak- 1>^ cups milk. 

ing Powder. 1 cup cold boiled rice. 

Sift together the corn meal, salt and baking pow- 
der; add the eggs well beaten, then the melted 
butter, milk and rice. Beat thoroughly, pour into 
a shallow, well-greased pan and bake half an hour 
in a hot oven. 

Com Bread 

2 eggs. 3 heaping tablespoons flour. 

}4 teaspoon salt. Yellow corn meal to form a 

2 cups milk. batter. 

3 tablespoons sugar. 2 heaping teaspoons Rumford 

Baking Powder. 

Beat the eggs well, add the salt, milk and sugar, 
and beat in the flour and baking powder with enough 
corn meal to form a soft batter; bake in shallow, 
well-greased pans in a moderate oven about half an 
hour. The exact quantity of corn meal can not be 
given — usually about two cups will be sufficient. 



Baked Brown Bread 

2 cups Graham flour. 1 level teaspoon soda. 

1 cup white flour. }4 cup sugar. 

}^ teaspoon salt. 1 pint sour milk. 

Sift the flour, salt and soda twice; add the sugar 
and mix to a batter with the milk. Pour into a 
well-greased pan and bake in a slow oven about forty 
minutes. 



BBEAD, BOLLS, MUFFINS, ETC. 123 

Steamed Brown Bread 

2 OTips Graham flour. X teaspoon salt. 

1 cup yellow com meal. }^ cup molasses. 

2 teaspoons Rumford Bak- ^ cup raisins. 

ing Powder. 1 egg. 

2 cups sweet muk. 

Sift together the flour, corn meal, salt and baking 
powder; add the raisins and molasses, and mix with 
the beaten egg and milk. 

Have ready well-greased tins with tightly fitting 
lids, fill two-thirds full of the batter; grease and fit 
on the covers, and steam three hours. The loaves 
may be placed in the oven for a few minutes after 
steaming, if a dry crust is desired. 



Yeast Bread 

yi cake compressed yeast. 1 teaspoon salt. 

1 teaspoon sugar. Lukewarm water or milk 
3 pints sifted flour. and water to mix (about 

1 tablespoon lard or butter 2>^ cups). 

Work the yeast and sugar together with the back 
of a teaspoon till they become liquid; add three- 
fourths cup of lukewarm water and a teaspoon of 
flour, and stand aside in a warm place while the 
flour is prepared. 

Sift the flour and salt together into a large bowl 
and rub in the shortening. Make a hollow in the 
centre of the flour, pour in the yeast and add nearly 
the remainder of the lukewarm liquid; knead till a 
soft, elastic dough is formed, using the remainder of 
the liquid if required. The exact quantity of liquid 
can not be given, this depending on the quality of the 
flour. Knead steadily and quickly for twenty min- 
utes, working in all the dry flour and adding a little 
more if the dough sticks to the bowl or the hands, 
but avoid adding more than is absolutely necessary. 

Cover the dough with a cloth, stand in a moder- 
ately warm place free from draughts, and let it rise 
till it has doubled its bulk. In the daytime, in a 



124 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

warm kitchen, this will probably be about four 
hours; at night, when the temperature is lower, the 
bread will be ready to mould into loaves early in the 
morning. Should it have risen fully before the cook 
is ready to attend to it, the dough may be "cut 
down" from the sides of the bowl and allowed to 
eome up again. This will prevent over-raising, and 
consequent souring. 

In forming into loaves, turn the dough onto a 
lightly-floured board, divide into portions, knead 
slightly and put into greased pans; cover with a 
cloth and allow the dough to double its bulk. 

In baking bread have the oven only moderately 
hot when the bread first goes in so as to allow it 
to rise to its fullest extent; then increase the heat to 
form a good crust, and, finally, reduce it again to 
let the centre of the loaf cook thoroughly. Loaves 
this size require about three-quarters of an hour to 
bake and when done must be removed at once from 
the pans and put where the air will circulate freely 
around them till cold. 



MEMORANDA 



memorauda 



WAFFLES, GRIDDLE CAKES, ETC. 

Rumf Old Waffles 

1 cup flour. 2 eggs. 

% teaspoon salt. 1 cup milk 

2 teaspoons Rumford Baking 2 tablespoons melted butter. 

Powder. 

Sift together the flour, salt and baking powder; 
add the yolks of the eggs and milk, beating well so 
as to make a smooth batter. Stir in the melted 
butter and, at the last moment, put in the stiffly- 
beaten whites of the eggs. Bake in hot, well-greased 
waffle irons, turning the cakes just as soon as pos- 
sible after the batter is put in all the compartments 
of the iron. 

Com Meal Waffles 

^ cup corn meal. 1 teaspoon salt. 

IK cups boiling water. 2 teaspoons Rumford Baking 

1 cup milk. Powder. 

% cup flour. % cup sugar. 

2 eggs. 

Cook the corn meal in the boiling water till quite 
soft; add the salt and milk and set aside to cool. 
Sift together flour, sugar and baking powder; add the 
well-beaten eggs, then the corn meal mixture, with 
more milk if necessary to make the batter thin enough 
to pour. Bake in hot, well-greased waffle irons, and 
serve as soon as cooked. 

Cereal Waffles 

1 cup cold, cooked oat- 2 eggs. 

meal or other cereal. 1 cup milk. 
1 cup Graham or entire 2 teaispoons Rumford Baking 

wheat flour. Powder: 

yi teaspoon salt. 

Sift together the flour, salt and baking powder; 
add the yolks of the eggs and the milk, then the cold 
cereal, beating this in well to eliminate all lumps. 

127 



128 EUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth and fold 
them gently into the batter. Cook at once in hot^ 
lightly-greased waffle irons. 



Pound Cake Waffles 

K cup butter. 1J4 cups flour, 

1 cup fine granulated 1 teaspoon Rumford Baking 

sugar. Powder. 

5 eggs. }4 teaspoon salt. 

1 teaspoon lemon or vanilla flavoring. 

Beat the butter and sugar to a cream; add the 
well-beaten yolks of the eggs, then the flour, salt 
and baking powder sifted together. Put in the fla- 
voring and beat the batter thoroughly. At the last 
moment fold in lightly the whites of the eggs beaten 
to a stiff froth, and cook as ordinary waffles. 



Rye Griddle Cakes 

2 cups rye flour. 1 teaspoon salt. 
1 cup entire wheat flour. 2 eggs. 

3 teaspoons Rumford Baking 1 pint milk. 

Powder. 

Sift together the two flours, salt and baking pow- 
der; add the milk and then the eggs well beaten. 
Beat thoroughly and cook at once on a hot, lightly- 
greased griddle. 

Com Meal Griddle Cakes 

1 cup corn meaL ^ teaspoon salt. 
Boilmg water. 1 tablespoon molasses (if 

2 tablespoons flour. liked). 
2 teaspoons Rumford Bak* 1 egg. 

ing Powder. 1 cup milk. 

Scald the com meal with just enough boiling water 
to cover it. Let it stand five minutes, then add 
flour, salt and molasses. Thin to a batter with the 
beaten egg and milk, and add the baking powder 



WAFFLES, GRIDDLE CAKES, ETC. 129 

last, beating it in well. Cook at once on a hot, 
well-greased griddle. 

Rice Griddle Cakes 

1 cup warm, boiled rice. 2 tablespoons melted butter. 

y^ teaspoon salt. 2 eggs 

1 cup milk. 2 tablespoons flour. 

1 teaspoon Rumford Baking Powder. 

Put the rice in a bowl and add to it the salt, milk, 
butter and yolks of the eggs; then stir in the flour 
sifted with the baking powder, and lastly add the 
stiffly-beaten whites of eggs. Cook quickly on a hot, 
greased griddle. 

Potato Griddle Scones 

3 cups flour. 2 tablespoons butter. 

% teaspoon salt. 1 egg. 

2 teaspoons Rumford Bak- About 1 cup milk. 

ing Powder. 1 cup mashed potatoes. 

Sift together the flour, salt and baking powder; 
rub the butter in lightly, add the potatoes and mix 
to a soft dough with the milk and beaten egg. Roll 
out about three-quarters of an inch thick, cut into 
three-cornered cakes and cook on a hot, well-greased 
griddle. 

Quick Buckwheat Cakes 

IK <^ups buckwheat flour. 2 rounding teaspoons Rum- 
1 cup white flour. ford Baking Powder. 

1 egg. 1 teaspoon salt. 

IX <^P'3 milk. 

Sift together the buckwheat, flour, salt and bak- 
ing powder; add the egg well beaten, also the milk 
gradually. Beat well to remove any lumps, and 
cook at once on a hot, greased griddle. Two table- 
spoons of molasses may be added before baking, 
if desired. This slightly sweetens as well as helps 
to brown the cakes. 



130 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

French Pancakes 

1 cup floup. % teaspoon salt. 

1 teaspoon Rumford Bak- 2 eggs. 

ing Powder. \% cups milk. 

Preserve. 

Sift together the flour, salt and baking powder; 
beat and add the eggs with the milk, being careful 
that there are no lumps. Melt a teaspoon of butter 
in a frying-pan, and when hot pour in enough batter 
to just cover the bottom of the pan. Cook golden 
brown, then turn and cook the other side. Spread 
with the preserve and roll up and sprinkle with 
sugar just before serving. 

Cream Pancakes 

2 tablespoons flour. yi teaspoon salt. 
1 teaspoon Rumford Bak- 2 egg yolks, 

ing Powder. 1 cup thin cream. 

1 tal>lespoon sugar. 

Sift together the flour, salt and baking powder; 
add the yolks of the eggs, the cream and sugar. 
Beat well, and cook at once on a hot, lightly-greased 
griddle. Serve with sugar or maple syrup. 



German Pancakes 

1 tablespoon butter. 1 heaping tablespoon flour. 

4 eggs. y^ teaspoon salt. 

1 cup milk. 

Separate the whites from the yolks of the eggs, 
beat both thoroughly and add the flour and salt to 
the yolks. When well mixed stir in the milk and, 
at the last moment, fold in the stiffly-beaten whites. 
Melt the butter in a large frying-pan, pour in the 
batter and cook over a moderately hot fire till it 
begins to set; then transfer the pan to a hot oven to 
finish cooking. Turn onto a hot dish and serve with 
apple sauce. 



MEMORAIIDA 



MEMORANDA 



CAKE 

IN cake making, perhaps even more than in any 
other branch of cookery, special attention must 
be paid not only to exact measurements, but to 
correct methods of manipulation. 

Flour, pulverized sugar and similar ingredients 
must all be sifted once before measuring as they are 
liable to "pack" in the sack or barrel in which they 
are kept. Soda, spices and baking powder should 
be stirred lightly and mixed before measuring, for the 
same reason. 

The ingredients used for cake making should always 
be the best obtainable: best tub butter, fresh eggs, 
fine granulated sugar and, preferably, pastry flour, 
if perfect results are to be obtained. Flours vary in 
thickening qualities, therefore the exact amount of 
liquid can not always be stated. 

There are three methods of mixing: stirring, beat- 
ing, and cutting or folding. 

In stirring, the spoon is not lifted from the bowl, 
and the motion may be described as a circular one. 

In beating, the object desired is to get all the air 
possible into the mixture; the faster we beat the 
more air will be incorporated in the batter, and the 
cake in consequence will be lighter; but care must be 
taken that after a cake is beaten, no stirring motion 
is allowed, as this would undo the good already 
accomplished. 

The term "folding" applies more especially to the 
mixing and blending of the whites of stiffly-beaten 
eggs which are added just before putting the cake 
batter in the pans. The motion is that of lifting the 
batter from the bottom of the bowl, folding it over 
the beaten whites, mixing them in and continuing the 
process till the whites of eggs are no longer seen on 
top of the batter. The whole process must be per- 
formed with great care to avoid destroying the light- 
ness of the air cells in either batter or eggs. 

133 



134 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

In beating butter and sugar to a cream, never 
warm them nor the bowl, for if the warming is con- 
tinued a little too long both flavor and texture of the 
cake will sufifer. If the butter is very hard and it is 
not convenient to leave it in a warm kitchen to soften 
slowly, a tablespoon of boiling water may be added 
to the butter and sugar in the bowl, to soften the 
butter just enough to make it cream readily. 

If whites and yolks of eggs are separated, add the 
whites, well beaten, just before placing the cake in 
pans. This method makes a lighter, flufBer cake, but 
one which will dry sooner than if the yolks and whites 
are beaten together. 

Fruit should be washed and thoroughly dried 
before being added to cake. 

Most cake requires a moderately hot oven, but 
should not be baked too quickly at first. As soon as 
the cake has risen well the heat may be increased a 
little to give a good crust. Cake is done as soon as it 
shrinks a little from the sides of the pan. Another 
test is to press the centre of the cake with the finger 
and if firm to the touch, it is ready to come out of 
the oven. Testing with a broom straw is also a safe 
rule. If the straw after having been pressed well 
into the centre of the cake comes out clean, the cake 
is done. If sticky, bake a little longer* 



Lemon Cake 

2 scant cups sugar. 2 rounding teaspoons Rton-i 
yi cup butter. ford Baking Powder. 

3 eggs. Grated rind of 1 lemon. 
1 cup milk. K teaspoon salt. 

3 cups flour. 

Beat the butter with half the sugar; add gradually 
the remainder of the sugar together with the well- 
beaten eggs. Next, put in the grated lemon, then 
the milk, and lastly the flour sifted with the salt and 
baking powder. Bake about forty minutes in a 
moderate oven, and cover with lemon frosting. 



CAKE 135 

Ckocolate Lool Cake 

1}4 cups sugar. 2 cups flour. 

^ cup butter. 2 teaspoons Rumf ord Baking 

2 eggs. Powder. 

1 cup milk. 1 teaspoon vanilla extract. 

2 squares chocolate. 

Beat to a cream one cup of the sugar with the 
butter; add the eggs well beaten, th^i half a cup of 
the milk and the vanilla. Sift together the flour and 
baking powder, and beat them into the other ingredi- 
ents. Put the remainder of the sugar and milk, with 
the chocolate, into a saucepan and cook till the 
chocolate is dissolved; add to the cake batter, beat 
well, and bake in a moderate oven about three- 
quarters of an hour. 

Coffee Chocolate Cake 

% cup butter. K *up strong coffee. 

2 cups sugar. 3 cups flour. 

2 eggs. 2 teaspoons Rumford Baking 

yi cup milk. Powder. 

1 square chocolate. ^ teaspoon salt. 

1 teaspoon vanilla extract. 

Beat the butter and sugar till light and creamy, 
adding the well-beaten yolks of the eggs as soon as 
the butter and sugar are well mixed; then put in the 
chocolate, which has been softened by standing over 
hot water, the cofiEee and milk. Add the flour, bak- 
ing powder and salt sifted together, and then the 
vanilla. Beat vigorously and at the last moment 
before baking fold in the stiffly-beaten whites of the 
eggs. Bake about three-quarters of an hour in two 
loaf-cake pans, having the oven moderately hot. 
Frost, if desired. 

White Cake 

1 cup butter. J^ teaspoon salt. 

2 cups pulverized sugar. 2 teaspoons Rumford Baking 

1 cup milk. Powder. 

2 cups flour. 7 egg whites. 

Beat the butter and sugar to a cream; add the milk, 
then the flour, salt and baking powder sifted together; 



136 EUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

fold in very gently the stiffly-beaten whites of the 
eggs and turn into a greased pan. Bake in a moder- 
ate oven about three-quarters of an hour. 



Sultana Cake 

2 cups flour. }4 cup sugar. 

2 teaspoons Rumford Bak- }i cup sultana raisins. 

ing Powder. 1 egg. 

}i teaspoon salt. }i cup chopped citron or 

yi cup outter. lemon peel. 

About ^ cup milk. 

Sift together the flour, salt and baking powder; rub 
in the butter and then add the sugar, raisins and 
citron. Beat the egg well, and add it with the milk. 
Turn into a well-greased pan, and bake about forty-five 
minutes. 

Honey Cake 

yi cup butter. 2 cups flour. 

}4 cup sugar. 1^ teaspoons Rumford Bak- 

2 eggs. ing Powder. 

1 cup honey. }4 teaspoon salt. 

Beat the butter and sugar till creamy; add the eggs 
well beaten, then the honey, and lastly the flour 
sifted with the baking powder and salt. Bake in a 
loaf-cake pan in a moderate oven about forty minutes. 



Gold Loaf Cake 

}4 cup butter. }^ cup milk. 

1 cup fine granulated IK cups flour. 

sugar. 2 teaspoons Rumford Baking 

7 egg yolks. Powder. 

X teaspoon vanilla flavoring. 

Beat the butter and sugar till creamy; add the 
yolks of eggs beaten till thick and then put in the 
milk. Sift together the flour and baking powder 
twice and add to the other ingredients with the 
flavoring; beat well and pour into a pan with loose 
bottom or removable sides. Bake in a moderate 
oven about three-quarters of an hour. 



CAKE 137 

Nut Cake 

% cup butter. 2)4 cups flour. 

1 cup suear. 2 teaspoons Rumford Baking 

6 egg yolks. Powder. 

K cup milk. yi teaspoon salt. 

1 cup chopped nuts. 1 teaspoon almond extract. 

Beat the butter and sugar to a cream; add the well- 
beaten yolks of the eggs, then the milk, chopped nuts 
and extract. Sift together the flour, baking powder 
and salt and add to the other ingredients. Bake in 
a loaf-cake pan in a moderate oven about forty 
minutes. 

Cornstarch Cake 

% cup butter. \% cups flour. 

1 cup sugar. % teaspoon salt. 

% cup milk. 2 teaspoons Rumford Baking 

% cup cornstarch. Powder. 

6 egg whites. 

Cream the butter and sugar well together; add the 
milk, then the cornstarch and flour sifted with the 
salt and baking powder. Add lastly the whites of the 
eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Bake about forty-five 
minutes in a moderate oven, using rather shallow 
pans. 

Devil Cake 

% cup butter. 1 cup cold water. 

2 cups sugar. 1 square unsweetened choco- 

3 cups sifted flour. late. 

3 level teaspoons Rumford 4 egg whites. 

Baking Powder. 1 teaspoon each vanilla and 
% teaspoon ground cloves. lemon extracts. 

% teaspoon ground nutmeg. 

Cream the butter, add the sugar and beat together 
for five minutes. Sift together flour, baking powder 
and spices and add them to the butter and sugar 
with the water. Melt the chocolate in a cup over 
boiling water and beat into the cake with the flavor- 
ing. Then fold in the whites of the eggs beaten to 



138 BUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

a stiflf froth. Bake in a greased pan in a moderate 
oven from thirty to forty-five minutes. Cover with 
boiled frosting. 

Poor Blan's Cake 

1 cup sugar. 2 teaspoons Rumford Baking 

1 egg. Powder. 

2 tablespoons butter. 1 teaspoon vanilla or other 

1 cup milk. extract. 

2 cups flour. 

Beat the egg and sugar together till light; add the 
milk, then the melted butter and extract. Sift the 
flour and baking powder twice, add the liquid mix- 
ture to them and beat well. Bake about forty-five 
minutes in a moderate oven. 

Pound Cake 

2 cups butter. 4 scant cups pastry flour. 
2 cups granulated sugar. X grated nutmeg. 

10 eggs. X teaspoon salt. 

Beat the butter and sugar till very light and 
creamy; add the well-beaten yolks of eggs. Sift to- 
gether twice the flour, salt and nutmeg and add a 
Uttle at a time. Whip the whites of eggs till very 
stiff and fold them into the cake batter as gently as 
possible. 

Line cake pans with paper, fill two-thirds full with 
the batter, and bake in a moderate oven about one 
and one-half hours. 



Plain Cocoanut Cake 

J4 cup butter. 1 cup cocoanut fresh or 

1 cup sugar. dried. 

2 eggs. }i teaspoon salt. 
}i cup milk. 2 cups flour. 

2 teaspoons Rumford Baking Powder. 

Beat the butter with half the sugar; add the well- 
beaten eggs and remaining sugar^ then the milk and 
cocoanut and, lastly, the flour, salt and baking 
powder sifted together. Beat well, and bake either 



CAKE 139 

as a loaf or layer cake. If fresh-grated cocoanut is 
used a little less milk will probably be required. 

Inexpensive Fruit Cake 

2 cups flour. 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon. 

2 teaspoons Rumford Bak* % cup butter. 

ing Powder. 1 cup sugar. 

X teaspoon ground cloves. 1 cup milk. 

14 teaspoon ground nut- 1 egg. 

meg. }i cup raisins. 

% teaspoon salt. y^ cup currants. 

Sift together the flour, salt, spices and baking 
powder; rub in the butter and add the sugar and 
fruit. Mix to soft dough with the egg and milk, 
and bake in a loaf-cake pan in a moderate oven 
about three-quarters of an hour. 

White Fruit Cake 

1 cup butter. 1 cup milk. 

2 cups sugar. 6 egg whites. 
1 cup grated cocoanut. 3 cups flour. 
IK cup'^ blanched and K teaspoon salt. 

chopped almonds. 2 teaspoons Rumford Baking 

K cup mixed candied peel, Powder, 

cut small. 

Beat the butter and sugar to a cream; add the 
cocoanut, almonds and peel, and then the milk. Beat 
the whites of the eggs to a stiflf froth and add with 
the flour, salt and baking powder sifted together, 
folding them in as gently as possible. Bake in loaf- 
cake pans in a steady oven about forty-five minutes. 



Rich Fruit Cake 

li pound butter. K c^P molasses. 

1 pound brown sugar. ' y% ounce cloves. 

8 eggs. % ounce cinnamon. 

2 pounds raisins. X ounce mace. 
2 pounds currants. 4 cups flour. 

1 pound citron chopped 1 wineglass sherrv. 

very fine. 1 wineglass brandy. 

Beat the butter and sugar till light and creamy; 
add the eggs thoroughly beaten, then the raisins 



140 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

(seeded) and currants well washed and dried. Chop 
the citron — or pass it through a meat chopper — 
and add to the other ingredients with the molasses 
and ground spices. Sift and add the flour and, 
lastly, stir in the sherry and brandy. Bake in cake 
pans lined with two thicknesses of greased paper to 
protect the cake from too great heat. Bake very 
slowly about four hours. 

Wedding Fruit Cake 

1 pound citron. 6 eggs. 

1 pound candied apricots. 1 pound flour. 

1 pound candied pineapple. 1 teaspoon Rumford Baking 
1 pound candied cherries. Powder. 

3 pounds seeded raisins. 2 teaspoons cinnamon. 

ly^ pounds currants. j^ teaspoon cloves. 

}i pound butter. 1 nutmeg. 

}^ pound brown sugar. K teaspoon salt. 
}4 cup brandy. 

Cut the citron, apricots and pineapple in large 
pieces, leaving the cherries whole. Seed the raisins, 
and wash and dry the currants. Cream the butter 
and sugar, add the yolks of eggs well beaten, then 
the fruit, also the flour, salt, baking powder and 
spices sifted together; put in the brandy and mix 
all thoroughly. Last of all add the stiflly-beaten 
whites of the eggs. Turn into greased cake pans and 
steam five hours; afterwards bake very slowly for 
one hour to slightly dry the cake. 



Yorkshire Parkin 

1}4 cups flour. f< cup sugar. 

2 cups oatmeal. 2 teaspoons Rumford Baking 

1 cup molasses. Powder. 

1 egg. 1 teaspoon soda. 

y^ cup butter. 1 teaspoon ground ginger. 

}^ cup milk. 

Sift together the flour, baking powder and ginger, 
and then add the sugar and oatmeal. Heat the but- 
ter and molasses to the boiling point, add to the 
dry ingredients with the egg and milk, add also the 



CAKE 141 

soda dissolved in a tablespoon of hot water. Beat 
well, turn into a well-greased, shallow pan and bake 
slowly about one and one-half hours. 



Scotch Shortbread 

3 cups flour. 1 cup sugar. 

2 cups butter. 1 ounce blanched almonds. 

Sift the flour twice and rub in the butter with the 
hands; add the sugar and knead and mix, either on 
a board or in a bowl, till a dough is formed. Do not 
add either egg or milk, as the butter softens from the 
mixing and will bind the ingredients together. Roll 
the dough rather thinly, cut into rounds or ovals and 
press a few almonds into each. Place on a flat baking- 
pan, and bake in a slow oven till golden brown. 



Quick German Coffee Cake 

2yi cups sifted flour. 1 egg. 

1 teas|>oon salt. 1>^ cups milk. 

2 heaping teaspoons Rum- Melted butter. 

ford Baking Powder. Cinnamon and sugar to 
2 tablespoons sugar. sprinkle over the top. 

Sift together the flour, salt and baking powder; 
add the sugar and mix all to a soft dough with the 
beaten egg and milk. Beat well and turn into a 
greased biscuit pan; spread evenly, brush over with 
melted butter and sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar. 
Bake in a moderate oven about twenty-five minutes. 



German Apple Cake 

2 cups flour. 3 tablespoons butter. 

}i teaspoon salt. 1 egg. 

2 level teaspoons Rumford About 1 cup milk. 
Baking Powder. Apples. 

Sugar. 

Sift together the flour, salt and baking powder; 
rub in the butter and mix to a light dough with the 
beaten egg and milk. Roll out about half an inch 



142 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

thick and lay on a greased, shallow baking-pan. 
Pare and core the apples, cut into eighths, lay the 
pieces on the dough and sprinkle with sugar to taste. 
Bake about half an hour in a moderate oven, and 
serve hot with whipped cream. 

Plain Sponge Cake 

3 eggs. 1 teaspoon Rumford Baking 
1 cup sugar. Powder. 

yi cup hot water. yi teaspoon salt. 

1 cup sifted flour. Grated rind of half a lemon. 

Beat the eggs, with half the sugar, till they thicken; 
add the water and remainder of the sugar, and beat 
again. Put in the grated lemon rind, then the flour 
sifted with the salt and baking powder, folding these 
in as gently as possible. Bake about thirty minutes 
in a shallow pan that has been greased and floured. 

Old-fashioned Sponge Cake 

10 eggs. lyi cups flour. 

2 cups flne granulated 1 teaspoon of any desired 

sugar. flavoring. 

Separate the whites from the yolks of the eggs and 
beat the yolks with the sugar till they are thick and 
ropy. Next, beat the whites till stifiE and add them 
with the flavoring. As soon as mixed fold in the 
flour very gently, mixing just enough to blend it 
with the other ingredients. Butter a deep cake pan 
and sprinkle with flour, shaking off all that does not 
cling to the pan. Pour the cake batter into the pan, 
filling it not more than two-thirds, and bake in a 
moderately quick oven about three-quarters of an 
hour. 

Haeapple Cake 

5 eggs. X pound glao^ pineapple. 

1 cup pulverized sugar. 1 cup pastry flour. 

Put the eggs and sugar into a large bowl and beat 
till very thick. Sift the flour twice and add it to 
the eggs and sugar. Cut the fruit into shreds, toss 



CAKE 143 

in flour to keep them separate, and add to the cake; 
mix lightly and pour into a shallow pan lined with 
greased paper. Bake from twenty minutes to half 
an hour in a moderately hot oven. Frost when cold, 
if desired. 

JeUy Roll 

3 eggs. 1 cup flour. 

1 cup sugar. 1 teaspoon Rumford Baking 

3 tablespoons cold water. Powder. 

}i teaspoon salt. 

Beat the eggs and sugar till quite thick; add the 
water, then the flour, salt and baking powder sifted 
together twice. Line a shallow pan with greased 
paper, pour in the batter evenly, and bake in a quick 
ov^n about twelve minutes. Turn out onto a cloth 
or paper sprinkled with sugar, tear off the paper and 
spread with jam or jelly. Roll up quickly. 

Eggless Cake 

}4' cup butter. 2 teaspoons Rumford Baking 
\j4 cups sugar. Powder. 

1 cup milk. 1 cup currants or raisins. 
3 cups flour. }i teaspoon mixed spices. 

^ teaspoon salt. 

Beat the butter and sugar till light and creamy; 
add the milk, then the fruit and, lastly, the flour, 
salt, baking powder and spices sifted together. Turn 
into a greased pan and bake in a slow oven about 
one hour. 

Orange-Cocoanut Cake 

2 cups sugar. Juice and grated rind of 
1 cup butter. 1 orange. 

3 egg whites. 2 cups flour. 
5 yolks. K cup water. 

lyi teaspoons Rumford Baking Powder. 

Beat the butter and sugar to a cream; add the 
yolks of eggs and water, then the juice and rind of 
the orange; next, the flour and baking powder sifted 
together, and fold in very gently the stiflly-beaten 



144 BUMPORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

whites of the eggs. Bake twenty minutes In a hot 
oven in layer-cake pans, and put the layers together 
with Orange and Cocoanut Filling. 

Plain Loaf Cake 

3^ cup butter. 1 teaspoon lemon or 

1 cup sugar. vanilla extract 

2 eggs. 2 cups flour. 

H cup milk. 2 level teaspoons Rumford 

Baking Powder. 

Beat the butter and sugar till light and creamy; add 
the well-beaten eggs, then the milk and flavoring extract, 
and, lastly, the flour and baking powder sifted together. 
Beat well, and bake in a loaf-cake pan about forty-five 
minutes. 

Lily Cake 

J^ cup butter. 2>^ teaspoons Rumfor4 Bak« 

1 cup sugar. ing Powder. 

% cup milk. % teaspoon lemon extract. 

\% cups flour. ^ teaspoon vanilla extract. 

3 egg whites. 

Cream the butter gradually and add the sugar; 
next, the milk and flavorings, then the flour sifted 
with the baking powder and beat well. Add the 
whites of the eggs whipped to a sti£E froth and bake 
in layers twenty minutes. Fill with Prune Almond 
Filling. 

Lady Baltimore Cake 

\yi cups fine granulated Z cups flour. 

sugar. 2 teaspoons Rumford Baking 
1 scant cup butter. Powder. 

1 cup milk. 6 egg whites. 

Beat the butter and sugar till very light and 
creamy; add the milk alternately with the flour with 
which the baking powder has been sifted,. Beat 
thoroughly, and add the stiflly-beaten whites of the 
eggs. Bake about forty minutes in two lightly- 
greased pans, and fill with Lady Baltimore Filling. 



CAKE 145 

Fig Layer Cake 

J^ cup butter. % cup finely-chopped figs. 

1 cup sugar. 2 cups flour. 

1 egg. y^ teaspoon salt. 

1 cup milk. 2 teaspoons Rumford Baking 

Powder. 

Beat the butter and sugar till creamy; add the 
beaten egg and milk, then the figs and, lastly, the 
flour, salt and baking powder sifted together. Bake 
in layers about twenty minutes, and fill with Fig 
Filling. 

Cofiee Layer Cake 

yi cup butter. 2 cups flour. 

1 cup brown sugar % teaspoon mixed spices. 

2 eggs. X teaspoon salt. 

X cup molasses. 2 teaspoons Rumford Baking 

yi cup made coffee. Powder. 

Beat the butter and sugar till creamy; add the 
6ggs, then the molasses and coffee and, lastly, the 
flour, salt, spices and baking powder sifted together. 
Bake in layers about twenty minutes, and put to- 
gether with frosting. 



Marshmallow Cake 

1 cup sugar. 2% cups flour. 

yi cup butter. 2 teaspoons Rumford Baking 

2 eggs. Powder. 

1 cup milk. yi teaspoon salt. 

1 teaspoon vanilla extract. 

Beat the butter and sugar to a cream; add the 
yolks of the eggs well beaten, the milk, and then 
the flouTy salt and baking powder sifted together 
twice. Next, put in the vanilla and beat the cake 
well; then fold in gently the whites of the eggs whipped 
to a stiff froth. Bake in two layer-cake pans about 
twenty minutes, and put together with Marshmallow 
Filling. 



146 EUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

White Layer Cake 

yi cup butter. 1 teaspoon Rumford Baking 

\yi cups sugar. Powder. 

yi cup milk. >3 teaspoon salt. 

\}i cups flour. 1 teaspoon flavoring extract* 

4 egg whites. 

Beat tho butter and sugar to a cream; add the 
milk and flavoring, then the flour, salt and baking 
powder sifted together. Beat very thoroughly, and 
then fold in very gently the stiffly-beaten whites of 
the eggs. Bake about twenty minutes in layer-cake 
pans, putting the layers together with any desired 
filling. 

Layer Cake No. 1 

yi cup butter. 3 cups flour. 

2 cups sugar. 2 teaspoons Rumford Baking 

4 eggs. Powder. 

1 cup cold water. yi teaspoon salt. 

1 teaspoon vanilla. 

Beat the butter and sugar till creamy; add the 
yolks of the eggs well beaten, then the water and 
flavoring and, next, the flour, salt and baking pow- 
der sifted together. Beat the whites of the eggs to 
a stiff froth and add them last. Bake about twenty 
minutes in layer-cake pans, and put together with 
any desired filling. 

Layer Cake No. 2 

2 eggs. % teaspoon salt. 

1 cup sugar. 2 teaspoons Rumford Baking 
yi cup water or milk. Powder. 

2 cups flour. 1 teaspoon flavoring extract 

Beat the eggs and sugar till light and frothy; add 
the water or milk, then the flour, salt and baking 
powder which have been sifted together twice. Add 
the flavoring and bakei about twenty minutes in 
greased layer-cake pans, and put together with any 
desired filling: 

This cake dries more quickly than one in which 
butter is used. 



CAKE 147 

Date Lunch Cake 

}i cup butter. 3 cups flour. 

1 cup sugar. }4 teaspoon salt. 

2 eggs. 2 teaspoons Rumford Baking 
1 cup milk. Powder. 

\y^ cups dates, stoned and cut in pieces. 

Beat the butter and sugar till light; add the eggs 
well beaten, then the dates, milk and, lastly, the 
flour, salt and baking powder sifted together. Beat 
well, and bake in a shallow, greased pan in a quick 
oven. Cut in squares before serving. 

English Walnut Cake 

yi cup butter. 1 level teaspoon cinnamon. 

1 cup sifted powdered % teaspoon cloves. 

sugar. }i teaspoon nutmeg. 

6 egg yolks. 1 cup English walnuts, 

2 level tablespoons sifted finely chopped. 

cocoa. 1 cup soft bread crumbs. 

2 teaspoons Rumford Baking Powder. 

Cream the butter, add the sugar, and the yolks 
of the eggs well beaten, then the cocoa and ground 
spices sifted together; put in next the walnuts, and 
beat all thoroughly. Stir in the bread crumbs with 
which the baking powder has been mixed, and fold 
in lightly the whites of the eggs beaten till stiff and 
dry. Bake at once in layer-cake pans, and put the 
layers together with Orange Walnut Filling. 



Layers for Mocha Cake 

K cup butter. 2}4 cups flour. 

2 cups sugar. yi teaspoon salt. 

K cup milk. 2 teaspoons Rumford Baking 

1 teaspoon vanilla extract. Powder. 

6 egg whites. 

Beat the butter and sugar to a cream; add the milk 
and vanilla, then the flour, salt and baking powder 
sifted together and, lastly, fold in very gently the 



148 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

whites of the eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Bake ii^ 
layer-cake pans, and fill with Mocha Filling. 

Queen Cakes 

1 cup butter. 3 cups flour. 

2 cups sugar. yi teaspoon salt. 

4 eggs. 2 teaspoons Rumford Baking 

1 cup seeded raisins. Powder. 

1 cup milk. 

Beat the butter and sugar to a cream; add the 
yolks of the eggs well beaten, the fruit and milk, and 
then the flour with which the salt and baking powder 
have been sifted. Lastly, fold in gently the whites 
of the eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Bake in a hot 
oven in well-greased fancy pans about twelve minutes. 



Lady Fingers 

2 egg yolks. yi cup pastry flour. 

3 egg whites. y^ teaspoon salt. 

]/^ cup powdered sugar. y^ teaspoon vanilla extract. 

Beat the whites of the eggs till very stiff, adding 
the sugar gradually. Then add the well-beaten yolks 
and the vanilla; fold in very gently the flour sifted 
with the salt. Force the mixture through a pastry 
bag onto a greased, flat pan; sprinkle well with sifted 
sugar, and fake eight minutes in a moderate oven. 

New Year's Cakes 

1 quart flour. 1 cup butter. 

1 teaspoon salt. 2 cups sugar. 

3 teaspoons Rumford Bak- 1 tablespoon caraway seeds, 
ing Powder. 1 egg. 

IK c^ps milk. 

Sift together the flour, salt and baking powder; rub 
in the butter with the fingers, then add the sugar and 
seeds and mix to a light dough with the egg, and the 
milk slightly warmed. Knead till smooth, roll thinly 
and cut into any desired shape. Bake on flat tins in 
a hot oven about fifteen minutes. 



CAKE 149 

Queen Eclairs 

^ cup water. 3 eggs. 

1 tablespoon butter. 1 teaspoon Rumford Baking 
f< cup nour. Powder. 

fi teaspoon salt. 

Put the water and butter into a saucepan and 
allow them to boil; stir in the flour and salt and cook 
till the mixture forms a stiff paste and leaves the 
sides of the saucepan clean. Cool slightly, and beat 
in the eggs one at a time. Add the baking powder 
last, and force the mixture through a pastry bag onto 
flat, greased pans, in pieces about the width of two 
fingers and length of one. Bake slowly till quite 
light. Cool, make an incision in the side of each 
eclair and fill with whipped cream or custard. They 
may be iced, if desired, with Chocolate or Coffee 
Frosting. 

Jairy Cones 

6 egg yolks. 1 cup chopped English wal- 

3 tablespoons sugar. nut meats. 

2 tablespoons flour. Whipped cream, sweetened 

and flavored. 

Beat the yolks of the eggs with the sugar; add the 
flotir, then the nuts and spread as thinly as possible 
on greased, flat baking-tins. Bake about seven 
minutes, and while still warm cut into squares and roll 
each in the form of a cone. When wanted for use 
fill with the sweetened and flavored whipped cream. 

Cream Puffs 

1 cup boiling water. ly^ cups flour. 

}i teaspoon salt. 4 eggs. 

14 cup butter. Whipped cream or custard. 

Bring the water, salt and butter together to boil- 
ing point; stir in the flour and cook till the mixture 
leaves the sides of the saucepan clean. When cooled, 
add the eggs one at a time, beating each one in 
thoroughly; drop by tablespoonfuls some distance 
apart on greased baking-pans, and bake half an hour 
in a steady oven. When cold, split and fill with 
sweetened cream or thick custard. 



150 BUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

Pecan Sticks 

% cup butter. \}4 cups flour. 

^ cup sugar. }4 teaspoon salt. 

2 eggs. 1}4 teaspoons Rumford Bak« 

}4 cup milk. ing Powder. 

1 cup shelled pecan nuts. 

Beat the butter and sugar to a cream; add the 
eggs well beaten, the milk and nuts, and then the 
flour, salt and baking powder sifted together. Beat 
thoroughly, and bake in greased finger-roll pans. 
When cold, cover the tops with a white frosting into 
which a few extra nuts have been stirred. 



Moon Cakes 

K cup butter. }4 teaspoon ^alt. 

j4 cup sugar. \}4 cups flour. 

2 eggs. 1 teaspoon Rumford Baking 
j4 cup blanched and Powder, 

chopped almonds. 

Beat the butter and sugar to a cream; add the well- 
beaten eggs, then the almonds and, lastly, the flour, 
salt and baking powder sifted together. Bake in a 
hot oven in lightly-greased, crescent-shaped pans. 
Frost, if desired. 

Rollemups 

2 cups flour. 1 cup milk. 

14 teaspoon salt. X cup maple sugar, or 

2 teaspoons Rumford Bak- }i cup brown sugar and 

ing Powder. }i teaspoon ground cin- 

2 tablespoons butter. namon. 

1 egg- 
Sift together the flour, salt and baking powder; rub 
in the butter, add the sugar and mix to a soft dough 
with the egg and milk. Roll half an inch thick on a 
floured board, sprinkle with the maple sugar — or 
brown sugar and cinnamon — and roll into a long roll. 
Press the edges closely together and cut into three- 
fourths inch slices with a sharp knife and lay cut side 
down on a greased pan. Bake about twenty minutes 
in a quick oven. 



M£MORA]!n>A 



MEMORAIIDA 



CAKE FILLINGS, FROSTINGS AND ICINGS 

Fig FiUing 

1 pound figs. 2 tablespoons sugar. 

1 cup water. Juice of 1 lemon. 

Pass the figs through the medium cutter of a meat 
chopper, add the water and sugar, and cook till they 
form a thick pulp. Add the lemon juice, beat well 
and, when cool, spread between the layers of cake. 



Almond Filling 

3 egg yolks. ^ cup almonds, or 

2 cups confectioners* sugar. }4 cup almond paste. 
1 teaspoon coffee extract. 

Beat the yolks of the eggs till thick, add the sugar 
thoroughly sifted, then the almonds passed through 
the finest knives of a meat chopper, or, better still, 
use almond paste. Flavor with the coffee extract, 
and spread between layers of cake. 



Maple Filling 

1 cup thin cream. 2 cups scraped maple sugar. 

y^ cup chopped nuts. 

Cook the cream and maple sugar slowly till they 
thicken; remove from the fire, add the nuts, and beat 
till creamy before filling the cake. 



Orange and Walnut Filling 

14 pound English walnuts. Juice and pulp of 1 orange. 
1 cup powdered sugar. 

Shell the nuts, reserving a few unbroken halves for 
the top of the cake. Put the orange pulp and juice 

153 



154 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

into a bowl, add the sugar, cook three minutes, cool, 
and then beat till it thickens; add the chopped nuts 
and spread between layers of cake. Frost the top 
with Plain Orange Icing, and decorate with the halves 
of nuts. 

Orange and Cocoanut Filling 

1 egg. 1 cup crated cocoanut. 

1 cup whipped cream. Grated rind of 1 orange. 

X cup powdered sugar. Juice of 1 orange. 

Beat the egg until light, add the whipped cream 
and sugar, then the orange rind, cocoanut and orange 
juice. Spread between and on top of layers of cake. 



Portsmouth Orange Filling 

1 cube cut sugar. 2 tablespoons water. 

1 orange. About 2 cups confectioners' 

Juice of 1 lemon. sugar. 

Rub the sugar over the rind of the orange, then 
dissolve the sugar with the juice of the lemon and 
water, and strain; add the confectioners' sugar, using 
enough to make a thick icing. Spread the icing 
between the layers of cake and imbed in it very thin 
slices of orange, skinned and seeded. Cover with 
more of the icing, and decorate with sections of 
tangerine or glac6 oranges. 



Lady Baltimore Filling 

2 cups granulated sugar. 2 egg whites. 

1 cup water. 1 cup chopped raisins, 

1 cup chopped nuts. 

Boil the sugar and water five minutes, pour the 
boiling syrup over the whites of the eggs which have 
been beaten till stiff, and set aside half of the mixture 
for the frostiiig. Add the raisins and nuts to the 
remainder and use for the filling. 



CAKE FILLINGS, PROSTTNGS AND ICINGS 156 

Mocha FUling axid Frostiiig 

6 tablespoons butter. 4 tablespoons dry cocoa. 

2 cups confectioners* 3 tablespoons liquid coffee, 

sugar. I teaspoon vanilla extract. 

Beat the butter to a cream, adding, one cup of the 
sugar; then sift and add the cocoa. Beat well, put 
in the coffee and remaining sugar, and then the 
vanilla. Spread between and on top of layers of 
cake. 

Caramel Nut Filling 

1 cup thin cream. 1 cup brown sugar. 

1 cup nuts, coarsely chopped. 

Cook the cream and sugar slowly till they begin to 
thicken. Remove from the fire, stir until creamy, 
add the nuts and spread between layers of cake. 



Marslunallow Filling 

^ cup sugar. yi pound marshmallows. 

yi cup muk. 2 tablespoons boiling water. 

1 teaspoon vanilla. 

Put the sugar and milk into a saucepan, bring to 
the boiling point and boil six minutes without stir- 
ring. Melt the marshmallows in a double boiler, add 
the boiling water and cook till smooth; then add the 
hot 83a*up, beating while adding. Add the vanilla 
and beat till cool enough to spread. Use for both 
filling and frosting. 

Prune Almond Filling 

1 cup sugar. 1 egg white. 

yi cup boiling water. 14 cup prunes. 

yi cup blanched almonds. 

Boil the sugar and water together, without stirring, 
till a little lifted on a spoon forms a thread, and pour 
this over the beaten white of the egg, beating while 
adding. Add the prunes which have been cooked till 
softy stoned and cut in pieces; also the almonds. 



156 BUMFOBD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

blanched and chopped. When cold spread between 
layers of cake. 

Chocolate Ftosting 

2 squares chocolate. 3 tablespoons boiling 

6 tablespoons confec- water, 

tioners' sugar. 

Melt the chocolate in a double boiler, add the sugar 
and water and cook gently till smooth. Cool, and 
spread on cake. 



Lemon Frosting 

Juice of 2 lemons. About 2^ cups powdered 

sugar. 

Strain the juice of the lemons into a bowl and add 
the sugar, finely sifted, imtil thick enough to spread. 
The exact quantity of sugar will depend on the size 
of the lemons. Pour over the top of the cake, and 
spread and smooth with a thin-bladed knife that has 
been dipped in water. 

Boiled Frosting 

1 cup granulated sugar. 1 egg white. 

yi cup hot water. % teaspoon cream of tartar. 

1 teaspoon flavoring. 

Boil the sugar and water together, without stirring, 
till they form a thread when a little is lifted from the 
pan; beat the white of the egg, add the cream of 
tartar and pour the hot syrup over them, beating 
while doing so. Add the flavoring, aiid beat till thick 
enough to spread. 

Plain Orange Icing 

Grated rind and strained About \}i cups powdered 
juice of 1 orange. sugar. 

Put the rind and juice of the orange into a bowl, 
add the sugar (sifted) till the mixture is thick enough 



CAKE FILLINGS, FROSTINGS AND ICINGS 157 

to spread. Beat well and pour over the cake. 
Smooth with a thin-bladed knife that has been dipped 
in water. 



Cofiee Icing 

% cup strong, clear coffee. 2 cups granulated sugar. 
2 teaspoons vanilla extract. 

Cook the coffee and sugar together till a little 
dropped in cold water forms a soft ball. Cool, add 
the vanilla, and beat till stiff enough to spread. 



Opera Caramel Icing 

\yi cups brown sugar. 1 tablespoon butter. 

K cup thin cream or milk. Flavoring. 

Put the sugar, cream (or milk) and butter into a 
saucepan and cook gently till a little dropped in cold 
water forms a soft ball. Remove from the fire, cool, 
add the flavoring, and beat till thick enough to spread. 



Fondant Icing 

2 cups granulated sugar. 1 cup boiling water. 

Flavoring. 

Put the sugar and water together in a saucepan 
and stir till the sugar is dissolved. Then put over 
the fire and cook, without stirring or shaking, till a 
little dropped in cold water forms a soft ball. Re- 
move at once from the fire and cool, still without 
stirring as this would cause the sugar to grain. 
When cool add the flavoring, beat till creamy, then 
knead with the hands till very smooth. This creamy 
fondant is better if allowed to stand a few days 
before using, and will keep indefinitely if covered 
with a damp cloth or waxed paper. When required 



158 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

for use put the desired quantity in a bowl over hot 
water, and melt till soft enough to spread. 



Bflilk Frosting 

IH cups sugar. K cup milk. 

1 teaspoon butter. >^ teaspoon vanilla. 

Melt the butter in a saucepan, then add sugar and 
milk. Boil gently, without stirring, for thirteen min- 
utes. Beat until stifif enough to spread; then add 
flavoring, and spread over cake. 



MEMORAHI^ 



MEHORAIIDA 



GINGERBREAD, COOKIES, DOUGH- 
NUTS, ETC. 

Dark Gingerbread 

K cup butter. 2 cups flour. 

1 cup molasses. y^ teaspoon salt. 

1 egg. 2 teaspoons ground ginger. 

2 tablespoons milk. 2 teaspoons Kumford Baking 

Powder. 

Heat the butter till hissing, pour it into a bowl in 
which the molasses has already been measured, add 
the egg and milk, and mix lightly. Sift together the 
flour, salt, ginger and baking powder, and stir in the 
liquid ingredients, beating and stirring only enough 
to blend. As soon as smoothly blended pour into 
two shallow, well-greased pans, and bake twenty 
minutes in a moderately hot oven. 

Soft Gingerbread 

1 cup New Orleans % teaspoon ground cinna- 

mclasses. mon. 

1 cup sugar. 1 cup water. 

% cup butter, melted. 4 cups flour. 

1 teaspoon ground ginger. % teaspoon salt. 
1 teaspoon soda. 

Stir the molasses, sugar and butter together; add 
the water, then the flour, salt, soda and spices sifted 
together, and beat hard. Bake in two well-greased 
pans in a moderate oven about half an hour. 

Fruit Gingerbread 

y^ cup butter. 2 teaspoons Rumford Baking 

1 cup sugar. Powder. 

2 eggs. 1 cup seeded raisins. 

1 cup molasses. y^ cup chopped lemon or 

3 cups flour. orange peel. 

Xyi teaspoons ginger. % cup milk or cold coffee. 

Beat the butter and sugar till light and creamy; 
add the beaten yolks of the eggs, then the raisins, peel, 

161 



162 RUMFOBD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

molasses and coflfee, also the flour with which the gin- 
ger and baking powder have been sifted. Then add 
the whites of the eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Bake 
in well-greased pans in a moderate oven. 



Dropped Cookies 

X cup butter. f< cup currants. 

1 cup sugar. 3 cups flour. 

2 eggs. 2 teaspoons Rumford Baking 
]4 cup milk. Powder. 

% cup molasses. 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon. 

% teaspoon ground cloves. 

Beat the butter and sugar to a cream; add the well- 
beaten eggs, then the milk, molasses and currants 
and, lastly, the dry ingredients well sifted together. 
Drop by spoonfuls on greased pans, some distance 
apart. Bake about ten minutes in a moderate oven. 



Seed Cookies 

1 cup butter. 3 cups flour. 

2 cups sugar. % teaspoon salt. 

2 eggs. 2 teaspoons Rumford Baking 

% cup water. Powder. 

2 tablespoons caraway seeds. 

Cream the butter and sugar together; add the well- 
beaten eggs and water. Sift together and add the 
flour, salt and baking powder, and then the seeds. 
Turn onto a well-floured board, roll out thinly, cut 
into rounds and lay on greased, flat pans. Bake 
about ten minutes in a moderate oven. 



Chocolate Cookies 

% cup butter. X cup milk. 

1 cup sugar. 2 cups flour. 

1 egg. Yi teaspoon salt. 

2 squares chocolate, \% teaspoons Rumford Bak- 

melted ing Powder. 

Beat the butter and sugar to a cream; add the egg, 
then the melted chocolate and milk. Sift together 



GINGERBREAD, COOKIES, DOUGHNUTS, ETC. 163 

the flour, salt and baking powder and add to the 
other ingredients. Roll out thinly, cut into rounds 
and bake on greased pans in a hot oven. 



Sugar Cakes 

% cup butter. 1 cup sugar. 

1 cup flour. 2 egg whites. 



Rub the butter into the flour and add the sugar, 
reserving a little to sprinkle over the tops of the 
cakes. Beat the whites of the eggs lightly and use 
them to mix the dry ingredients to a dough; roll out 
thinly and cut into small cakes. Sprinkle with the 
sugar reserved for the purpose, and bake on greased 
tins, in a moderate oven, till golden brown. 



Jumbles 

% cup butter. 1 cup flour. 

y^ cup sugar. y^ teaspoon salt. 

1 egg. 1 teaspoon Rumford Baking 

Grated rind of half a lemon. Powder. 

Beat the butter and sugar to a cream; add the egg 
previously beaten, the lemon rind, and then the 
flour, salt and baking powder sifted together. Drop 
by spoonfuls on a greased pan and bake about ten 
minutes. 



Crullers 

y2 cup butter. About 3 cups flour. 

1 cup sugar. % teaspoon salt. 

2 eggs. 3 teaspoons Rumford Baking 
1 cup milk. Powder. 

% teaspoon grated nutmeg. 

Beat the butter and sugar together; add the beaten 
eggs and milk, then the flour, salt, baking powder and 



164 KUMFOBD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

nutmeg sifted together. Roll out, cut, and fry golden 
brown in deep fat. Drain, and sprinkle with sugar. 



German Crullers 

2 eggs. % teaspoon cinnamon or 
1 cup milk. nutmeg. 

1 tablespoon melted butter, yi teaspoon salt. 

3 cups flour. 1 cup sugar. 

2 teaspoons Rumford Baking Powder. 

Beat the eggs till light and mix th^n with the milk 
and butter. Sift together the flour, salt, spice and 
baking powder; add the sugar and blend the two 
mixtures. Roll out, cut into rings and fry in hot fat 
till golden brown. Drain well and dust with sugar. 



Sponge Drops 

3 eggs. ]^ teaspoon salt. 

1^ cup sugar. 1 teaspoon Rumford Baking 

1 cup flour. Powder. 

Beat the eggs till very light; add the sugar and beat 
again; fold in gently the flour, salt and baking powder 
sifted together. Drop by teaspoonfuls on greased 
pans, some distance apart. Bake in a hot oven till 
set. 



Cinnamon Crisps 

K cup butter. 1>^ cups flour. 

Vi cup sugar. 1 teaspoon Rumford Baking 

1 teaspoon cinnamon. Powder. 

% cup milk. 

Beat the butter and sugar, and when light and 
creamy add the cinnamon, flour and baking powder 
sifted together. Use just enough milk to make a 
dough that can be easily rolled out. Roll very thin 



GINGERBBEAD, COOKIES, DOUGHNUTS, ETC. 165 

on a well-floured board and cut into squares or 
rounds. Bake on greased pans, in a moderate oven, 
about ten minutes. 



Oatmeal Crisps 

X cup butter. yi cup sugar. 

K cup flour. % cup oatmeal or rolled 



yi teaspoon salt. oats 

1 teaspoon Rumford Bak- 1 small pgg. 

ing Powder. A little milk, if needed. 



Sift together the flour, salt and baking powder; 
rub in the butter, add the sugar and oatmeal and 
mix to a rather stiff dough with the egg, adding milk 
if necessary. Roll out on a floured board, cut into 
rounds, and bake about twelve minutes in a moder- 
ately hot oven. 



Whole Wheat Crisps 

X cup sugar. 1 teaspoon Rumford Baking 

2 cups whole wheat flour. Powder. 

K teaspoon salt. 1 cup thin cream. 

Sift the flour, salt and baking powder; add the 
sugar and mix to a stiff dough with the cream; roll 
very thin and cut out with a biscuit cutter. Bake 
on greased tins in a hot oven. 

Brandy Wafers 

1 cup molasses. 1 cup flour. 

% cup butter. % cup sugar. 

1 teaspoon ground ginger. 

Melt the molasses and butter; add the sugar, then 
the flour and ginger sifted together. Mix well and 
drop by spoonfuls on well-greased tins, some distance 
apart. Bake in a moderate oven about ten minutes. 
Remove from the pans before they become too 
cool. 



166 BT7MF0RD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

Micnons 

yi cup butter. 1 teaspoon Rumford Baking 
14 cup sugar. Powder. 

3 egg yolks. }4 teaspoon ground cinna- 
X cup blanched almonds, mon. 

pounded fine. }4 teaspoon vanilla extract. 

IK cups sifted flour. A little milk, if necessary. 

Cream the butter and sugar; add the well-beatea 
yolks of the eggs, then the almonds and vanilla. Sift 
together the flour, baking powder and cinnamon, and 
add to the first mixture, with milk if needed, and 
make a stiff dough. Knead slightly and roll one- 
fourth inch thick. Cut with a fancy cutter, brush 
over with beaten white of egg, and sprinkle with 
granulated sugar and chopped almonds. Bake on 
greased pans in a quick oven. 



Romford Doughnuts 

1 quart flour. % teaspoon ground nutmeg 
% teaspoon salt. or cinnamon. 

2 teaspoons Rumford Bak- J4 cup sugar 

ing Powder. 2 eggs. 

About 1}4 cups milk. 

Sift together the flour, salt, baking powder and 
spice; add the sugar and mix to a soft dough with the 
eggs and milk. Cut out, fry in deep fat, drain, and 
sprinkle with sugar. 



Puff Ball Doughnuts 

3 eggs. }4 teaspoon nutmeg. 

1 cup su^ar. About 1 quart flour. 

1 pint milk. 2 teaspoons Rumford Baking 

14 teaspoon salt. Powder. 

Frying fat. 

Beat the eggs and sugar till quite light, and add 
the milk, salt and nutmeg; sift the baking powder 
with two cups of the flour and add, beating well. 
Sift and add more flour till a thick, heavy batter is 
the result. Drop by spoonfuls into hot fat and cook 



GINGEBBBEAD, COOKIES, DOUGHNUTS, ETC. 167 

about three minutes, turning twice that all sides may 
be evenly browned. Drain very thoroughly on 
unglazed paper. 



Sye Drop Cakes 

1 cup rye flour. K cup milk. 

1}4 teaspoons Rumford ^ cup white flour. 

Baking Powder. 1 ege. 

1 tablespoon sugar. Pinch of salt. 

Sift all dry ingredients together and make a rather 
thick batter with the egg and milk. Dip a spoon into 
hot fat and take up the batter with it; drop by spoon- 
fuls into deep fat and cook slowly about six minutes. 
The fat must not be as hot as for doughnuts or the 
cakes will brown before being thoroughly cooked 
through. 

Wonders 

1 egg, ^ teaspoon salt. 

About H cup flour. 

Beat the egg, add salt and enough flour to make a 
stiff dough — about three-fourths cup will usually be 
sufficient. Roll out on a floured board till as thin as 
a wafer, and cut with a large round cutter. Drop sepa- 
rately into hot fat, fry golden brown, drain well and 
dust with powdered sugar. 



Macaroons 

yi pound almond paste. ^ cup powdered sugar. 

Whites of 4 large eggs. 

Break up the almond paste with a fork, add the 
powdered sugar and mix till the paste is pulverized. 
Beat the whites of the eggs thoroughly and mix with 
the almond paste and sugar. Drop by teaspoonfuls 
on greased paper spread on baking pans, and bake 
about twenty minutes in a moderate oven. 



168 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

German Uacaroons 

K pound brown sugar. 3 egg whites. 

% pound ground almonds. Juice of half a lemon. 
Wafer paper. 

Put the whites of eggs in a bowl, and stir in the 
sugar slowly; strain and add the lemon juice, and 
put in the almonds, a little at a time. Mix smoothly 
and drop by teaspoonfuls about two inches apart on 
the wafer paper which has been laid on baking-tins. 
Bake in a very slow oven till golden brown. 

Oatmeal Macaroons 

1 tablespoon butter. 2^ cups rolled oats. 

1 cup granulated sugar. 1 teaspoon Rumford Baking 

2 eggs. Powder. ' 

% teaspoon salt. 

Soften the butter slightly, add the sugar, then the 
beaten eggs, next the oats, baking powder and salt 
mixed together. Drop by spoonfuls on greased pans, 
and bake about twelve minutes in a hot oven. 



MEMORAUDA 



MEMORANDA 



ICE CREAM AND ICES 

GEIVERAL DIRECTIONS FOR FREEZING 

TO insure good frozen desserts it is necessary to use 
the best ingredients, the ice and salt in the right 
proportions and to freeze at the proper rate of speed. 

Always boil sugar and water together to a syrup for 
water ices, as this melts the sugar thoroughly and 
gives body to the ices. 

When cream is the foimdation for the dessert, 
scald it, and add the sugar to the scalding cream. 

When a custard is used as the base of the frozen 
mixture, cook eggs and milk in a double boiler. Do 
not add flavoring till all ingredients are quite cold, as 
extracts are volatile and lose much of their strong *ih 
if added to a hot mixture. 

Gentiine Philadelphia Ice Cream is made from 
sweetened and flavored pure cream without the addi- 
tion of eggs or any thickening medium. 

French Ice Cream has a rich custard as its base. 

Punch is a water ice with cordial or other liquor 
added. 

Sherbet is a water ice without the addition of 
whites of eggs. 

Mousse and Parfait are cream mixtures frozen with- 
out stirring. 

Have the liquid perfectly cold when put into the 
freezer. 

When fruit is used do not add it till the mixture 
is about half frozen; also be sure that all fruit is 
thoroughly mashed, or it will freeze too hard. Use 
about one cup of fruit, nuts or macaroons to one 
quart of cream, and allow room for the cream to 
expand — one and one-half pints being sufficient for 
a quart freezer. 

171 



172 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

Crush the ice and mix with the salt before packing 
it around the freezer can. 

For Ice Cream use one part of salt to three parts 
of ice by measure. 

For Mousses and Parfaits, which are not stirred, 
equal measures of ice and salt should be used, as is 
also the case when previously frozen mixtures are 
being moulded. 

For Water Ices two parts of ice to one of salt will 
give the best results. 

In the preparation of ice cream, after the freezer 
can is in place, filled, and the ice and salt packed 
around it, let the mixture stand about five minutes; 
then turn the crank steadily, but not too fast, for the 
first few moments, afterwards increasing the speed 
till the freezing is completed. Then remove the 
dasher and scrape the mixture from the sides of the 
can, packing it down firmly. Replace the top on 
the can and cover with more ice. Put a piece of 
carpet or other heavy material over all, and stand 
aside for the mixture to ripen. 

VanUIa Ice Cream 

1 pint milk. 2 teaspoons vanilla extract. 

3 eggs. yi teaspoon salt. 

1 cup sugar. 2 cups thin cream. 

Scald the milk, add the well-beaten eggs to it and 
cook in a double boiler till as thick as boiled custard. 
Remove from the fire, add the sugar and, when cold, 
the vanilla, salt and cream. Freeze, and set aside to 
ripen before serving. 

Various additions and flavorings may be added to 
this which may be called a "stock cream''; for ex- 
ample, two squares of chocolate melted over hot 
water may be added to the scalded milk before the 
eggs are put in, to give chocolate cream; or one- 
half cup of coffee may be scalded with the milk and 
the grounds afterwards removed by straining, the 
eggs added and the cream frozen as usual, for coffee 



ICE CHEAM AND ICES 173 

ice cream. Crystallized cherries or ginger may be 
cut in small pieces and added to the cream when it is 
half frozen, when it will be known by the name of the 
fruit added. 

Brown Bread Ice Cream 

This cream may be made by the previous rule, add- 
ing one cup of brown bread crumbs, dried and 
crushed, to the cream just before putting it into the 
freezer. 

Chocolate Ice Cream 

1 quart thin cream. 5^ teaspoon salt. 

1 cup sugar. 2 squares unsweetened bak« 

2 teaspoons vanilla extract ing chocolate. 

Scald the cream, add the sugar and let it melt, and 
when the cream is cold add the extract, salt and the 
chocolate, the latter melted by placing it in a cup over 
boiling water. Stir well to blend the ingredients 
thoroughly, freeze and stand aside to ripen. 

If preferred, the chocolate when melted may be 
added to the cream while the latter is hot; but the 
vanilla must be left out till just before freezing as the 
flavor would be lost if added to the hot mixture. 



Philadelphia Ice Cream 

1 quart thin cream. 1 cup sugar. 

Flavoring. 

Scald the cream, without actually boiling it; add 
the sugar and, when cold, the flavoring. Freeze, 
turning the dasher steadily but not too fast. When 
set, remove the dasher, pack the cream down and put 
aside to ripen. 

Peach Ice Cream 

1 pint milk. 2 cups peach pulp. 

1 cup heavy cream. yi teaspoon almond extract. 

IK cups sugar. 

Scald the milk and cream, add the sugar and allow 
the mixture to cool; put in the flavoring and half 



174 BUMFORD COMPLtTTE COOK BOOS 

freeze, then add the peach pulp and finish freezing. 
Remove the dasher, pack the cream down and cover 
closely. Set aside to ripen before serving. 

Burnt Almond Ice Cream 

1 oup cream. 1 cup sugar. 

2 cups milk. 1 cup almonds. 

4 egg yolks. ]4 teaspoon almond extract. 

yi cup sugar. 

Scald the cream and milk and pour over the yolks 
of eggs and one cup of the sugar; cook in a double 
boiler till the mixture will coat the back of a spoon. 
Set aside to cool while the almonds are being pre- 
pared. \ 

Melt the remaining one-third cup sugar in a frying- 
pan over a gentle heat, and cook till it forms a 
caramel. Blanch and chop the almonds finely, add 
them to the caramel, and brown. Cool till hard, then 
pound finely and add with the extract to the custard. 
Freeze and set aside to ripen. 

Frozen Custard 

1 quart milk. 1 cup sugar. 

6 egg yolks. 1 cup cream. 

1 teaspoon vanilla extract. 

Scald the milk and pour it over the yolks of eggs 
previously beaten with the sugar. Turn into the 
inner vessel of a double boiler and cook over hot 
water till the custard coats the back of a spoon. 
Strain, and when cold add cream and flavoring. 
Freeze and stand aside to ripen before serving. 

Nesselrode Pudding 

1 cup mashed chestnuts. ]/i cup water. 

1 cup raisins. 4 e^g yolks. 

J^ cup canned peaches. 1 pmt cream. 

yi eup crystallized cherries. 1 teaspoon vanilla extract. 

1 cup sugar. yi teaspoon almond extract. 

Seed the raisins and cut up the peaches and cherries. 
Boil the water and sugar together and when they have 



ICE CREAM AND ICES 175 

s cooked five minutes pour them over the beaten yolks 

f of the eggs, beating while pouring; cook in a double 

boiler till as thick as boiled custard, strain and stand 
aside till cold. Add the flavoring, cream whipped till 
stiff, and the nuts. Turn into the freezer and, 
when beginning to stiffen, add the fruit. Finish 
freezing, pack in a mould and bury in ice for two 
g hours. 

Milk Sherbet 

i 

I 1 quart milk. Grated rind of 1 lemon and 

IK cups sugar. juice of 2. 

Add the sugar to the milk and stir till dissolved, 
turn into the freezer and freeze till just beginning to 
set; then add the juice and rind of the lemons, and 
finish freezing. 

Raspberry Sherbet 

1 pint raspberry juice. 2 cups sugar. 

1 quart water. Juice of 2 lemons. 

Crush and heat the raspberries so that the juice 
may be extracted more easily; pass through a fine 
sieve or cheese cloth to keep back the seeds. Boil the 
sugar and half the water to form a syrup, add the 
remainder of the water, the raspberry and lemon 
juice. Freeze as soon as the mixture is cold and, if 
' possible, stand aside for an hour or more to ripen. 



Orange Water Ice 

1 pint water. 3 egg whites . 

1 cup sugar. Grated rind and juice of 

2 teaspoons granulated 2 oranges. 

gelatine. Juice of 1 large lemon. 

Boil the water and sugar together for ten minutes ,- 
add the gelatine, which has been previously softened 
in two tablespoons of cold water, and allow the mix- 
ture to become quite cold; then add the beaten whites 
of the eggs, the orange rind and juice and the lemon 
juice. Freeze, turning the dasher slowly but steadily. 



176 BUMFORD COMPLETE OOOK BOOK 

and when set, remove the dasher, pack the iee down 
solidly in the can, cover and pat aside to ripen. 



Coffee Pufait 

1 eap sugar. 3 egg whites. 

1 cup water. 1 cup stnmg coffee. 

2 cups whipped cream. 

Cook the sugar and water till they form a thick 
syrup; beat the whites of the eggs and pour the boil- 
ing syrup over them. Cool, add the coffee and, when 
quite cold, the whipped cream. Mix all well and put 
the mixture into a mould, cover very closely, and 
bury in ice and salt for several hours. 



Roman Punch 

1 quart water. Juice of 2 lemons. 

IK cups sugar. % cup rum. 

Boil the sugar and water till the sugar is dissolved; 
remove from the fire and, when cold, add the lemon 
juice. Partly freeze and, when beginning to thicken, 
add the rum and finish freezing. Let the punch 
ripen at least two hours before serving. 



MBMORANDA 



HEMORASDA 



CAITNING, PRESERVING AND PICKLING 

THE chief difference between canning and preserv- 
ing is in the amount of sugar used. In canning, 
from one-fourth to one-third is the most common 
quantity; while in jelly making, from three-fourths 
to equal parts may be required, according to the 
acidity of the fruit. 

Canning is the more economical method, and pos- 
sesses the advantage of retaining more nearly the 
fresh flavor of the fruit. With many housekeepers 
the chances that a jar of fruit will keep perfectly, 
or that it will spoil, are about even. Many consider 
it a question of luck, but if fruit is cooked thoroughly, 
placed in sterilized jars and properly sealed, it must 
keep, and can neither mould nor ferment. The jars 
must be free from cracks and used for no other pur- 
pose than canning fruit. The rubbers must be new, 
and sterilized at the same time as the jars; it is not 
economy to use old rubbers. 

To insure success three rules must be followed: 

1. All fruit used, while ripe, must not be over- 
ripe nor at all soft. 

2. Absolute cleanliness must be observed in every- 
thing used for cooking and storing the fruit: have all 
jars, covers, rubbers, spoons, etc., sterilized immedi- 
ately before using. 

3. Cover all jars or glasses while the contents are 
still scalding hot, so that no spores of mould may 
reach the fruit. In the case of jellies, if not con- 
venient to seal them at once, cover with sheets of 
glass while cooling. 

To sterilize utensils and receptacles used in jelly 
making and canning, wash thoroughly and place in 
a pan, cover with cold water and bring to a fast 
boil. Fill each jar or glass as removed from the 
boiling water without allowing time to cool. 

Jelly bags may be made of cheese cloth, muslin or 
flannel. Before using, wet with cold water, other- 

179 



180 EUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

wise some juice will be absorbed by the bag and 
wasted. 

Canned fruits are richer if cooked in a sjrrup 
instead of in water to which sugar is added to form 
a syrup after the fruit is cooked. 

TO PREPARE STRUPS FOR CANNED FRUITS 

For Plums, Peaches, Cherries, Pears, Blackberries 

and other sweet varieties of fruits, use one pound 
of sugar to a quart of water. 

For the more acid fruits, such as currants, sour 
cherries, etc., use one pound of sugar to a pint and 
a half of water. The longer the sugar and water are 
cooked together the heavier the sjnrup will be. Cook 
without stirring, to prevent crystallizing. 

As a general rule fifteen minutes cooking after 
reaching boiling point will be sufficient to sterilize 
fruits, with the exception of very seedy ones, such 
as currants, which will take a little longer owing to 
the viscous nature of the substance surrounding the 



The Selection of Fruit. Be sure that it has been 
freshly gathered on a dry day and is not over- 
ripe. The finest flavor does not develop till the 
fruit ripens, but the pectin, which is the jellying 
principle, loses some of its properties immediately 
after this stage; therefore, use fruit that is rather 
under than over ripe, especially for jellies and pre- 
serves. 

When washing is necessary place the fruit, a little 
at a time, in a colander and run water gently through 
and over it, draining well afterwards. Peaches can 
be pared without waste by dipping a few at a time 
in boiling water and removing the skin with a sharp 
knife, as one would remove the skin from a tomato. 

To Can Fruit in Jars over the Fire. Fill the jars 
with prepared fruit and place in a steamer or 
other large vessel containing warm water. The jars 
must be protected from the bottom and sides of the 



CANNING, PRESERVING AND PICKLING 181 

vessel and from each other, either by putting them 
in a rack made for the purpose, or by placing hay, 
excelsior or paper under and around them. Put on 
the covers but do not screw them down. Let the 
water come within four inches of the top of the jars, 
and cover the cooking vessel to prevent the escape 
of steam. Cook for fifteen minutes after reaching 
boiling point; take out the jars, one at a time, fill 
with boiling syrup, seal and cool. Tighten the cov- 
ers when the fruit is cold. 

To Can by the Open Kettle Process. Make a 
syrup of any desired sweetness. If a very rich flavor 
is wanted make the syrup from sugar and extra fruit 
juice instead of sugar and water. Prepare the fruit, 
cook it in the syrup till tender, and then fill and seal 
the sterilized jars as usual. It is the sterilizing, not 
the quantity of sugar used, that insures the keeping 
of fruit. 

To Can without Cooking. This method is suit- 
able for sour fruits such as rhubarb and gooseberries. 
Cut the former into two-inch lengths; top and tail 
the latter. Fill the jars with the fruit and run cold 
water from the faucet into them for ten minutes. 
Seal as usual. The natural acid of the fruit will keep 
it without cooking. 

Always examine the jars carefully before putting 
away, and be sure the covers are screwed as tightly 
as possible. It is a wise precaution to turn each 
jar upside down for a short time. 

As all canned fruits keep better in a dark, cool 
place, an excellent plan is to put each jar into a 
red or blue paper bag which protects it from light. 



JELLT MAKING 

All fruits for jelly making should be gathered just 
.before they are fully ripe and on a dry day. Acid 
fruits are most suitable as they contain more pectin 
— the jellying principle — than the sweeter varieties. 



182 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

Strawberries and blackberries are difficult to make 
jelly from without the addition of some other fruit, 
such as apple, currants, etc. 

Currant and Grape Jellies. Pick over the fruit 
carefully and remove all foreign matter; put in 
a preserving kettle and crush to liberate the juice, 
heat till it flows freely, then place in a jelly bag 
previously wrung out of cold water, and let the juice 
drip slowly. It may be left to drip over night. 
Measure, heat to boiling point, add the heated sugar — 
pound to pint — and boil five minutes; skim if neces- 
sary, test and, if it jellies, pour at once into glasses. 
Cover according to any of the directions given later. 

If a light, delicate color is desired in making cur- 
rant jelly, the stalks must be removed. This takes 
time, but the result warrants it. 

In some cases good jelly can be made by using only 
three-fourths of a pint of sugar to a pint of juice. 
This applies to fruits which contain a large proportion 
of sugar in themselves and also when the season is 
exceptionally dry and sunny. 

Apple, Plum, Crab-Apple or Quince Jelly. Wash, 
wipe and stem, and from apples, crab-apples and 
quinces remove the blossom; quinces need hard rub- 
bing to remove the fuzz; from plums remove the stones. 
Cut all fruits into convenient-sized pieces, using a 
silver knife to prevent discoloration, and add water — 
for apples and crab-apples half as much water as fruit; 
for the other kinds of fruit use a little less water as 
they have more juice of their own. Cook until tender 
and strain through a jelly bag. Measure the juice 
and add the sugar, pound to pint, unless the fruit is 
very sweet, when a little less should be used; cook till 
the juice jellies when a little is cooled in a saucer; 
then put into glasses, and cover. It must be remem- 
bered that too long boiling destroys the jellying prin- 
ciple; consequently the fruit must not be allowed to 
cook longer than necessary. 

If the sugar is heated after measuring, the jelly will 
be clearer and jell more quickly. The heating can be 



CANNING, PRESERVING AND PICKLING 183 

J done while the fruit juice is coming to the boiling 

I point. 

Jellies made by the Cold Process are the most deli- 

, cate, but are not likely to keep quite as well as when 

I fruit juice and sugar are cooked together. The 

method followed is the same as for ordinary jelly so 
far as the cooking, straining and measuring of the 
fruit and juice are concerned. The sugar — pound for 
pint — is added to the strained juice and dissolved; the 
sterilized glasses filled, and covered with sheets of 
glass to keep out the dust and attract the rays of the 
sun, and the jellies left in a sunny place till set. 
They are then covered according to directions given. 

TO COVER JELLIES 

There are three methods in common use: 

1. Dip a round of paper in either alcohol or brandy, 
lay it on top of the jelly as soon as it is cold and then 
put the tin cover of the glass over the top. 

2. Dip a round of paper in slightly-beaten white of 
egg, cover the glass with this and press down till the 
paper adheres closely. The paper must be large 
enough to overlap the top of the glass at least half 
an inch on all sides. 

3. Cover the jelly, when cold, with melted parafEne 
wax, having the wax quarter of an inch thick as it 
contracts when cold, and if too thin a portion of the 

. jelly will be left uncovered. 

Preserved Rhubarb 

6 pounds rhubarb. Rind of 1 lemon, or 1 ounce 

4 pounds sugar. whole ginger, if desired. 

Make a syrup of the sugar with just enough water 
|- to prevent burning and add the lemon, or ginger if 

i used. Cut the rhubarb into two-inch lengths and 

^ cook in the syrup gently to prevent breaking. It is 

», better to cook a small quantity at a time. Place the 

fruit in jars as soon as tender; boil the syrup rapidly 
^ till it is thick, pour over the fruit, and seal. 



184 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

Spiced Grapes 

8 pounds grapes. 4 sticks cinnamon. 

4 pounds sugar. 1 ounce whole cloves. 

3 cups vinegar. 2 blades maoe. 

Eemove and set aside the skins of the grapes; cook 
the pulp in the vinegar with the spices tied in cheese 
cloth, till the grapes are soft. Pass as much as pos- 
sible through a fine sieve, keeping back the seeds. 
Add the skins and return to the fire; when boiling 
put in the sugar and bag of spices. Cook till thick 
and then put into glasses and seal. 

Ginger Pears 

% pound green ginger, 8 pounds sugar. 

scraped and chopped. 1 pint water. 

Juice ana shredded peel of 8 pounds pears weighed after 

4 oranges and 3 lemons. paring and coring. 

Cook the ginger, orange and lemon peel with a pint 
of water till tender; then add the sugar, orange and 
lemon juice; cook till the sugar is dissolved; put in 
the pears chopped coarsely, and cook very slowly for 
two hours. Put into small jars and cover when cold. 
The green ginger may be tied in a bag if preferred, 
and removed after the cooking is completed. 

Brandied Figs 

4 pounds figs. 2 cups water. 

4 pounds sugar. 2 inches vanilla bean. 

Brandy. 

Wash, soak and steam the figs ior twenty minutes. 
Make a syrup by boiling together the sugar and water, 
and when the sugar is dissolved add the figs and cook 
till they are transparent. Set aside for twenty-four 
hours; then drain off the liquid, boil it down till very 
thick and add the vanilla bean to it while cooking. 
When cold remove the vanilla, and measure and add 
an equal quantity of the best French brandy. Put 
the figs in bottles or jars, fill to overflowing with the 
syrup, and seal at once. 



. CANNING, PRESERVING AND PICKLING 186 

Gooseberry Jelly 

3 quarts of green goose- 2 quarts water, 

berries. Sugar. 

Wash the gooseberries, put them in a preserving 
kettle with the water and cook over a slow fire till the 
berries are soft enough to mash easily; strain, and 
press through a jelly bag, and to every pint of juice 
add one pound sugar. Cook rapidly for ten minutes, 
skimming well while boiling. Turn into glasses, and 
seal when cold. 

Orange Marmalade 

1 dozen oranges. Water. 

IJ/^ pounds sugar to each If the oranges are sweet, 1 
pound of fruit. lemon to each 4 oranges. 

If possible procure the bitter Seville oranges, or, if 
these are not obtainable, use lemons in the propor- 
tion named. 

Wash the fruit and cut into the thinnest possible 
slices, cover with cold water, using one pint of water 
to each pound of fruit and set aside over night. In the 
morning bring to the boiling point and cook very 
slowly till the skins are suflSciently tender to be 
easily pierced by the head of a pin. When cold 
weigh again and add one and one-half pounds of 
sugar for every pound of fruit and juice, and cook till 
thick and transparent. Put in glasses, and seal when 
cold. 

Lemon Marmalade 

1 dozen lemons. Water. 

1>^ pounds sugar to each pound of fruit and water. 

Choose smooth, thin-skinned lemons, cut into very 
thin slices, remove and keep the seeds. Add a pint 
of water for each pound of fruit and stand aside over 
night. In the morning boil gently till the fruit is 
tender, and again set aside till cold. Weigh and add 



186 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

the sugar in the proportions named. Put the seeds 
in a bag and cook with the fruit. When the whole is 
thick and transparent put into glasses, and seal when 
cold. 

Chopped Raw Pickle 

2 quarts tomatoes. % cup salt. 

% cup grated horseradish. % cup mustard seeds. 

2 large onions. ^ teaspoon each ground cin- 

2 heads celery. namon, cloves, ginger 

2 red peppers. and mace. 

1 cup sugar. 1 quart vinegar. 

Peel and chop the tomatoes, add the horseradish, 
then the onions, celery and peppers, all chopped. 
Mix well, and stir in the sugar, salt, mustard seeds and 
spices. Pour the vinegar over and mix thoroughly. 
Keep at least two weeks before using. 



Green Tomato Pickle 

% bushel green tomatoes. 1 stick cinnamon. 
% peck onions. 1 teaspoon ground mace. 

2 cups salt. yi cup whole peppercorns. 

9 green peppers. 2 tablespoons mustard. 

1 teaspoon ground cloves. 5 pounds brown sugar. 
3 quarts vinegar. 

Slice the onions and tomatoes, sprinkle the salt over 
them and stand over night. Drain and place in a 
large saucepan with the peppers from which the 
seeds have been removed, and then add the spices, 
sugar, mustard and vinegar and cook one hour. Seal 
when cold. 

Mustard Pickle 

24 small cucumbers. % pound mustard. 

1 quart very small onions. % ounce turmeric. 

2 cauliflowers. ^ cup flour. 
2 quarts green tomatoes. 1 cup sugar. 

6 green peppers. Zyi quarts vinegar. 

Salt. 

Cut such of the vegetables as require it into very 
small pieces, adding those that are small enough 



CANNING, PRESERVING AND PICKLING 187 

without cutting, and stand them over night in brine 
sufficiently strong to float an egg. In the morning 
scald all together and drain thoroughly. 

Mix the mustard, turmeric, flour and sugar to a 
smooth paste with one pint of the vinegar, and add 
to the three quarts of vinegar which has been brought 
to the boiling point. Cook twenty minutes, add the 
vegetables and, when cold, place in jars and seal. 



ChUi Sauce 

2 dozen tomatoes. 2 tablespoons salt. 

3 green peppers. 1 tablespoon each ground 
3 onions. cloves, nutmeg, ginger 
% cup sugar. and auspice. 

1 quart vinegar. 

Scald and peel the tomatoes, cut them in small 
pieces and put with all the other ingredients into a 
granite saucepan. Cook very slowly for three hours, 
and then bottle and seal. 



Sweet Pickled Prunes 

4 pounds prunes. % ounce cloves. 

2 pounds sugar. 1 stick cinnamon. 

2 cups vinegar. % ounce whole ginger. 

Wash the prunes well, soak in cold water for 
twenty-four hours, and then bring them to the boil- 
ing point in the same water. Boil together the 
sugar, vinegar and spices for ten minutes; add the 
prunes, drained from the water, and simmer gently 
till tender. When cold, put in jars and seal closely. 



Pickled Peaches 

4 quarts peaches. 3 or 4 sticks cinnamon. 

2 pounds sugar, prefer- Cloves. 

ably brown. \yi pints vinegar. 

Make a syrup with the sugar, vinegar and cinna- 
mon, cooking them together for twenty minutes. 



188 BUMFORB COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

Remove the skin of the peaches by dipping them for 
a moment in boiling water, then rubbing with a cloth. 
Stick two cloves in each peach and then cook in the 
syrup till tender. Do not try to cook too many 
peaches at one time. Boil the syrup ten minutes 
after all the fruit is done, then pour it over the 
peaches, and seal. 

Tomato Catsup 

4 quarts sliced tomatoes. 1 quart vinegar. 
8 green peppers. 2 tablespoons white pepper. 

4 tablespoons salt. 3 tablespoons mustard. 

1 tablespoon allspice. 

Cook the tomatoes and peppers in the salt and 
vinegar till tender. Rub through a sieve, passing 
through all the pulp possible; add the spices and 
seasonings, and boil all slowly for three hours. Bottle 
and seal when cold. 



MEMORANDA 



memorauda 



RECIPES FOR THE CHAFING-DISH 

THE chafing-dish affords a means of preparing 
on the serving table, at the time of eating, 
small dishes which do not need very long cooking. 
Alcohol or gas may be employed as the fuel, but the 
former is generally used. Proof alcohol is best as it 
gives greater heat and burns longer than wood 
alcohol. All good chafing-dishes have two pans, the 
blazer and the hot-water pan. With dishes contain- 
ing eggs, and those requiring slow cooking, use both 
pans. Such preparations as will not be harmed by close 
contact with the flame may be cooked without the 
water pan. 

The lamp may be adjusted to give either a moder- 
ate or quick heat. In preparing to use a chafing- 
dish at table be sure that all ingredients, seasoning, 
etc., are at hand that no time may be wasted when 
the lamp is lighted. Have a tray under the dish in 
case water or alcohol overflows. 

All dishes that can be cooked in a short time in a 
frying-pan or saucepan are suitable for the chafing- 
dish, and all recipes given under this heading can be 
cooked over the fire. Frying-pans, toasters and 
many accessories can be obtained for use with the 
chafing-dish. 



Celeried Oysters 

1 tablespoon butter. 1 tablespoon minced celery. 

1 dozen large oysters. Seasoning. 

1 wineglass sherry. 

Melt the butter, add the oysters and celery, cook 
three minutes, add seasoning and sherry, and serve 
very hot on buttered toast. 

191 



192 EUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

Epicurean Oysters 

1 pint solid oysters. ^ teaspoon celery salt. 

3 tablespoons butter. Pepper or cayenne to taste. 

}4 cup cream. 2 tablespoons sherry. 

Pick over the oysters carefully and cook them three 
minutes with the butter; add the cream, celery salt 
and pepper, and bring to the boiling point. Put in 
the sherry at the moment of serving, and pour over 
hot toast. 

Oysters with Mushrooms 

2 cups oysters. Salt, pepper and lemon juice 

3 tablespoons butter. to taste. 
3 laree mushrooms. 1 egg yolk. 

2 tablespoons flour. 2 tablespoons sherry. 

Scald the oysters and drain the liquor from them; 
melt the butter, chop the mushrooms and cook them 
in the butter for three minutes; add the flour, then 
the oyster liquor, stirring constantly and, when boil- 
ing, add the seasoning. Put in and heat the oysters 
and, lastly, add the egg and wine. Serve very hot 
on toast. 

Oysters a la Poulette 

3 tablespoons butter. ^ cup thin cream. 
3 tablespoons flour. 1 pint solid oysters. 

1 cup milk. 1 teaspoon lemon Juice. 

Put the butter and flour in the chafing-dish, and 
cook till they are smoothly blended. Add the milk 
a little at a time, stirring constantly till the sauce 
boils; put in the cream and again stir till boiling 
point is reached. Pick over the oysters and free 
them from shell, heat in the sauce and, just before 
serving, add the lemon juice. 

Pigs in Blankets 

1 dozen large oysters. 1 dozen thin slices of bacon. 

Seasoning. 

Pick over the oysters carefully, roll each^in a slice 
of bacon and fasten the ends with a skewer. Put in 



EECIPES FOR THE CHAFING-DISH 193 

a hot chafing-dish and cook till the bacon is crisp. 
Season, and serve very hot. 



Minced Clams 

25 clams. 2 tablespoons chopped 

4 tablespoons melted parsley. 

butter. Salt^ pepper and lemon juice. 

% cup clam liquor. 

Open and mince the clams, saving all the liquor. 
Melt the butter, add the minced clams and liquor, 
cook three minutes and put in the parsiey and lemon 
juice. Heat thoroughly, season, and serve on toast. 



Fticasseed Clams 

^ tablespoons butter. ^ cup cream. 

1}4 tablespoons flour. 1}^ dozen clams. 

1 pup clam juice. 2 egg yolks. 

X cup sherry. 

Melt the butter, add the flour and, when thes^^are 
smooth, the clam juice; next the cream and, as soon 
as the sauce boils, the clams coarsely chopped. Cook 
three minutes, and then add the egg yolks and sherry. 
Serve on toast. 



Deviled Lobster 

2 tablespoons butter. 1 teaspoon lemon juice. 

1 tablespoon dry mustard. Meat of 1 lobster. 
y^ teaspoon salt. H cup butter. 

1 tablespoon Worcestershire or tomato sauce. 

Beat the two tablespoons of butter to a cream; add 
the mustard, salt, sauce and lemon juice. Gut the 
lobster in neat pieces, saut£ for about six minutes in 
the remaining butter and, when nearly done, add the 



194 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

creamed mixture. Heat the whole thoroughly, and 
serve on toast. 



Lobfter k la Newburg 

2 pounds lobster. Grating of nutmeg. 

yf cup butter. K cup thin cream. 

X teaspoon salt. 3 egg yolks. 

JPew grains cayenne. 1 tablespoon sherry. 

B^move the lobster meat from the shell and cut 
in small pieces. Melt the butter, add the lobster 
and cook three minutes. Put in the seasonings, next 
the cream and, when this is hot, yolks of the eggs 
slightly beaten. Stir till thick, add the sherry and 



serve very hot. 



Shrimps a la Creole 

2 tablespoons butter. 1}{ eupe etewed, strained 

1 teaspoon onion juice or tomato. 

grated onion. 1 bay leaf. 

lyi tablespoons flour. Salt and pepper to taste. 

1 can or 1 pint shrimps. 

Melt the butter, put in the onion juice and flour 
and stir till smooth; add the seasoninp, tomato and 
bay leaf, and stir constantly till boiling. Pick over 
the shrimps and heat them in the sauce. Serve plain 
or with boiled rice. 



DeTOed Eggs 

2 tablespoons butter. }i teaspoon paprika or 

1 teaspoon dry mustard. pepper. 

2 tablespoons tomato yi teaspoon salt. 

catsup. 6 hard-cooked eggs. 

2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce. 

Put together in the chafing-dish and heat all the 
ingredients, except the eggs. Bring to the boiling 
point and add the eggs cut in slices. Heat, and 
serve on hot buttered toast. 



RECIPES FOR THE CHAFING-DISH 195 

Scrambled Eggs with Tomatoes 

2 tablespoons butter. 1 cup canned or stewed 

1 teaspoon minced onion. tomato. 

Salt and pepper to taste. 
6 eggs. 

Melt the butter and cook the onion in it for two 
minutes; add the tomato and seasonings and then 
the eggs slightly beaten. Cook till creamy, and serve 
on toast. 

Eggs with Green Peppers 

2 tablespoons butter. 1 tablespoon tomato catsup. 
4 finely-minced green 6 eggs beaten with % cup 

peppers. cream. 

2 tablespoons grated cheese. 

Cook all the ingredients, except the eggs and cream, 
two minutes; then add eggs and stir till thick. Serve 
on toast. 

Welsh Rabbit 

\yi pounds cheese. 1 teaspoon dry mustard. 

1 tablespoon butter. }^ teaspoon pepper or a little 
}4 cup ale or milk. less of cayenne. 

1 tablespoon Worcester- 1 egg. 
shire sauce. 

Cut the cheese into small pieces and put it in the 
upper part of the chafing-dish, having water in the 
lower pan. Let the cheese melt and become creamy, 
add the butter, ale (or milk) and seasonings; cook till 
smooth and, just before serving, stir in the egg 
slightly beaten. This prevents the rabbit being 
stringy. Have ready slices of bread or toast (pref- 
erably the former), dip them into the cheese and 
pour more over them on the serving plate. 



Savory Rabbit 

6 slices bread. 4 ounces grated cheese. 

Butter. 2 tablespoons ale or thin 
Minced ham or anchovy cream. 

paste. Seasoning to taste. 



196 BUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

Cut the bread into round or square slices and 
saut6 in the butter till slightly crisped. The quan- 
tity of butter will depend on the freshness of the 
bread, as the fresher it is the more butter it will 
absorb. Spread each piece with the ham or anchovy 
and keep hot. Melt the cheese in the blazer of the 
chafing-dish, and add the ale and seasoning. Spread 
over the ham and serve immediately. 



Blushing Bunny 

1}4 pounds cheese. y^ teaspoon mustard. 

1 tablespoon butter. }4 teaspoon pepper. 

1 cup cooked, strained 1 teaspoon lemon juice. 

tomato, or canned 

tomato soup. 

Melt the cheese as for Welsh Rabbit; add the 
butter and tomato, stirring constantly; season to 
taste, and add the lemon juice just before serving. 



Cheese Fondue 

1 tablespoon butter. 2 cups grated mild cheese. 

1 cup milk. 1 teaspoon dry mustard. 

1 cup bread crumbs. Cayenne. 

2 eggs. 

Melt the butter in the chafing-dish; add the milk, 
bread crumbs, cheese and mustard, and season with 
cayenne. Stir constantly and add two lightly-beaten 
eggs a moment before serving. 



Cheese Toast Sandwiches 

J< cup grated cheese. A little cayenne. 

1 tablespoon cream. Rounds of bread. 

}i teaspoon dry mustard. }i cup butter. 

Put the cheese in a bowl with the cream and sea- 
sonings, adding more cream if necessary to form a 
paste. Spread this between the slices of bread, and 
press closely together. Saut6 on both sides in the 
butter melted in the blazer of the chafing-dish. 



RECIPES FOR THE CHAFING-DISH 197 

Chicken Livers Sauted 

3 tablespoons butter, or 2 tablespoons flour, 

butter and bacon fat. 1 cup stock. 

6 livers. 1 teaspoon lemon juice, 

1 teaspoon onion juice. Seasoning. 

Melt the butter and cook the livers and onion juice 
in it for three minutes; add the flour, stir smoothly, 
ajid pour in the stock; bring to the boiling point and 
cook two minutes. Season, and serve at once or the 
livers will become tough. 



Lamb Terrt^in 

2 cups cold lamb cut into 1 tablespoon Worcestershire 

dice. sauce. 

2 tablespoons butter. 1 cup stock. 

1 teaspoon diy mustard. % cup cream. 

1 tablespoon flour. 2 hard-cooked eggs. 

2 tablespoons sherry. 

Remove superfluous fat from the lamb. Melt the 
butter and add to it the mustard, flour and, when 
these are smoothly mixed, the stock, cream and sauce. 
Cook five minutes after the sauce reaches boiling 
point. Put in the meat, and yolks of the eggs passed 
through a sieve. Heat, and then stir in whites of 
the eggs finely chopped, and the sherry. Season, 
and serve on toast. 



Sweetbreads with Peas 

2 tablespoons butter. % cup cream. 

\)4 tablespoons flour. 2 sweetbreads. 

1 cup milk. 1 cup French peas. 

Seasoning to taste. 

Melt the butter, add the flour and stir till smooth. 
Add the milk and cream gradually, stirring con- 
stantly till boiling. Have the sweetbreads pre- 
viously cooked and cut into large cubes, add to the 
sauce with the peas and seasoning, and heat 
thoroughly. 



198 BUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

Beviled Tomatoes 

4 firm tomatoes. 2 teaspoons sugar. 

yi cup butter. 1 teaspoon mustard. 



^e 



easoning of salt and 1 whole egg. 

pepper. 1 hard-cooked e 

4 tablespoons butter. X cup vinegar. 



Peel and slice the tomatoes, season, and cook in 
the butter till tender. Keep hot while the sauce is 
being prepared. Cream the butter, sugar and mus- 
tard; add the hp-rd-cooked and raw eggs, then the 
vinegar and seasoning. Cook in the upper pan, over 
hot water, till thick. Pour over the tomatoes, and 
serve hot. 



MEMORANDA 



MEHORAHDA 



sahdwiches 

BREAD for sandwiches should be not less than 
twelve hours old, rather close grained and of 
such shape as to cut without waste, the regular sand- 
wich loaves being the best for the purpose. 

The butter should be sufficiently soft to spread 
easily, and is better creamed as for cake. Season- 
ings can be sometimes beaten into the butter, thus 
saving labor in spreading. The bread may be spread 
with butter either before or after cutting from the 
loaf. Be sure that the slices are kept in the order of 
slicing that they may fit together after filling. 

Cheese and Green Pepper Sandwiches 

% pound cheese. Salt. 

3 green peppers. Slices of bread. 

Remove the seeds and white pith and pass the 
peppers through a meat chopper with the cheese, 
season to taste, and mix smoothly. The juice from 
the peppers will moisten the cheese sufficiently for it 
to spread easily. Have the bread cut rather thicker 
than usual for sandwiches. Spread the cheese paste 
rather thickly on one slice of bread and cover with 
another; press together firmly and toast over a hot 
fire. Cut into strips and tuck between the folds of a 
napkin to keep them hot. 

Monaco Sandwiches 

Yolks of 2 hard-cooked 2 tablespoons salmon or 

eggs. shrimp paste. 

3 tablespoons butter. 2 tablespoons butter. 

Pepper to taste. Unbuttered Graham or 

brown bread. 

Put the yolks of eggs into a bowl with the butter 
and rub with the back of a spoon till smooth. Add 

201 



202 BUMFOBD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

the pepper and fish paste and, when these are blended, 
the butter. Spread rather thickly between slices of 
bread and cut off the crusts. 



Ham and Egg Sandwiches 

Thin slices of buttered 1 tablespoon majronnaise or 
white bread. cream dressing to each 

Hard-cooked e^. egg. 

1 tablespoon minced ham Salt and pepper to taste, 
to each egg. 

Have the eggs finely chopped or pass them through 
a meat chopper; add the ham, dressing and seasoning, 
and mix well. Spread - the mixture on a slice of 
buttered bread and cover with another. Trim off 
the crusts and cut into diamonds or triangles* 



Boston Sandwiches 

Slices of thinly cut Boston }i cup peanuts. 

brown bread. 1 teaspoon lemon juice. 

2 rolls Neufchatel cheese. 2 tablespoons cream. 

6 stoned olives. Salt and pepper. 

Mash the cheese smoothly, add the olives chopped 
small, the peanuts passed through a meat chopper 
(peanut butter may be substituted), the lemon juice, 
cream and seasoning. Spread thickly on the brown 
bread and press two slices together. 



Savory Sandwiches 

3 tablespoons butter. 2 teaspoons chopped 
1 teaspoon capers. parsley. 

6 olives. A few drops of onion juice. 

1 tablespoon chopped Slices of buttered white or 
mustard pickle. Graham bread. 

Beat the butter to a cream, add the capers and 
olives chopped finely; mix these well with the butter 
and stir in the pickle, parsley and onion juice, with 



SANDWICHES 203 

salt if necessary. Spread between slices of either 
white or Graham bread, well buttered. 



Cheese Butter Sandwiches 

% cup butter. 1 teaspoon anchovy paste 

6 tablespoons dry, sharp- or sauce. 

flavored cheese. 2 teaspoons Worcestershire 

1 teaspoon made mustard. sauce. 

Slices of buttered bread. 

Beat the butter to a cream, add the cheese (grated), 
the mustard, anchovy and Worcestershire sauces. 
Beat till well blended, and spread between slices of 
buttered bread. 



Cuannbcr Suidwicliet 

2 cucumbers. % cup mayonnaiiau 

1 teaspoon onion iuiee. Salt and pepper. 

Shoes of buttered bread. 

Peel the eucumbens and remove the seeds if coarse; 
chop the eueumbers finely and place them in a cloth 
or a sieve to drain. To the <urained pulp add the 
onion juice, seasoning and mayonnaise. Spread be- 
tween slices of buttered whole wheat or Graham 
bread. 



9nt and Raisin Sandwiches 

\yi cups seeded raisins. Juice of half a lemon. 

% cup chopped nuts. Buttered Graham or white 

bread. 

Chop the raisins finely or pass them through a meat 
chopper with the shelled nuts; blend smoothly and 
moisten with the lemon juice. Spread between slices 
of well-buttered bread 



204 BUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

Clnb Sandwich 

Toasted bread. Slices of tomato. 

Slices of bacon. Lettuce. 

White meat of chicken. Mayonnaise dressing. 

Butter lightly a slice of toast and lay on it slices of 
bacon cut very thin and well broiled. Over this 
place slices of the white meat of chicken, then tomato, 
lettuce and a good portion of mayonnaise. Lay 
another slice of buttered toast over the top and 
serve at once. 

Sweet Chocolate Sandwiches 

2 squares chocolate. ^ cup shelled and finely- 

1 cup pulverized sugar. chopped nuts. 

2 tablespoons butter. 3 tablespoons cream. 

Slices of buttered white bread. 

Melt the chocolate over a gentle heat, add the 
butter, sugar and cream, and cook five minutes over 
hot water; add the nuts and mix. Cool slightly 
before spreading between the 6lic^.of buttered bread. 



hbhorauba 



MEMORAITDA 



CONFECTIONS 

Molasses Candy 

2 cups molasses. 2 tablespoons butter. 

2 cups brown sugar. % cup water. 

X cup vinegar. 

Put all the ingredients, except the vinegar, into a 
large saucepan and cook fast till a little of the mix- 
ture dropped into cold water feels brittle; add the 
vinegar, cook two minutes more and pour into a 
greased pan to cool. As soon as it can be easily 
handled, pull with the fingers till white. Cut into 
pieces before it is too hard. 

Maple Kisses 

2 cups maple sugar. X cup butter. 

K cup water. 1 cup shelled pecan nuts. 

Cook the water, sugar and butter till a little 
dropped in cold water forms a firm ball; add the 
nuts, stir till the mixture begins to cool and thicken, 
and then drop, in small spoonfuls, on a greased paper 
or plate. 

Peanut Brittle 

2 cups granulated sugar. 1 teaspoon butter. 

1 cup coarsely-chopped peanuts. 

Put the sugar into an iron saucepan and let it melt 
over a moderately hot fire; add the butter and nuts 
and immediately pour into a well-greased pan. 
Mark into squares when sufficiently cool. 

Peppermint Drops 

1 cup granulated sugar. % cup water. 

6 drops essence of peppermint. 

Cook the water and sugar till a little lifted on a 
fork or spoon spins a thread. Do not stir while cook- 
ing. Remove from the fire, add the peppermint and 
stir till the candy thickens and looks cloudy. Drop 
immediately from a teaspoon on a greased paper or 
plate. If it becomes too hard to drop, warm by 
standing the saucepan over hot water for a moment. 

207 



208 BUMPORD COMPLETE COOK BOOS 

Wintergreen drops may be made by the same rule, 
substituting wintergreen for the peppermint. 

Dakota Carameb 

2 cups brown sugar. yi cup butter. 

1 cup molasses. 1 cup milk. 

X pound grated chocolate. 1 cup shelled, chopped nuts. 

Put all ingredients, except the nuts, into a large 
saucepan, cook twenty minutes over a gentle heat 
and then test by dropping a little of the mixture into 
cold water. If it forms a firm ball remove from the 
fire, add the chopped nuts and pour into a greased 
tin. Cut into squares when nearly cold. 

Fudge 

2 cups sugar. H cup milk. 

1 tablespoon butter. 1 square (1 otmce) chocolate. 

Cook all together till a little dropped in cold water 
forms a soft ball; remove from the fire, beat well and 
pour into buttered pans. Cut into squares when 
nearly cold. 

Chocolate Creams 

1 egg white. 6 drops any desired flavor- 

2 tablespoons cold water. ing. 
Confectioners' sugar. yi pound sweet chocolate. 

Beat the egg and water together only till mixed; 
add the sugar till the ingredients form a stiff paste — 
about a cup and a half will probably be needed. 
Work in the flavoring with the sugar, then form into 
small balls. Grate the chocolate and put in a cup 
over hot water to melt; dip the balls into it, one at a 
time, using a fork for the dipping. Lay separately 
on waxed paper and, if necessary, dip a second time. 

Creamed Walnuts 

2 cups granulated sugar. }i cup water. 

Vanilla or other extract. Shelled walnuts. 

Cook the sugar and water, without stirring, till a 
little lifted from the pan on a fork will form a thread. 



CONFECTIONS 209 

Cool quickly and then add flavoring, and beat with a 
spoon till white and creamy. Make this cream into 
small balls with the fingers; press half a shelled Eng- 
lish walnut in each side and roll in fine granulated 
sugar; or dip each candy very gently in glac6 sugar. 

Glac^ Sugar 

2 cups granulated sugar. }i teaspoon cream of tartar. 

^ cup boiling water. 

Boil the sugar, water and cream of tartar together 
till a little dropped in cold water is quite brittle and 
clear. Do not stir while cooking. If the sugar be- 
comes too hard, add a tablespoon of water and cook 
and test again. Dip the prepared nuts in the hot 
syrup, one at a time, using a candy dipper or sugar 
tongs, being careful not to shake or stir the syrup. 
Lay the nuts, after dipping, on a greased paper or 
plate to harden. 



Cocoanut Cream Candy 

1 cocoanut. lyi poimds granulated sugar. 

Put the sugar and milk of the cocoanut together in 
a saucepan and cook five minutes; add the cocoanut 
and cook ten minutes longer, stirring constantly to 
prevent burning. Pour into greased pans and cool. 
Cut in squares and leave in a cool place two days to 
harden. 

French Nougat 

J^ pound confectioners' }4 pound shelled almonds, 

sugar. 

Put the sugar into a shallow pan — preferably an 
iron one — melt it very slowly, stirring constantly. 
Chop the almonds finely and add to the melted sugar. 
Pour into well-greased pans to cool, cut in squares 
when almost cold and, if desired, dip the squares in 
melted chocolate. 



210 EUMPORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

Butter Scotch 

2 cups sugar. 2 tablespoons water. 

A piece of butter the size of an egg. 

Put all together in a saucepan and cook, without 
stirring, till a little dropped in cold water is hard and 
brittle. Pour onto well-greased plates and, when 
nearly cold, mark into squares. 

Pralines 

2 cups confectioners' sugar. 1 cup maple S3rrup. 
yi cup cream. 2 cups nut meats. 

Boil the sugar, maple syrup and cream together till 
a little dropped in cold water forms a soft ball. Cool 
and beat till creamy; add the nuts and drop the 
mixture by spoonfuls on greased paper or plates. 

January Thaw 

2 cups brown sugar. 1 cup nuts. 

yi cup milk. Butter size of a walnut. 

Put sugar and milk in a saucepan and let it dissolve 
slowly; add butter and let boil until it forms a ball 
when dropped into cold water. Remove from stove, 
add the chopped nuts and beat well. Turn into a 
buttered pan and, when cool, cut in squares. 

Sea Foam 

2 cups brown sugar. 1 teaspoon vanilla extract. 

yi cup water. y^ cup chopped nuts. 

1 egg white. 

Boil the sugar and water together till a little 
dropped in cold water forms a soft ball. Pour the 
hot mixture over the stifHy-beaten white of the egg, 
beating while pouring. Add nuts and extract and 
beat vigorously till the candy stiffens. When nearly 
set drop by spoonfuls on paper. When cold the Sea 
Foam will harden so that it can be easily taken from 
the paper. 



MEMORAITDA 



XEHORANBA 



BEVERAGES 

Tea 

Use 2 teaspoons tea to a pint of water. 

Have the water freshly boiling, scald the teapot, 
put in the tea, and pour on boiling water in the 
proportion given. Cover, and keep in a warm place, 
but where the tea will not hoil, for three to five min- 
utes to " draw." If it can not be used at once pour off 
the tea and discard the leaves. An earthen teapot 
is preferable. 

Iced Tea 

Iced tea is made the same as the hot beverage and 
may be prepared some hours before using, the in- 
fusion being poured off the leaves as soon as the 
strength is extracted, then cooled, and placed near 
the ice till required for use; or the tea may be made 
at the time of serving and chilled by the plentiful 
addition of cracked ice. The former is the most 
economical method. Iced tea should be taken clear 
and weaker than when served hot, and slices of lemon 
should be passed with it. 

Boiled Coffee 

2 tablespoons coffee to 3 cups water. 
White of egg. 

Grind the coffee moderately fine, add half the white 
of an egg to it and put into a perfectly clean coffee- 
pot. Add enough cold water to moisten the coffee, 
then pour the measured water over, cover the pot 
closely and boil ten minutes. Then pour in half a 
cup of cold water, draw the pot to the side of the 
range and allow it to stand five minutes to settle 
before serving. Never let the coffee boil after the 
cold water has been added. 

213 



214 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

Filtered Coffee 

1 tablespoon of coSee to each cup. 

Have the coffee finely ground, the coffee-pot hot 
and the water freshly boiling. Put the coffee into 
the strainer or upper part of the pot, measure the 
water and pour it slowly over the coffee. When it 
has filtered through, pour it again over the grounds, 
keeping the pot where the water will remain at the 
boiling point but not actually boil during the process. 
The pot may stand in a vessel of boiling water during 
the filtering process if desired. 

Black or After-dinner Coffee 

Make according to rule for Filtered Coffee, using 
twice the quantity of coffee to each cup of water. 
Serve in very small cups. 

Caf^ au lalt 
1 tablespoon of coffee to each cup. 

Grind the coffee finely, and prepare as in Filtered 
Coffee, using only half the quantity of water. When 
filtered twice, pour off the coffee and add an equal 
amount of freshly scalded milk. 

Iced Coffee in Perfection 

1 pint good cold coffee. 1 pint milk. 

i teaspoon ground cinna^ Whipped cream, 
mon. CracKcd ice. 

Have both coffee and milk thoroughly chilled; mix 
well, add cracked ice and, when serving, put the 
whipped cream on top of each glass and dust over 
with cinnamon. 

Chocolate 

2 squares chocolate. Whipped cream. 

2 teaspoons sugar, 4 tablespoons cold water. 

3 cups milk. 1 teaspoon vanilla extract if 

liked. 



BEVERAGES 215 

Put the chocolate into a saucepan or the inner 
vessel of a double boiler with the water and sugar; 
cook over a gentle heat till the chocolate is melted, 
add the milk gradually and bring to the boiling point. 
Beat till foamy, flavor with vanilla, if liked, and 
serve with a spoonful of whipped cream on top of 
each cup. 

Cocoa 

2 tablespoons cocoa. 1 pint boiling water. 

2 tablespoons sugar. 2 cups boiling milk. 

Put cocoa and sugar in a saucepan, add to them 
half a cup of boiling water, and cook, stirring con- 
stantly, for five minutes. Add the remainder of the 
water, also the milk, and cook five minutes longer. 
Serve with cream if desired. 



Chocolate Cream ITectar 

2 squares (ounces) of 3 cups water. 

chocolate. 1 cup sugar. 

K cup liquid coffee. Whipped cream. 

1 teaspoon vanilla extract. 

Melt the chocolate in a dry saucepan over a gentle 
heat, add the coflfee (liquid) to it and cook two 
minutes, stirring constantly. Add sugar and water 
and cook five minutes. Chill, add vanilla and pour 
into glasses, each containing a tablespoon of whipped 
cream. Be sure the beverage is thoroughly chilled 
before serving. 

Fruit Punch 

2 pounds sugar. Juice of 6 oranges and 

2 quarts water. 4 lemons. 

2 quarts ApoUinaris or 2 cups sliced strawberries. 

other mineral water. 3 sliced bananas. 

1 large pineapple, 1 cup raspberry or other 

shredded. fruit syrup. 

Crushed ice. 

Boil the sugar and water together to form a syrup, 
add the ApoUinaris, fruit and ice, with more water if 
the punch is too strong. Serve very cold. 



216 EUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

Tea Punch 

1 cup strong tea. % cup maraschino cordiaL 

1 sliced lemon. 1 cup sugar. 

1 cup stoned cherries. 1 cup slightly crushed rasp- 
1 quart water or carbon- berries or strawberries* 

ated water. Cracked ice. 

Pour the tea (hot) over the sugar, then when cold 
add the fruit, water, cordial and ice. Chill thoroughly 
before serving. 



Blackberry Cordial 

1 quart blackberry juice. 2 teaspoons each grated nut- 
1 pound sugar. meg, cinnamon and ail- 

1 teaspoon grated cloves. spice. 

1 pint brandy. 

Crush enough blackberries to give a quart of juice, 
put in a porcelain saucepan with the sugar, and the 
spices tied up in a bag. Cook fifteen minutes after it 
boils, skim, and cover closely till cold. Strain, add 
the brandy, and bottle and seal. This will keep for 
years. 



Grape Juice 

Grapes. Sugar. 

Pick grapes from the stalks, crush them and place 
over a slow fire till the juice runs freely; then strain 
through a fine cloth or jelly bag, pressing out all the 
juice. Measure, and to each quart use a cup and a 
half of sugar. Scald the juice, add the sugar, boil 
five minutes after all the sugar is melted, and bottle 
and seal closely. 

Raspberry Vinegar 

4 quarts raspberries. 2 quarts cider vinegar. 

Sugar. 

Crush two quarts of raspberries and pour the 
vine^ax over them. Let stand two days, strain, and 



BBVEBAGES 217 

pour the same vinegar over the remaining two quarts 
of berries. Let stand again for two dajrs and after 
straining, measure the liquid. Add for each pint one 
pound of sugar. Boil five minutes, skim, bottle and 
seal. Use two tablespoons to a tumbler of water. 



Ginger Cup 

4 oranges. 1 dozen cloves. 

3 lemons. % teaspoon cinnamon. 

24 lumps of sugar. yi ^ated nutmeg. 

1 cup shredded pineapple. 1 pmt water, 

1 quart ginger ale. Cracked ice. 

Push the cloves into the oranges and let them 
stand an hour that the flavor may be extracted. 
Rub the sugar over the rind of the oranges and 
lemons, then add juice of these to the sugar. Add 
the spices and pineapple and let stand two hours. 
At the time of serving put in the water and ginger 
ale and pour over the cracked ice. 



Mint Cordial 

1 large bunch of mint. 1 pint water. 

Juice of 2 lemons. Juice of 1 orange. 

1 poimd sugar. 1 cup pineapple juice. 

Pick the leaves from the stalks of the mint, crush 
the leaves thoroughly, add the lemon juice and stand 
aside for one hour. Boil the water and sugar to a 
syrup, pour this over the lemon and mint; cool and 
strain. When cold, add the orange and pineapple 
juice and serve in glasses with a sprig of fresh mint in 
each. 

Lime Punch 

8 cubes sugar. \\i cups water. 

Juice of 2 oranges. Cfracked ice. 

Juice of 2 limes. Slice of pineapple. 

2 crystallized cherries. 

Rub the cubes of sugar over the rind of the oranges 
and limes; then put the sugar in a bowl and pour 



218 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

the lime and orange juices over it. Add the water, 
and serve when the sugar is melted, chilling with 
plenty of cracked ice. Put in the pineapple and 
cherries at the moment of serving. 

Claret Punch 

% cup sugar. 2 sprigs mint. 

1 pint claret. 1 sliced orange. 

Juice of 2 lemons. A few fresh strawberries if 

Cracked ice. in season. 

1 quart water. 

Dissolve the sugar in the water, add claret, lemon 
juice, ice and mint, crushing the latter slightly to 
extract its fragrance. Slice the orange thinly and 
add with the strawberries at the time of serving. 

MuUed Cider 

1 quart cider. 2 inches stick cinnamon. 

yi teaspoon whole allspice. 3 eggs, well beaten. 

Boil together the cider and spices for three min- 
utes; add carefully to the well-beaten eggs, beating 
while adding. Strain, and serve very hot. 



MEMORANDA 



MEMORAHDA 



RECIPES FOR THE SICK 

THE food eaten by a sick person has in many 
cases as much to do with rapid recovery as 
have drugs. It must be remembered that the palate 
is more sensitive in sickness than in health, both to 
seasonings and temperatures, so that less seasoning 
and more moderate degrees of heat and cold must be 
observed. 

Daintiness in serving greatly influences the appe- 
tite of the patient, and, therefore, for this reason it is 
preferable to serve small portions and present the 
meal by courses rather than place all on the tray at 
one time. Have all hot beverages brought to the door 
of the sick room in a covered pitcher, then poured into 
the cup, thus avoiding the danger of spilling liquids 
into the saucer while carrying them to the patient. 

Food should not be kept in the sick room between 
meals. It will be fresher and more appetizing if 
brought direct from storeroom or refrigerator when 
wanted. 

When liquid foods are given, other receptacles than 
those for medicine should be used, as the association 
of the two is oftentimes unpleasant. When the 
dietary is limited, serve the foods that are permitted, 
in as many forms as possible to avoid sameness. 
For instance, beef tea may be given hot in the form 
of beef essence — as savory jelly, frozen, and as beef 
tea custard; practically the same food but more 
palatable because served in different forms. 

Be very careful to keep such foods as milk, beef 
tea, etc., covered while in the refrigerator, to avoid 
contact with other or more odorous foods. If the 
refrigerator has more than one compartment reserve 
one exclusively for the use of the sick room. 

221 



222 BUMFOBD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

Lemonade 

1 lemon. % pint cold water. 

2 or 3 lumps of sugar. 

Rub the sugar over the rind of the lemon to extract 
a little of the flavor. Squeeze the lemon juice over 
the sugar, add the water and stir till the sugar is 
dissolved. If the lemon is very large a little more 
water may be used. A thin slice of the lemon may 
be cut off before squeezing and placed in the glass 
with the lemonade. 

A good substitute for the lemon juice is Horsford's 
Acid Phosphate. 

Barley Water 

IK tablespoons pearl H teaspoon salt, 

barley. Juice of half a lemon. 

1 quart cold water. Also a little sugar if desired. 

Wash the barley, pour the water over it and soak 
for several hours. Add salt and cook in a double 
boiler for at least three hours. Strain through cheese 
cloth or a fine strainer, flavor with the lemon, and 
add sugar if liked. 

Toast Water 

2 slices of stale bread 1 cup boiling water. 

toasted. y^ teaspoon salt. 

Toast the bread till golden brown and dry all 
through, or dry it in a moderately hot oven till 
golden brown and crisp. Pour the boiling water over 
it and add the salt; cover and set aside till cool 
Strain, and serve hot or cold. Some add milk, cream 
and sugar, and serve hot in place of tea or coffee. 

Eggnog 

1 egg. 1 tablespoon sugar. 

Yi cup milk. 1 tablespoon rum or brandy. 

Pinch of salt. 

Separate the white from the yolk of the efi;g, beat 
the latter and add sugar, salt and milk. Stir in the 



BBCIPES FOB THE SICE 223 

rum or brandy and beat, and add the white of stiffly- 
beaten egg at the last moment before serving. 

Junket Eggnog 

1 egg. 2 teaspoons sugar. 

1 cup milk. yi junket tablet. 

2 teaspoons wine. 

Separate the white from the yolk of the egg; add 
the sugar and wine to the yolk, then blend with the 
white. Have the milk lukewarm, add the egg mix- 
ture to it and immediately stir in the junket dis- 
solved in a teaspoon of cold water. Pour at once 
into small glasses and grate a little nutmeg or cinna- 
mon over the top. As soon as set put on ice to chilh 



Albumenized Milk 

1 egg white. }i cup lime water. 

1 cup milk. 

Mix all ingredients, place in a shaker or covered 
jar and shake well. Strain and serve at once, plain 
or sweetened as preferred. 



To SteriUze Milk 

Pour fresh milk into small bottles, filling them 
almost full. Put absorbent cotton in the necks in- 
stead of corks, and place the bottles in a saucepan 
containing sufficient cold water to almost fill the pan; 
bring nearly to boiling point and let the bottles remain 
in the water fifteen minutes. Then remove and cool. 



^liHne Whey 
1 cup milk. % cup sherry or port wine. 

Boil the milk, add the wine and remove from the 
fire at once. Let stand till the curd is separated 
from the whey, then strain through a fine cloth and 
serve as it is, or reheat. 



224 BUMFORD COin>L£TE COOK BOOK 

Acid Phosphate Whey 

1 cup hot milk. 1 teaspoon Horsford's Acid 

2 teaspoons sugar. Phosohate. 

Heat the milk in a small saucepan over hot water 
or in a double boiler; add the Acid Phosphate and 
cooky without stirring; until the whey separates. 
Strain through cheese cloth and add the sugar. If 
more acid is desired, add two or three drops of Hois- 
ford's Acid Phosphate. Serve hot or cold. 

Beef and Sago Broth 

yi pound round steak or 2 teaspoons sago. 

shin of beef. 1 egg yolk. 

1 pint water. Salt. 

Cut the beef into small pieces, add the water and 
let stand for half an hour; then cook in a double 
boiler two hours; strain, and press as much as possible 
of the meat pulp through a sieve. Add the sago, 
return to the saucepan and cook half an hour longer. 
Season and pour the broth over the yolk of the egg 
which has been lightly beaten. Serve at once. 

Invalid's Tea 

1 teaspoon tea. 1 cup scalded milk. 

Sugar to taste. 

Bring the milk quickly to the scalding point and 
pour it over the tea. Let the two infuse four minutes, 
fftrain, and serve with or without sugar. Tea made 
hy this method nourishes as well as stimulates. 

Clam Broth 

6 clams in shells. }^ teaspoon butter, if 

IH cups water. allowed. 

Scrub the shells and put them in a saucepan with 
cme cup of water. Cook till the shells open, remove 



RECIPES FOR THE SICK 225 

the clams, chop and return them to the saucepan with 
the water. Cook ten minutes, strain, and add the 
remaining water if necessary to reduce the strength 
of the broth. Season and serve. 

Beef Juice 

li pound top round of beef. Pinch of salt. 

Broil the meat for about two minutes to "start" 
the juice, then press all the liquid from it with a meat 
press or an old-fashioned wooden lemon squeezer. 
Turn into a warm cup, or colored glass to disguise the 
color; add salt to taste, and serve. As this will not 
keep it must be prepared fresh for each serving. 

Beef Tea 

yi pound round steak. % pint water. 

% teaspoon salt. 

Cut the meat in small pieces, the smaller it is cut 
the more easily it will give oflE its juices, or scrape it 
from the fibre. Add the cold water and stand aside 
for half an hour. Then place in a Mason jar, cover 
and stand in a saucepan of cold water; let it heat 
slowly to about 140 degrees and cook two hours; 
strain and season. It is better to have the jar raised 
from the bottom of the saucepan, that it may not 
come in too close contact with the heat of the range. 
Beef tea may be served hot, frozen, or in the form of 
a jelly, the latter consistency being obtained by the 
addition of one scant teaspoon of granulated gelatine 
soaked five minutes in a tablespoon of cold water and 
added to the beef tea as soon as the latter is strained. 
Stand in a cool place until set. 

Oatmeal Gruel 

1 cup water or milk. 1 tablespoon oatmeal or 

X teaspoon salt. rolled oats. 

Have the water or milk actively boiling, shake the 
oats into it and cook fifteen minutes. Then place 



226 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOKT BOOK 

over hot water (a double boiler is best) and cook one 
hour. If the gruel is made with milk add the salt 
just before serving; with water, it may be put in 
earlier. Strain if desired to remove the particles 
of oats. 

Com Meal Gruel 

1% cups water. yi teaspoon salt. 

1 slightly rounding table- 
spoon com meal. 

Have the water salted and actively boiling, shako 
the meal gently into it and cook twenty minutes, 
stirring constantly; then turn the whole into a double 
boiler and cook two hours. Strain if desired. 



Arrowroot Gruel 

1 level tablespoon arrow- 2 tablespoons brandy or 

root. wine. 

1 cup milk. A very little sugar if de- 
yi teaspoon salt. sired. 

Mix the arrowroot smoothly with a little of the 
milk, heat the remainder andj^ when boiling, put in 
the arrowroot and cook gently for ten minutes; add 
salt and sugar and at the moment of serving, the 
brandy or wine. Arrowroot contains little nutri- 
ment, but is useful as a vehicle for the serving of stim- 
ulants. 

Irish Moss 

1 small handful Irish moss. yi teaspoon vanilla or other 
3 cups milk. flavoring. 

1 tablespoon sugar. 

Wash and pick over the moss carefully, add it to 
the milk in a saucepan, and simmer the two till the 
moss begins to dissolve. A double boiler is prefer- 
able as it prevents too rapid cooking. In about 
twenty minutes, if the moss is dissolving, strain 
through cheese cloth, add sugar and flavoring, and 



RECIPES FOE THE SICK 227 

turn into wet moulds or cups to cooL Serve with 
cream and sugar. 

Savory Custard 

1 cup beef tea or good 2 eggs. 

stock (chicken or H teaspoon salt, 

beef). t*epper. 

Beat the eggs till light but not foamy; add salt, 
and pepper if not objected to. Have the beef tea 
or stock hot and pour it over the eggs. Strain into 
greased cups or small moulds, and cover each with 
greased paper. Stand the moulds in a vessel of hot 
water and cook gently, either in the oven or over the 
fire, till the custard is set. As soon as a knife blade 
inserted in the custard comes out clean (not milky 
looking) remove from the fire. Unmould and serve 
hot or cold. Do not let the water surrounding the 
moulds boil or the custard will be honeycombed and 
less digestible. 

Puffed Egg 

1 egg. Pinch of salt. 

Separate the yolk from the white of the egg and 
beat the latter to a stifif froth, adding the salt. Turn 
into a cup and place in a steamer or vessel containing 
enough water to come halfway up the sides of the 
cup. Steam three minutes and if at the end of that 
time it is pufify looking, drop the unbroken yolk into 
the centre of the white, replace the cover of the pan 
and cook till the yolk is nearly set. Serve in the 
cup in which it is cooked. 

Custard Souffle 

2 teaspoons butter. J^ cup milk. 
1 tablespoon flour. 1 egg, 

1 tablespoon sugar. 

Melt the butter, add the flour and blend smoothly 
without browning. Pour in the milk and cook three 



228 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

minutes after boiling point is reached. Separate the 
white from the yolk of the egg and beat each. Pour 
hot mixture (let it cool a little) over the yolk, put in 
the sugar and fold in gently the stiffly-beaten white. 
Turn into two greased cups and bake in a steady 
oven till firm — about fifteen minutes. Serve at 
once with or without sauce. 



Egg Cream 

2 eggs Grated rind and juice of 

2 tablespoons sugar. half a lemon. 

2 tablespoons water. 

Separate the whites and yolks of the eggs, and 
beat the yolks with the sugar till well blended; add 
the lemon juice, rind and water, and cook in a double 
boiler, stirring constantly till the mixture begins to 
thicken. Add whites of eggs beaten till thick, and 
cook till the mixture resembles thick cream. Cool, 
and serve in small individual cups or glasses. 

Dainty Pudding 

Thin slices of stale bread Fresh, hot stewed fruit 
without crust. sweetened to taste. 

Custard or cream. 

Cut the bread into pieces about three inches long 
and an inch wide. Line a cup with the pieces fitted 
closely together; fill with hot, deep-colored fruit, and 
place more bread over the top. Place a plate over 
the pudding, put a weight on the plate, and set aside 
till cold. Turn out, and serve with cream or custard. 



Tapioca Jelly 

yi cup tapioca. Juice and grated rind of halt 

IM cups water. a lemon. 

yi cup sugar. 2 tablespoons sherry or 1 of 

brandy. 

Have the water at the boiling point in a double 
boiler, shake in the tapioca gently and cook for one 



RECIPES FOR THE SICK 229 

^: hour; strain if desired clear, or the tapioca can be left 
in. Add the sugar, lemon juice and rind, and when 
F cool, the wine or brandy. 

X 

1! Chicken Chartreuse 

1 cup cold cooked chicken. 1 cup chicken stock, or half 
Salt, pepper and a little stock and half cream, 

grated lemon rind. 2 level tablespoons granu- 

1 egg. lated gelatine. 

i 

Mince the chicken finely, pass through a sieve and 
season to taste. Soak the gelatine for ten minutes 
,. in the cold stock or stock and cream, then heat to 

'^ boiling point and, when the gelatine is dissolved, 

strain it over the chicken. Add the yolk of the egg 
lightly beaten, then the white beaten to a stifif froth. 
When partly cooled turn into a mould and put aside 
till very cold and set. Unmould and cut in thin 
slices. 

Sweetbreads k la Newburg 

1 pair of sweetbreads. 2 egg yolks. 

2 tables{>oons butter. 2 tablespoons sherry. 

1 cup thin cream. Salt ana pepper to taste. 

Parboil the sweetbreads in slightly salted water, 
cut them in cubes and cool. Melt the butter, put in 
the cubes and cook gently for five minutes. Add the 
cream and simmer five minutes longer; then put in 
the well-beaten yolks of the eggs and cook till they 
thicken, being very careful that the sauce does not 
curdle. Season to taste, and add the wine just before 
serving. This may be served on toast. 



Beef Cakes 

}i pound very lean round Salt and pepper, 
steak. Toast. 

Cut the meat into strips, remove every particle of 
fat, and scrape the pulp from the fibre of the meat. 



230 BUMFOBD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

Season lightly^ remembering that the palate is more 
sensitive to seasonings in sickness than in health. 
Form into very small balls or cakes, and broil about 
two minutes. Serve on rounds of buttered or dry 
toast. 

Scraped Beef Sandwiches 

]4, pound very lean steak. Plain or buttered bread or 
Salt and pepper. toast. 

Remove all fat, cut the meat into strips, scrape 
the pulp from the fibre, and season. Spread on thin 
slices of bread or toast, buttered or plain; cover with 
another slice, and cut into small strips. 



001 MEHORAHDA 

mini 
Mi 



k1 or 



MEMORAIOML 



CARVING 

THREE things are essential to good carving: 
first, a knowledge of the anatomy of the fish, 
fowl or joint to be served; second, a sharp carving 
knife; and, third, an acquaintance with the choice 
portions of the particular dish which is to be served. 



FISH 

In serving fish be careful not to break the flakes. 
With such fish as haddock, cod, flounder, etc., run 
the knife down the full length of the back fin to 
separate the flesh from the bone. Portions can be 
xhen divided easily. 

With salmon be sure to serve a little of the thick 
and a little of the thin flesh to each person. The 
middle of a fish is usually the choicest in flavor, the 
tail part the most insipid. 

When such fish as flounder or sole are fried it is 
wiser to fillet them — that is, remove the bone — 
before frying, as they are easier to serve when so 
prepared. 

MEATS 

Such joints as require it, from their lack of compact 
form, should be either tied, skewered or sewed into 
shape before cooking. When tying use white string; 
when skewering use steel skewers in preference to 
wooden ones, and when sewing use a trussing needle 
threaded with fine white string. Either method of 
securing the meat may be employed by the cook. 

Serve gravy in a separate vessel from the meat, 
that the carver may work more easily. 

Rib Roast. When the bone is left in, cut the 
meat in long, thin slices from the thin to the thick 
end of the meat. The thick, round muscle is the 

233 



234 RUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 

choice portion of the roast, the meat at the thin end 
being more or less tough as well as containing an 
excessive proportion of fat. It is wiser to remove 
the greater part of this thin end and cook it in some 
other form than roast, where it can be used to greater 
advantage. 

When the bone has been removed from a rib roast 
and the meat tied, skewered or sewed into shape, 
thin slices are to be cut across the upper surface of 
the meat. The skewers or tie threads must be left in 
place till the meat is cold so that it will retain its 
shape. 

Sirloin or Porterhouse Steak. First insert the knife 
close to the bone and cut the meat away from 
it. Serve to each person a portion of the tenderloin 
and a portion of the meat from the upper side of the 
bone. 

Round Steak. Gut in thin strips across the grain 
of the meat. This rule of cutting across the grain, 
instead of with it, holds good in the carving of all 
joints, whether roasts, pot-roasts, corned beef, beef 
k la mode or fresh boiled beef. 

Fresh or Salt Ham. Cut in very thin, rather 
slanting slices, beginning near the narrow end of the 
joint. In this way fat and lean are more evenly 
distributed. 

Tongue. If rolled, cut of! the top slice and set it 
aside; then cut thin, even slices across the meat. If 
the tongue is not rolled, cut slices from the thicker 
portion of the meat, discarding the tip as this is dry 
and can be used to good advantage for potting or for 
sandwiches. 

Leg of Lamb or Mutton. Have the fleshy side of 
the meat uppermost, and cut even slices down to the 
bone, beginning the carving about the middle of the 
leg and cutting towards the thick end of the joint. 
If the leg has been cut large, so that there are some 
of the chops with it (at the thick end) see that these 
are well cracked through the bones before cooking. 



CARVING 235 

The chops are better served while the roast is hot, 
as the meat is drier when cold than the more fleshy 
part in the middle of the joint. 

Loin of Lamb or Pork, Be very sure that the 
joints are well cracked, otherwise the meat can not 
be served neatly. Cut from the thin to the thick 
edge, having one rib bone in each slice of meat. 

Crown Roast of Lamb is carved in the same man- 
ner as the loin, one bone to a slice, cutting from top 
to bottom of the meat. 



POULTRY 

Roast FowL First remove the leg, then the wing, 
and next the side bones. Cut thin slices from the 
breast, running from the head toward the tail. Cut 
oflF the wishbone and make a crosswise incision in 
the body of the bird for the removal of the dressing 
if this is used. If the tendons have been removed 
from the leg before cooking, this portion should be as 
tender as any other. Unless this has been done it 
is better to leave these joints to be made tender by 
further cooking. 

Boiled Fowl is carved in the same manner, except 
that the breast is usually cut in thicker slices, and 
no dressing is served. 

Broiled Chicken. Split down the back before 
cooking, and at serving time cut lengthwise through 
the breastbone, then, if large, into quarters, cutting 
across the breastbone. If the chicken is small, serve 
half to each person. 

Duck and Goose. These are carved in almost the 
same manner as fowl; the breast, however, is not 
so thick, and the leg and wing joints lie somewhat 
closer to the body. The breast and wings of these 
birds are the choicest portions, the legs being gener- 
ally reserved and deviled, or reheated in some other 
way. It is generally considered that the leg of a 



236 KUMFORD COMPLETE COOK BOOK 



TO BONE A FOWL 

Wash and singe the bird, but do not draw it. 
Take a very sharp pointed knife and cut through 
skin and flesh the whole length of the back; then cut 
the flesh away from the bones, beginning at the neck, 
scraping all the meat from each bone as the work pro- 
ceeds. On reaching the wings, cut them off close to 
the body, and after the meat is all cut frpm the car- 
cass of the bird, the leg and wing bones can be more 
easily removed. These joints can be practically 
turned inside out, thus making the shape of the bird 
more symmetrical for stuffing and cooking. In boning, 
great precaution should be taken against breaking the 
skin, especially that of the breast. After boning, birds 
are stuffed with a savory dressing, the flesh sewed or 
tied in place over the stuffing, and either roasted or 
braised- 



flying bird and the wing of a swimmer are, with the * 

breast, the choicest portions. i 



i 



MEMORANDA 



IfEMORARDA 



Rumford Chemical Works 

BRANCHES AND AGENCIES 

Domestic 

The Rumford Company, 

99 and 101 Commercial St., Boston, Mass. 
The Rumford Company, 

407 Continental Building, Baltimore, Md. 
The Rumford Company, 406 Rush St., Chicago, 111. 

H. M. AUTHONY Co., 

261 and 263 Greenwich St., New York, N.Y. 
Lefebyre-Abhistead Co., 

20-22 South 14th St., Richmond, Va. 
Mailliard & Sghmiedell, 

N. E. cor. Sacramento and Front Sts., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Foreign 

Bovril, Limited London, E. C, England 

Georges Dethan Paris, France 

Nicola Valentino Naples, Italy 

China & Japan Trading Co., Ltd., Yokohama, Japan 

Charles Mabkell & Co Sydney, N.S.W. 

Felton, Grimwade & Co. . . . Melbourne, Victoria 
Elliott Bros., Limited . . . Brisbane, Queensland 
A. M. Bickford & Sons, Adelaide, South Australia 

New Zealand Drug Co New Zealand 

Cassels & Co. . Buenos A)Tes, Argentine Republic 
King, Ferreria & Co. ... Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 

J. Meyer Lima, Peru 

Daubb & Co Valparaiso, Chili 

HoLLiSTER Drug Co Honolulu, H.I. 

Jose Sarra Havana, Cuba 

Julio Labadie Sucrs y Cia., City of Mexico, Mexico 
Hans Lunden Christiania, Norway 

(230) 



Rumford Chemical Works 

PROVIDENCE, R.L, U.S.A. 

L. HORSFORD FARLOW, President. H. D. ARNOLD, Treasurer. 



Incorporated 1859 Cable Address "Rumford" 



Organized especially for manufacture of the culi- 
nary phosphate preparations invented by the late 
Prof. E. N. Horsford, one of the founders of the 
company, who, at the time, occupied the chair in 
Harvard University endowed by the famous domes- 
tic economist. Count Rumford, and known as "the 
Rumford Professorship.'' From this relationship 
the title of the corporation was derived, this in turn 
giving the name Rumford to the thriving post- 
office village which has grown up about its principal 
manufacturing establishment, four miles from Prov- 
idence on the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad. 

Here are located the chemical factories with their 
interdependencies of repair shop, carpenter shop, 
machine shops, cooper shop, harness shop, one of 
the laboratories, etc., in fact all the necessary ad- 
juncts that go to make up a great manufacturing 
enterprise of this kind. Here also has been estab- 
lished a library for the free use of the employees. 

The main offices, packing department, printing 
and binding departments (producing labels, circulars, 
pamphlets, etc., used in the business), the principal 
and research laboratories, with other departments, 
occupy buildings owned by the company covering 
more than an entire square in the City of Provi- 
dence, R.I. 

(240) 



HORSFORD-S ACID PHOSPHATE 

(NON-ALCOHOUQ 



A solution of the phosphates of lime, magnesia, 
potash and iron in phosphoric acid. It is not a 
compounded patent medicine, but a scientific prepa- 
ration recommended and prescribed by physicians 
of all schools. 

INDIGESTION AND DYSPEPSIA. Half a teaspoon- 
ful Horsford's Acid Phosphate in half a glass of hot or cold 
water, or tea without milk, taken with each meal, or half 
an hour thereafter, makes the process of digestion natural 
and easy, and creates a good appetite. 

NERVOUSNESS, EXHAUSTION, ETC. Horsford's Acid 
Phosphate supplies the waste of phosphates caused by every 
mental and physical exertion. It imparts new energy, in- 
creases the intellectual and physical power, and is an agree- 
able and beneficial food and tonic for the brain and nerves. 

HEADACHE. Horsford's Acid Phosphate relieves headache 
caused by overwork, nervous disorders or impaired digestion. 

TIRED BRAIN. Horsford's Acid Phosphate acts as a 
brain food, increasing the capacity for mental labor, reliev- 
ing the tired brain, and imparting new energy to that organ. 

WEAKENED ENERGY. Horsford's Acid Phosphate 
acts as a nutrient to the cerebral and nervous systems, giving 
vigor and renewed strength where there has been exhaustion. 

SLEEPLESSNESS. Half a teaspoonful Horsford's Acid 
Phosphate in half a glass of water just before retiring brings 
refreshing sleep. 

A DELICIOUS DRINK is made by adding a teaspoon- 
ful of Horsford's Acid Phosphate to a tumbler of water and 
sweetening to the taste. 

FOR SALE 67 DEALERS IN MEDICINES 

If your druggist cannot supply you, we will mail you a trial 
flise bottle upon receipt of 25 cents. 

(241) 



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